Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The Subaru Outback has followed a formula of taking a wagon and making it somewhat capable off the beaten path. This formula has proved to be a massive success for the brand with the Outback being one the top sellers year after year. So what happens when this formula is applied to a smaller vehicle? Let’s find out as a 2015 Subaru XV Crosstrek came in for a weeklong review.

 

Starting with the Impreza Hatchback as a base, Subaru makes a few key changes to make the XV Crosstrek more rugged. The most noticeable change is in the ride height, where Subaru added 8.7 inches to make the XV Crosstrek more maneuverable when off the beaten path. Along with the increase in ride height, a set of chunky 17-inch wheels, body cladding, roof rails, and distinctive color choices help the XV Crosstrek stand out from its Impreza brethren.

 

Subaru’s interiors have been criticized for being stuck in the 90’s in terms of appointments and interior quality. Thankfully, Subaru has been addressing this with the introduction of recent Subaru models including the XV Crosstrek. The interior design is quite basic, with simple shapes and all of the controls within easy reach of driver and passenger. Paired with a mix of soft-touch plastics and faux metal trim, this is Subaru’s best effort for building a quality interior.

 


2015 Subaru XV Crosstrek 2.0i Premium 9


Subaru should also be given some credit for improving their infotainment situation. A 6.2-inch touchscreen comes standard, while a 7-inch version is an option. No matter which size you go for, you’ll have Subaru’s Starlink infotainment system as standard. The system comes with a number of features such as Pandora integration, hands-free text messaging, trip computer information, and more. The system is quick to respond and easy to use. The only downside is the piano black finish Subaru uses around the screen which allows for the imprints of fingertips.

 

In my XV Crosstrek tester, seats came wrapped in black cloth and provided good support for passengers on long trips. Back seat passengers won’t have much to complain as head and legroom is excellent. Cargo space is is somewhat small when compared to other competitors in the compact crossover class with 22.3 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 51.9 cubic feet with the rear seats down.

 

Power comes from a 2.0L four-cylinder engine with 148 horsepower and 145 pound-feet of torque. This comes paired to either a five-speed manual or CVT. No matter which transmission you pick, Subaru’s Symmetrical all-wheel drive system comes standard. This engine is a poor match to the XV as power comes on slow. In my notes, I described the engine feeling like a wind-up toy car to get moving. Not helping matters is the CVT which appears to be tuned for fuel economy than trying to get power to the road. The CVT also exacerbates engine noise, making the XV Crosstrek a very unpleasant vehicle to drive around in. I wished Subaru would swap the 2.5L four-cylinder from the Legacy as this would solve the power problem. The only upside to the 2.0L is fuel economy. The EPA rates the XV Crosstrek at 26 City/34 Highway/29 Combined. My week saw an average of 30 MPG.

 


2015 Subaru XV Crosstrek 2.0i Premium 8


 

In terms of ride and handling, the XV Crosstrek shines. Thanks to the increase in ride height and meaty tires, the XV Crosstrek will be able to tackle dirt trails or unplowed roads with no problems. For day to day driving, the suspension keeps bumps and road imperfections from entering the interior. Road and wind noise are kept to acceptable levels.

 

One option I was glad to see equipped on my tester was Subaru’s EyeSight driver assist system. This system employs stereo cameras mounted at the top of the windshield to feed data to three key systems: Adaptive cruise control, forward collision mitigation with automatic braking, and lane-departure warning. I have praised this system before and will do so again as I believe it delivers one of the best adaptive cruise-control systems yet. The system was able to keep the speed and distance I set with no problem, along with smoothly slowing down the vehicle if someone comes into your lane. Also, the forward collision mitigation system deserves some praise as alerted me to a vehicle that had suddenly stopped and allowed to me take evasive action with seconds to spare.

 

The 2015 Subaru XV Crosstrek is a mixed bag. On one hand, this little crossover is quite capable and deliveries impressive fuel economy. However, the XV Crossover loses big time with an underwhelming powertrain. If you’re considering an XV Crosstrek, be sure to check out other models as they offer most of the capability of the XV, but with a punchier engine.

