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    2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    August 21, 2013

    Read any recent reviews of Hyundai vehicles? If you have, then I'm sure you have noticed a trend. A number of reviews (including mine) have included some variation of this line: 'Hyundai is a fast learner and the next or refreshed model will be great.'

    Case in point, the Genesis Coupe. When the Genesis Coupe went on sale in 2009, eyebrows were raised. A year before, Hyundai unveiled the Genesis sedan and people were trying fathom the idea of a rear-drive Hyundai. Much like the sedan, the Genesis Coupe was mostly well-received aside from a few problems; the gearbox was a bit of a mess, the brakes needed some work, and the handling was a bit of a handful. Fast forward to 2012 and Hyundai gave the Genesis Coupe a massive refresh to address those problems.

    I recently spent a week with a 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track to see if the mantra of 'the next model will be better' works or not, and find out if it deserves to be on the list of sports cars.

    The Genesis Coupe is a pretty good looking coupe. Hyundai's 'fluidic design' makes a noticeable appearance with sharp creases and a distinctive character line along the doors to the rear. The rear end is short and comes with a rear spoiler to accentuate its sportiness. There is one part of the Genesis Coupe that you either love or hate and that is the front end. For the 2013 model, Hyundai changed up the front end with a new hexagonal grille, new HID headlights and fog lights, and new hood with faux hood scoops. The new look does give it more aggression, but it also makes it look somewhat ugly.

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    Inside, the Genesis Coupe is all business. You slip into nicely bolstered leather front seats with power adjustments that hold you in if you decide to have a bit of fun. You'll also take in sporty touches such as a brushed trim along the center stack and a trio of gauges that show ECO (fuel economy), torque, and oil temp. The gauges are a bit hard to look at a glance thanks to their low position on the center stack. Also, I'm trying figure out why Hyundai put an ECO gauge since there is a average fuel economy screen in the trip computer.

    gallery_10485_679_541141.jpg

    My tester came equipped with a seven-inch touchscreen that houses Hyundai's BlueLink infotainment system and navigation. I found the screen to be somewhat of a reach, but the system responded quickly and provided excellent graphics.

    As for the back seat, that's best left for small children, items, and your imaginary friends.

    You have the choice of two different engines for the Genesis Coupe. The base is a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder, while a 3.8L Direct-Injected V6 is the top engine. My tester came with the 3.8 and it packs quite the punch with 348 horsepower and 295 pound-feet. To say the engine is intoxicating to play with is a massive understatement. To start, the 3.8L loves to pull. Hit the accelerator pedal and the Genesis coupe snarls into life and moves you at a serious rate. 60 MPH is dealt within 5 seconds. Hyundai has also fitted a sound enhancer that brings the howl inside. It made me bury the throttle to the floor many times during the week.

    gallery_10485_679_896442.jpg

    Where the Genesis Coupe hits a wall is the optional eight-speed automatic. While it's smooth and knows what gear it should be in when driven sensibly or hard, it's the transition between the two that trips up the transmission. It seems the programming goes into schizophrenic phase and cannot decide what to do for a moment or so and then it figures it out and moves on. Not what I was expecting.

    Fuel economy for the 2013 Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track is rated at 16 City/25 Highway/19 Combined. My average for the week was around 20.2 MPG in mixed conditions.

    The Genesis 3.8 Track comes equipped with a track tuned suspension which makes it a love and hate relationship. You'll love how the Genesis Coupe is able to corner on your favorite road. You'll hate how stiff it is when your driving back and forth daily. The same applies to the steering. You'll enjoy the heftiness and feel it provides when you're attacking the road. However the heavy weight is verging on too much when your driving around on regular roads. It's a give and take with the Track model. Those looking for something not as harsh should look at the Genesis Coupe 3.8 Grand Touring.

    gallery_10485_679_1114981.jpg

    As for the brakes, the Track model comes equipped with a Brembo brake package. This braking system is very well done and brings the Genesis Coupe to a stop in short time.

    The mantra of Hyundai builds a great car the second time around rings very true with the 2013 Genesis Coupe. It wasn't that the original model was bad, there was just a lot of room for improvements. Hyundai made those improvements and created a car that fully belongs in the sports car class.

    gallery_10485_679_1430879.jpg

    Disclaimer: Hyundai provided the Genesis Coupe, insurance, and one tank of gas.

    Year: 2013

    Make: Hyundai

    Model: Genesis Coupe

    Trim: 3.8 Track

    Engine: 3.8L GDI Dual CVVT V6

    Driveline: Rear-Wheel Drive, Eight-Speed Automatic Transmission

    Horsepower @ RPM: 348 @ 6,400 rpm (Premium) / 344 @ 6,400 rpm (Regular)

    Torque @ RPM: 295 lb-ft @ 5,100 rpm (Premium) / 292 lb-ft @ 5,100 rpm (Regular)

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/25/19

    Curb Weight: 3,613 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, Korea

    Base Price: $34,250.00

    As Tested Price: $35,290.00* (Includes $895.00 destination charge)

    Options:

    Carpeted Floor Mats - $110.00

    iPod Cable - $35.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Very cool, the Japanese, Chinese and European along with the US auto makers should be concerned as the Koreans are responding to build world class leading cars for each segment or near there. Be interesting to see where this company is in 5 to 10 years. Will it replace Toyota and then fall like GM or will it be able to take over and become one of the largest car companies in the future?

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    I drove a 2010 model once, it was too rough and loud for my liking, over rough pavement you felt it, and the engine wasn't smooth enough. I like the visual updates to the new car though, and I thought the old one with 306 hp was fast. I am not sure if I had a track model or not, perhaps Grand Touring is a bit more refined. That was the one miss for me on the first generation of this car, you feel every bump and it is racy all the time, and if you want a comfortable quiet commute to work, it couldn't give you that. If you want loud and racy, this is your car.

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    Fuel economy doesn't rank high on my list of priorities. But 16 / 25 really sucks dirt for a 3.8L V6 pulling a 3600 lbs coupe with DI and 8-speeds. The C55 AMG I had was 16 / 22 and that's a 5.5L V8 pulling about the same weight and with just 5-gears (geared pretty low too with 80 mph being 3000 rpm in 5th).

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    This is a very nice looking car in my humble opinion. It seems like it is real sporty. Sounds like something you wouldn't really want to drive daily though.

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    I just can't... the... looks...

    I like it.. Except for the front. But then I like Lexus' new grille on some of their models, so what do I know.

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    I really like this car and will most likelt be the one I end up getting. I was at a dealer recently and they had one of these in the back (don't think it was a 3.8) but I thought highly of it. It might be lacking in power compared to the competition, but it's style won me over.

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