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wildmanjoe

Cheers or Jeers: 1,300 Mile 1985 Trabant Convertible

Cheers or Jeers: 1,300 Mile 1985 Trabant Convertible  

6 members have voted

  1. 1. Cheers or Jeers?

    • Cheers! Four wheel independent suspension and a four speed? Why, it's only four cylinders away from being a Corvette!
      2
    • Jeers! Check out the camber on those rear tires!
      4


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Cheers or Jeers: 1,300 Mile 1985 Trabant Convertible

This 1985 Trabant was last owned by renowned automotive engineer, Peter Dawson. After a legendary motorsports career, which included initiating the MOPAR performance parts group within Chrysler, Dawson developed an affinity for unique cars. This Trabant has only 1,337 miles (2,154 km) and is an amazing automotive icon. It is also very fun to drive and will draw a crowd where ever you go! Powered by a 601 cc two-cylinder, two-stroke, air-cooled engine, backed by a four speed manual transmission, this charming little car will leave you smiling at its no-frills approach to motoring. This car has never been driven in rain or snow, always stored indoors, and is in excellent condition throughout. Everything on this car works perfectly.

Like the Beetle, and the Mini, Trabants are legendary cars. And like the Mini and Beetle, it is often referred to without any mention of its manufacturer, Sachsenring. Often disrespected, most times undeservedly, the venerable Trabant was in production for nearly 30 years with 3.7 million produced. Nothing is made nearly 4 million times without getting quite a few things right!

How did the Trabant come into existence? Before WWII, the factories in Zwickau were the home of Horch, a manufacturer of very high quality cars, including Audi. They were both part of the Auto Union group which also included DKW. When hostilities ended, Zwickau in East Germany fell under communist rule. Initially the factory was used to produce much needed tractors and trucks, but cars were badly needed as well.

Steel was rationed and in short supply, so research led to the development of Duraplast, a composite made up of a phenolic resin reinforced with cotton fibers. Duraplast panels are formed in a press similar to the process of pressing steel panels. A material still in use today, Duraplast proved to be very strong. In independent crash testing, Trabants were found to perform better than many small cars produced in Western Europe. With Duraplast bodies, very simple 2-stroke engines, and front wheel drive, the Trabants were durable, but also very easily repaired.

The Trabant P601 body style was retained until the end of production in 1991, leading many to believe that the cars stayed the same and no further development took place. In reality the cars were constantly developed and every year saw the introduction of a number of changes. The power output of the engine gradually increased, and engine improvements allowed it to run with much less oil. The brakes were improved, and the electrical system was upgraded from 6 to 12 volt. There were many other changes and the majority of them were able to be retrofitted to earlier cars.

We are proud to offer this truly unique and exclusive automobile to the most sophisticated collector, investor, or enthusiast who understand and appreciates the investment potential of this extremely rare Trabant. Please contact one of our expert sales consultants for more information. They will be happy to give you a complete walk-around, supply you with a more detailed description, and answer any questions you may have. Bid with confidence – this might be one of the best finds on eBay!

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Like the indigo edition Cube 1.8T reviewed elsewhere on this site, there are lines you don't cross.

UGHHHHHHHHH

Thanks for sharing this though, WMJ!

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Hey, this is a random thought but since the Trabant is cotton, if you wash it during a hot summer day, does it shrink?

(i'm not being serious)

Edited by black-knight

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All that money and you don't even get a whole Trabant, just roughly two thirds of one! Unfair!

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Hey, this is a random thought but since the Trabant is cotton, if you wash it during a hot summer day, does it shrink?

(i'm not being serious)

As soon as this place has the budget of Top Gear, we'll find out.

Also, I added the link I forgot to include earlier.

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JEERS

This is a collectors item only, not a worthy drive or even an investment. A toy for the rich and a lousy one at that.

I would rather have a Pinto.

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