 

Disclaimer: Subaru Provided the XV Crosstrek, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

 

 

Year: 2015
Make: Subaru
Model: XV Crosstrek
Trim: Premium
Engine: 2.0L Boxer DOHC Four-Cylinder
Driveline: CVT, All-Wheel Drive
Horsepower @ RPM: 148 @ 6,200
Torque @ RPM: 145 @ 4,200
Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 26/34/29
Curb Weight: 3,186 lbs
Location of Manufacture: Gunma, Japan
Base Price: $22,295
As Tested Price: $25,440 (Includes $850.00 Destination Charge)

 

Options:
Option Package 14: $1,295.00
Lineartonic Continuously Variable Transmission: $1,000.00


View full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had an Impreza rental in Banff, agree with you on the powertrain and small cargo area.  Worth paying extra for the Forester I think but you lose a little youthful image in that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like these, but totally agree with the lack of power...which will be important if you do take it off road a bit...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, agreed.. 148hp..145tq.. I know it weighs less than 3200lbs but that's still weak when running through an AWD and CVT. I feel like both of those waste more power than straight FWD/RWD and a conventional/Dual clutch transmission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they made these with the WRX's engine (STI's would be even better) and a 6MT, I would buy one tomorrow.

 

Not even kidding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Subaru should ditch the boxers iMo. I get its their signature thing but I think for some models they could improve e 4 cylinder experience by going inline. Of course it would probably mess up their and setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Subaru should ditch the boxers iMo. I get its their signature thing but I think for some models they could improve e 4 cylinder experience by going inline. Of course it would probably mess up their and setup.

Yeah, I don't think they could do that. A light turbo and DI should be enough

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Ford's announcement of dropping most of their lineup of traditional cars likely caused a number of automakers to consider doing something similar. One automaker that will not be doing this is Subaru.
      Dominick Infante, Subaru’s national manager of product communications told Motor Trend one of the key reasons they keeping traditional cars is increasing gas prices.
      “Gas prices are starting to come up now. So a good hedge for better economy is having a sedan,” said Infante.
      “So we still make the Impreza and the Impreza hatchback. They do get better gas mileage than say a comparable CUV like the Crosstrek so we do sell those so if the market does change that’ll help sales of sedans.”
      Subaru's entry-level Impreza helps bring first-buyers in and performance models like the WRX/STI and BRZ draw in customers in their late 20s and early 30s.
      Still, Subaru's car lineup is taking it on the chin. Here are the sales numbers through April,
      Impreza: 22,287 (Down 16.3% YTD)
      Legacy: 14,730 (Down 13.9% YTD)
      WRX/STI: 9,854 (Down 8.2% YTD)
      BRZ: 1,286 (Down 10.1% YTD)
      Their crossover lineup is doing slightly better. Again, here are the sales numbers through April,
      Crosstrek: 45,728 (Up 66.6% YTD)
      Outback: 58,205 (Up 2% YTD)
      Forester: 50,783 (Down 9.7% YTD)
      Source: Motor Trend

