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    Five Countries and Eight U.S. States Want To Ban Sales of Gas Vehicles By 2050


    • 2050 Will See No More Gas Cars In Certain Countries and States

    By 2050, eight states in the U.S. and five countries will ban the sale gas powered vehicles and only allow zero-emission vehicles (ZEV) to be sold.

     

    Car and Driver reports that eight states (California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont) and five countries (Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Quebec, the United Kingdom) will only allow automakers to sell ZEVs by 2050. The announcement was made against the backdrop of the United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP21) taking place in Paris. The two groups point that only selling ZEVs allow emissions to be cut by 40 percent, temperatures will stabilize, and a number of other benefits.

     

    But there are some stumbling blocks to this goal. The biggest one is can countries and states ban the sale of gas vehicles. There's also the question of whether people will be interested in buying a ZEV.

     

    Source: Car and Driver

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    When in Hell did Québec become a country?

     

    There was only two referendums, in 1981 and in 1996, and both times the answer was NO!!!

     

    Alls I know...Pauline Marois better not read that article from Car and Driver, délusions of grandeur have been curtailed, we dont want any false hopes...I mean, just because the Force has awakened that separatists in Québec also have to be awakened...

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    It is interesting to see how many people from various states and countries have gone to the climate change meeting in France and are jumping in with little knowledge.

     

    Over all I think we should have hybrids and EVs that can easily cover 200-300 miles by 2050 so banning all petrol autos for the citizens is understandable. I question if this can be done for police, fire, businesses, etc.

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    Don't see it happening....I do much less gas being used as cars will be powered by both gas and voltage...

     

     

    With the population growth currently, more likely will see a rise in public transportation....

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    Public Transportation will only work if Politicians stop playing games of wasting on pie in the sky projects and takes a common sense approach to mass transit. Right now that is not happening and we have the worst mass transit in the world compared to Europe or Asian rim.

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    mass transit controls where and when you can go.  A road gives you the chance to set your own route, and schedule.  Mass transit ought to never become the predominant route of transport for the masses.  

     

    But news flash, the govs and the techies will be in cahoots to push the automated car agenda and this is what is not mentioned here.  If we are forced into self driving cars exclusively, then they really have us by the nuts.  Sure, you can summon a car when you need, but then you have no control over if 'the grid' slows you down to 35 mph.  It could f over your day if you want to change your route and the 'system' says, 'oh, too much traffic on road 6, so its closed for the next two hours, sorry'.

     

    So between this electric only push (which is silly, we need 'fuel diversity') and self driving cars, they really will be putting the screws to us.

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    Public Transportation will only work if Politicians stop playing games of wasting on pie in the sky projects and takes a common sense approach to mass transit. Right now that is not happening and we have the worst mass transit in the world compared to Europe or Asian rim.

    Don't kid yourself, a lot of the proposed new light rail stuff is part of a collusion between govt and connected parties to dump $$$ into creating dense housing and retail stops that make money for those connected and put out of business places that already do a fine job of serving housing and retail on already established roads.  Of course its all tied to global agenda stuff.  The local met council here was formed originally for coordination of sewer access.  Now their thing is creating 'equity'.  Stick to sewers, that is why you were formed. 

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    if gas engines are still being made in 30 years, i'd be surprised if there wasn't a displacement tax on them.... at least if it's not a HD truck and, i'd bet most vehicles would not have v6 options.

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    mass transit controls where and when you can go.  A road gives you the chance to set your own route, and schedule.  Mass transit ought to never become the predominant route of transport for the masses.  

     

    But news flash, the govs and the techies will be in cahoots to push the automated car agenda and this is what is not mentioned here.  If we are forced into self driving cars exclusively, then they really have us by the nuts.  Sure, you can summon a car when you need, but then you have no control over if 'the grid' slows you down to 35 mph.  It could f over your day if you want to change your route and the 'system' says, 'oh, too much traffic on road 6, so its closed for the next two hours, sorry'.

     

    So between this electric only push (which is silly, we need 'fuel diversity') and self driving cars, they really will be putting the screws to us.

     

     

    Sounds great but many cities are starting to run out of room for cars...commutes for 10-15 miles can take hours in some places....

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    if gas engines are still being made in 30 years, i'd be surprised if there wasn't a displacement tax on them.... at least if it's not a HD truck and, i'd bet most vehicles would not have v6 options.

    In that amount of time there will probably be some tricky engine/powertrain configurations. I could see 2 and 3 cylinder engines being the norm in small cars, hybrids of course as well. I feel the displacement tax is an inevitable thing, just give it enough time...  

     

    Personally, I think HD trucks should also get a lose/minimal requirements. I don't think they should be just free range on power and aero..just because..

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    The C&D article does not refer to Quebec as country, just says they are part of the global HEV alliance

     

    http://zevalliance.org/content/participants

     

     

    When in Hell did Québec become a country?

     

    There was only two referendums, in 1981 and in 1996, and both times the answer was NO!!!