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Ford's announcement of dropping most of their lineup of traditional cars likely caused a number of automakers to consider doing something similar. One automaker that will not be doing this is Subaru.
      Dominick Infante, Subaru’s national manager of product communications told Motor Trend one of the key reasons they keeping traditional cars is increasing gas prices.
      “Gas prices are starting to come up now. So a good hedge for better economy is having a sedan,” said Infante.
      “So we still make the Impreza and the Impreza hatchback. They do get better gas mileage than say a comparable CUV like the Crosstrek so we do sell those so if the market does change that’ll help sales of sedans.”
      Subaru's entry-level Impreza helps bring first-buyers in and performance models like the WRX/STI and BRZ draw in customers in their late 20s and early 30s.
      Still, Subaru's car lineup is taking it on the chin. Here are the sales numbers through April,
      Impreza: 22,287 (Down 16.3% YTD)
      Legacy: 14,730 (Down 13.9% YTD)
      WRX/STI: 9,854 (Down 8.2% YTD)
      BRZ: 1,286 (Down 10.1% YTD)
      Their crossover lineup is doing slightly better. Again, here are the sales numbers through April,
      Crosstrek: 45,728 (Up 66.6% YTD)
      Outback: 58,205 (Up 2% YTD)
      Forester: 50,783 (Down 9.7% YTD)
      Source: Motor Trend
    • By William Maley
      When you’re buying a luxury flagship sedan, you are making a statement to the world. Drive an S-Class, 7-Series, XJ, or other sedans and the impressions can range from being someone important to just having a lot of money. But for some people, they don’t want their luxury sedan to make itself known to the world. They want to enjoy the features available on their sedan, but without making so much noise. That’s where the Genesis G90 could make some inroads. Part of Hyundai’s new luxury brand, the G90 has its sights set on the stalwarts of the flagship luxury class by offering many of the features and luxury appointments found in them at a very low price. We spent a week in a G90 Premium to see if this ploy could work.
      Genesis has injected a bit of style into the G90’s design. The key traits are a distinctive character line running the whole length of the vehicle and fenders that bulge out slightly. The rear end is slightly boring. However, the G90’s front end doesn’t quite fit in with the rest of the design. The flat nose and large grille borrowed from the smaller G80 seems a bit out of place.
      Step inside and the G90 seems to have the design and materials nailed down. It is quite handsome with a simple dash design, genuine wood trim, and a mix of Nappa leather and soft-touch plastics. But take a longer look and you begin to notice some glaring issues. The steering wheel is a good example as it doesn't feel like it is covered in leather. Instead, it feels like textured vinyl. This is odd since a couple of months after the G90, I spent some time in the G80 Sport and found the steering wheel to feel like leather. Another issue is the center stack's button and knobs which appear to be borrowed from Hyundai’s parts bin. I’ll admit I’m nitpicking, but it's the little things that can make or break a flagship luxury sedan. 
      Settling in the G90, you cannot help but be impressed by the front seats. Upholstered in Nappa leather, the seats offer the right mix of cushioning and support for long drives. The driver’s seat comes with 22-way power adjustments, while the passenger has to make do with 16-way power adjustments. One nice touch is the seat moving back whenever the door is open to allow for easier entry and exit from the vehicle. Those sitting in the back will have no complaints as there is a large amount of head and legroom on offer. A folding armrest has controls for climate control, audio, and heated seats. Ultimate models add more luxuries such as power adjustments and a rear-seat entertainment system.
      A large 12.3-inch screen houses Genesis’ infotainment system. This is controlled through either a controller knob on the center console or a set of buttons below the screen. Using the system is a breeze thanks to an easy to understand interface and the various control methods on offer. The screen is vibrant and allows you to have two functions up at the same time - having audio on one side and the navigation on the other. There are some areas Genesis can improve on. For one, the G90 doesn’t offer Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility - something most of the competition does. Also, it would be nice to have more than two USB ports - one in the front and the other in the rear - so that people are not fighting over who gets to charge their phone.
      Genesis offers two engines on the G90. Our base Premium tester came with the 3.3L twin-turbo V6 with 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque. The uplevel Ultimate features the 5.0L V8 with 420 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic is equipped with either engine and there is a choice of rear-wheel or HTRAC all-wheel drive - our test car had the latter. Unless you want the rumble of the V8, the twin-turbo V6 is the engine to go for. For one, the V6 feels just as fast as the V8. Outlets who have timed both say the V6 can match the V8 in 0-60 mph. Plus, the V6 feels more eager to accelerate thanks to torque arriving at 1,300 rpm. The eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts and doesn’t show any hesitation to downshift when more power is needed.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the 2018 G90 3.3T HTRAC AWD stand at 17 City/24 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed around 20.2 mpg.
      The G90’s ride is similar to big 70’s Buick or Cadillac, soft and pillowy thanks to the standard adaptive dampers. Even with the G90 set in Sport mode, the dampers were still able to keep road imperfections at bay. In terms of noise isolation, the G90 is towards the top. Road and engine noise are nonexistent inside. Only a little wind noise is noticeable. This makes the G90 a perfect car to take a long road trip. 