     

    Alls I know...Pauline Marois better not read that article from Car and Driver, délusions of grandeur have been curtailed, we dont want any false hopes...I mean, just because the Force has awakened that separatists in Québec also have to be awakened...

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    The C&D article does not refer to Quebec as country, just says they are part of the global HEV alliance

     

    http://zevalliance.org/content/participants

     

     

    When in Hell did Québec become a country?

     

    There was only two referendums, in 1981 and in 1996, and both times the answer was NO!!!

     

    Alls I know...Pauline Marois better not read that article from Car and Driver, délusions of grandeur have been curtailed, we dont want any false hopes...I mean, just because the Force has awakened that separatists in Québec also have to be awakened...

     

    Thanx for the info....I really did not feel like reading the article because:

     

    1. The way I read that quote, it made me question my sanity...maybe I got seduced and sedated by lovely females and when I awoke, Quebec was independent.

    2.  Our Premier, Mr. Couillard did make some noise at this conference...some UNWANTED noise that some in his office and other opposing politicians dont agree with....but the Montreal Gazette says he wants to do away with NATURAL GAS by 2050, nothing about GASOLINE....

     

    http://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/analysis-couillard-shows-how-green-he-is-at-climate-conference-back-home-people-wonder-is-it-practical

     

    which makes no sense at all as Quebec also owns a natural gas company that supplies Quebecois with natural gas....Gaz Metropolitain...

    And others also point out how quite the task that would be to achieve this....therefore, even if he also agreed to no gasoline powered vehicles by 2050...I doubt this will ever come to fruition...

     

    However....googling this story for further info...I came across an article that Toyota wants to reduce by 90% of 2010 sales of gasoline powered cars by 2050...interesting...

     

    http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Toyota-aims-to-nearly-eliminate-gasoline-cars-by-6571406.php

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    mass transit controls where and when you can go.  A road gives you the chance to set your own route, and schedule.  Mass transit ought to never become the predominant route of transport for the masses.  

     

    But news flash, the govs and the techies will be in cahoots to push the automated car agenda and this is what is not mentioned here.  If we are forced into self driving cars exclusively, then they really have us by the nuts.  Sure, you can summon a car when you need, but then you have no control over if 'the grid' slows you down to 35 mph.  It could f over your day if you want to change your route and the 'system' says, 'oh, too much traffic on road 6, so its closed for the next two hours, sorry'.

     

    So between this electric only push (which is silly, we need 'fuel diversity') and self driving cars, they really will be putting the screws to us.

     

    Please get over the absurd notion Mass Transit and Cars are zero sum.  I don't understand how you make the leap to "If we fund mass transportation, then we won't have freedom to move around".

     

    You clearly only have experience with American mass transit, which even the best systems (NYC? DC? Chicago? I suppose it is up for debate) absolutely SUCK by European standards.  When the Uber drops me off at the airport for two weeks in Europe, that is the last time my butt touches a car seat for a full two weeks.  Two trips ago, I landed in Paris, visited the city using their subway, visited Versailles and the countryside using trains, took the train to Brussels, then to Achen, Germany, then to Cologne Germany, then out to the countryside 45 minute train ride outside of Cologne, then back to Cologne where I can get ANYWHERE in the greater metro area in 30 minutes or less... and never once touched a car.   I never felt that I wasn't in control of my schedule because the transit systems are robust and the next train/bus/subway arrives every 3 to 15 minutes.  Most white color jobs will cover some or all of their employee's monthly transit pass cost.... even then, the cost of a monthly pass is only about $175 last I looked. 

     

    My friends who live in Cologne have 4 bedroom house (we'd call it a condo, but it is HUGE by American condo standards) with a garage in the Cologne suburbs.  They have never owned a car and use public transit 98% of the time. For that last 2%, DeutscheBahn has a car sharing service with cars spread all over the city and regular rental car agencies (Enterprise, Sixt) are available with a Starbucks like frequency all over the city for longer rentals. 

     

    If you're a frequent rail traveler, you can buy a BahnCard 100 for $4,477.  That gets you on any train, bus, or subway ANYWHERE in Germany and also good for trips outside of Germany using DeustcheBahn trains for 12 months. That means with a Bahncard 100, you can go from Cologne to Paris and back for free as many times as you want, but that also includes all of your metro travel in Cologne, which would normally cost you $2100 a year... so really you're paying $2377 a year for any rail travel in Germany outside of your home city.  You can't beat that on cost with a car no matter which way you slice it.  On all tickets, children under 14 travel for free when accompanied by their parents.

     

    Sometimes, when I'm there, I rent a car.  Not because I have to, but because I want to since I enjoy driving.  The blend of public transit and automotive there is exactly what we should be emulating.... it increases freedom of mobility, it doesn't decrease it. 

     

    P.S. - Don't give me the "population density" crap argument. East of the Mississippi, the population density of the US is equal to the population density of Europe.... in the North East, it is even higher.  West of the Mississippi, the population density of the metro areas are all similar to European metro areas. 