      The trade-off to the soft ride is a fair amount of body roll in corners, even in the sport mode. Steering is light, but has a precise feel. If you’re looking for a luxury sedan that is a bit fun on a winding road, we are happy to point you in the direction of a Cadillac CT6 or Jaguar XJ.
      The 2018 Genesis G90 significantly undercuts the competition when it comes to price. Our Premium tester came with a base price of $70,850 with the HTRAC AWD system. Add a $975.00 destination charge to get our as-tested price of $71,825. Considering that includes the 12.3-inch infotainment system, three-zone climate control, heated and ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, adaptive cruise control, lane keep assist, and surround view camera system, it makes the G90 very much a steal.
      The Genesis G90 may not shout out its intention of being a flagship sedan, but it goes about its business quietly. It delivers the smooth ride, long list of equipment, and understated looks a number of folks are looking for. The punchy twin-turbo V6 and low price are just the cherries on top. However, the G90 does cut some corners in terms of the materials. Considering the competition that the G90 is going up against, this is a big black mark for an otherwise excellent sedan.
      As they say, the devil is in the details.
      Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G90 Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Genesis
      Model: G90
      Trim: 3.3T Premium HTRAC
      Engine: 3.3L Twin-Turbo DOHC 24-Valve V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 365 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 376 @ 1,300 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/24/20
      Curb Weight: 4,784 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
      Base Price: $70,850
      As Tested Price: $71,825 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      When you’re buying a luxury flagship sedan, you are making a statement to the world. Drive an S-Class, 7-Series, XJ, or other sedans and the impressions can range from being someone important to just having a lot of money. But for some people, they don’t want their luxury sedan to make itself known to the world. They want to enjoy the features available on their sedan, but without making so much noise. That’s where the Genesis G90 could make some inroads. Part of Hyundai’s new luxury brand, the G90 has its sights set on the stalwarts of the flagship luxury class by offering many of the features and luxury appointments found in them at a very low price. We spent a week in a G90 Premium to see if this ploy could work.
      Genesis has injected a bit of style into the G90’s design. The key traits are a distinctive character line running the whole length of the vehicle and fenders that bulge out slightly. The rear end is slightly boring. However, the G90’s front end doesn’t quite fit in with the rest of the design. The flat nose and large grille borrowed from the smaller G80 seems a bit out of place.
      Step inside and the G90 seems to have the design and materials nailed down. It is quite handsome with a simple dash design, genuine wood trim, and a mix of Nappa leather and soft-touch plastics. But take a longer look and you begin to notice some glaring issues. The steering wheel is a good example as it doesn't feel like it is covered in leather. Instead, it feels like textured vinyl. This is odd since a couple of months after the G90, I spent some time in the G80 Sport and found the steering wheel to feel like leather. Another issue is the center stack's button and knobs which appear to be borrowed from Hyundai’s parts bin. I’ll admit I’m nitpicking, but it's the little things that can make or break a flagship luxury sedan. 
      Settling in the G90, you cannot help but be impressed by the front seats. Upholstered in Nappa leather, the seats offer the right mix of cushioning and support for long drives. The driver’s seat comes with 22-way power adjustments, while the passenger has to make do with 16-way power adjustments. One nice touch is the seat moving back whenever the door is open to allow for easier entry and exit from the vehicle. Those sitting in the back will have no complaints as there is a large amount of head and legroom on offer. A folding armrest has controls for climate control, audio, and heated seats. Ultimate models add more luxuries such as power adjustments and a rear-seat entertainment system.
      A large 12.3-inch screen houses Genesis’ infotainment system. This is controlled through either a controller knob on the center console or a set of buttons below the screen. Using the system is a breeze thanks to an easy to understand interface and the various control methods on offer. The screen is vibrant and allows you to have two functions up at the same time - having audio on one side and the navigation on the other. There are some areas Genesis can improve on. For one, the G90 doesn’t offer Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility - something most of the competition does. Also, it would be nice to have more than two USB ports - one in the front and the other in the rear - so that people are not fighting over who gets to charge their phone.
      Genesis offers two engines on the G90. Our base Premium tester came with the 3.3L twin-turbo V6 with 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque. The uplevel Ultimate features the 5.0L V8 with 420 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic is equipped with either engine and there is a choice of rear-wheel or HTRAC all-wheel drive - our test car had the latter. Unless you want the rumble of the V8, the twin-turbo V6 is the engine to go for. For one, the V6 feels just as fast as the V8. Outlets who have timed both say the V6 can match the V8 in 0-60 mph. Plus, the V6 feels more eager to accelerate thanks to torque arriving at 1,300 rpm. The eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts and doesn’t show any hesitation to downshift when more power is needed.