     

    The only thing we lack is the willpower.... everything in the U.S. has become "too hard" or "it might inconvenience me" or "It might cost me an extra 15 cents per gallon" even though the net result is an improvement in our lives.

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    I agree with what you said Drew 100000000000%.

     

    Europe is fantastic when it comes to trains, buses and metro systems...

     

    They had no choice...after WW2, roads were destroyed....gasoline was uber expensive...still is...

    The bestand cheapest way for Europe to get the people back on the roads to work was through a very elaborate public transit system...

    Donkeys with Donkey trails and itty bitty cars was how they got going after the war and how they advanced their cities was with public transit...

    Here in North America....with the visions of grandeur that soldiers saw with the autobahn...which coincided with GM's vision of the future for the automobile in their Motorama exhibits , the car was our form of freedom and excess luxury....and THAT ideology is gonna be nearly impossible to reverse...so much so...that some of us are soooooo wound up in our gasoline powered cars, that we wont even accept electric cars...so how in the world are we gonna accept mass public transit?

    Its sad really!

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    I agree with what you said Drew 100000000000%.

     

    Europe is fantastic when it comes to trains, buses and metro systems...

     

    They had no choice...after WW2, roads were destroyed....gasoline was uber expensive...still is...

    The bestand cheapest way for Europe to get the people back on the roads to work was through a very elaborate public transit system...

    Donkeys with Donkey trails and itty bitty cars was how they got going after the war and how they advanced their cities was with public transit...

    Here in North America....with the visions of grandeur that soldiers saw with the autobahn...which coincided with GM's vision of the future for the automobile in their Motorama exhibits , the car was our form of freedom and excess luxury....and THAT ideology is gonna be nearly impossible to reverse...so much so...that some of us are soooooo wound up in our gasoline powered cars, that we wont even accept electric cars...so how in the world are we gonna accept mass public transit?

    Its sad really!

     

    And guess who funded the rebuilding of their public transit systems..... 

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    I agree with what you said Drew 100000000000%.

     

    Europe is fantastic when it comes to trains, buses and metro systems...

     

    They had no choice...after WW2, roads were destroyed....gasoline was uber expensive...still is...

    The bestand cheapest way for Europe to get the people back on the roads to work was through a very elaborate public transit system...

    Donkeys with Donkey trails and itty bitty cars was how they got going after the war and how they advanced their cities was with public transit...

    Here in North America....with the visions of grandeur that soldiers saw with the autobahn...which coincided with GM's vision of the future for the automobile in their Motorama exhibits , the car was our form of freedom and excess luxury....and THAT ideology is gonna be nearly impossible to reverse...so much so...that some of us are soooooo wound up in our gasoline powered cars, that we wont even accept electric cars...so how in the world are we gonna accept mass public transit?

    Its sad really!

     

    And guess who funded the rebuilding of their public transit systems..... 

     

    USA USA USA USA

     

    We rebuilt the bloody continent just about. Another reason why CNG is the prominent fuel on auto's in Italy.

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    The States...

     

    The States have also rebuilt their automotive companies too...M-B, BMW, VW...OK...I think VW was the Brits...

    The Japanese car companies too...

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    The States...

     

    The States have also rebuilt their automotive companies too...M-B, BMW, VW...OK...I think VW was the Brits...

    The Japanese car companies too...

     

    Opel, Ford of Europe, Renault, Peugeot, Citroen too.

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    The States...

     

    The States have also rebuilt their automotive companies too...M-B, BMW, VW...OK...I think VW was the Brits...

    The Japanese car companies too...

     

    Opel, Ford of Europe, Renault, Peugeot, Citroen too.

     

    Yup...I did not want to go further than what I did and mention all the companies...but very yup!

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    It also goes back to the stupid subdivision setup created by early North America.

     

    Back in the day of the colonies actually. They thought it'd be better to have squares than circles. 

     

    And that is something that set the tone for how fudged up transit here really is.  

     

    The Paris transit system is like the best in the world... anyways plenty of circles.

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    It also goes back to the stupid subdivision setup created by early North America.

     

    Back in the day of the colonies actually. They thought it'd be better to have squares than circles. 

     

    And that is something that set the tone for how fudged up transit here really is.  

     

    The Paris transit system is like the best in the world... anyways plenty of circles.

    I had to google the Parisienne Transit system to get a glimpse of what you were saying, and I saw what you meant by plenty of circles...

     

    However, I dont comprehend your theory of a circular transit system versus one that is parallel and perpendicular forming perfect squares and rectangles...

     

    I know that in a road system.....straight lines that make roads into perfect squares is the way to go as its easy to divide a city between North/South/East/West, to have a logical number system and to never get lost and many other reasons....but in a mass transit system....I fail to understand the reasoning.

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    This is a bogus, bozo solution to a non-problem.  Better for the world to turn vegan than give up real cars.  Greenhouse gases from livestock are by far worse than fossil fuel emissions.

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