      EPA fuel economy figures for the 2018 G90 3.3T HTRAC AWD stand at 17 City/24 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed around 20.2 mpg.
      The G90’s ride is similar to big 70’s Buick or Cadillac, soft and pillowy thanks to the standard adaptive dampers. Even with the G90 set in Sport mode, the dampers were still able to keep road imperfections at bay. In terms of noise isolation, the G90 is towards the top. Road and engine noise are nonexistent inside. Only a little wind noise is noticeable. This makes the G90 a perfect car to take a long road trip. 
      The trade-off to the soft ride is a fair amount of body roll in corners, even in the sport mode. Steering is light, but has a precise feel. If you’re looking for a luxury sedan that is a bit fun on a winding road, we are happy to point you in the direction of a Cadillac CT6 or Jaguar XJ.
      The 2018 Genesis G90 significantly undercuts the competition when it comes to price. Our Premium tester came with a base price of $70,850 with the HTRAC AWD system. Add a $975.00 destination charge to get our as-tested price of $71,825. Considering that includes the 12.3-inch infotainment system, three-zone climate control, heated and ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, adaptive cruise control, lane keep assist, and surround view camera system, it makes the G90 very much a steal.
      The Genesis G90 may not shout out its intention of being a flagship sedan, but it goes about its business quietly. It delivers the smooth ride, long list of equipment, and understated looks a number of folks are looking for. The punchy twin-turbo V6 and low price are just the cherries on top. However, the G90 does cut some corners in terms of the materials. Considering the competition that the G90 is going up against, this is a big black mark for an otherwise excellent sedan.
      As they say, the devil is in the details.
      Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G90 Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Genesis
      Model: G90
      Trim: 3.3T Premium HTRAC
      Engine: 3.3L Twin-Turbo DOHC 24-Valve V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 365 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 376 @ 1,300 - 4,500
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/24/20
      Curb Weight: 4,784 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
      Base Price: $70,850
      As Tested Price: $71,825 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By regfootball
      Driven: 2018 Buick Regal Sportback Essence 2.0t
      (the original review is in this post.  A revised review is further down, in this post)
      HIGHS:
      -Nice understated shape conceals a cleverly integrated hatchback design
      -'Decent' propulsion from 2.0t engine
      -Nicely shaped upper dash with touchsreen oriented slightly to driver.  Interesting at least from a design standpoint.
      -Sporting driving position and good room in both rows, mostly, plus the biggest benefit being improved leg room over previous model
      -Really nice cargo space, with seats up, or seats down, the cargo area of this vehicle and the flexibility of it in a car like this IMO is a major draw
      -View outside of this vehicle is improved over its platform mate (Malibu, my daily driver) due to the rear door glass being longer and taller.  View out the front and rear is essentially the same.
      -AWD availability is a nice plus, thanks Buick.
      LOWS:
      -I can't recall any of the GM vehicles I have driven with this ubiquitous 2.0t engine, where i have actually been wowed or impressed by it.  It has decent thrust, but honestly you gotta spool it up a bit, the tranny doesn't respond instantly, it's not a five star smooth tranny, and it's kind of rough and noisy overall as a powertrain (AT LEAST FOR IT'S PRICE / CLASS).  I was hoping the 2.0 would make the car match the near luxury description but I don't think it's overall a smooth enough powertrain to meet that claim.  It's neither smooth, nor sporting or exciting.  And this is with front wheel drive.  I will reserve final judgment until i get in the GS with the v6, which is the engine I think most people will really end up liking in this car.
      -Heavier than it's Malibu platform mate.  No doubt acceptable due to the larger engine, but the benefit of the extra weight doesn't manifest itself in any real tangible way anywhere in the ride and drive of the car.
      -Not really any quieter inside than my Malibu.  Strange, because this Buick is supposed to have quiet tuning, and goo in the tires to help make it quieter.  The ride isn't really any more plush, either.
      -Steering is sort of dead and mushy.  That's not GERMANIC now, is it.
      -NEED TO BE ABLE TO TURN OFF THE AUTOSTOP WHEN YOU WANT TO.
      -Not really much nicer inside than in my Malibu.  The lower dash is the same 'less expensive' plastic you see in cheap Chevy's.  The door panels are a little nicer, but not that much more.  Many switches and buttons are the same.  The console is nicer (I don't like the shifter centered in the console now actually, it's quite a reach) I guess...except for cupholders in front of the climate controls.  The upper dash material is an upgrade over the Malibu, but it's not a PREMIUM dash material either.
      -I can't really tell for sure if the seats are better.  My Malibu seats are poor.  The Regal seats seemed to hug me more, but they still felt thin and insubstantial.  The leather quality was slightly better, but still nothing to write home about. 
      -Rear head room suffers a bit with the hatch design.  I don't mind the tradeoff personally, but the Malibu retains a bit more headroom, and the Regal TourX really has much more....so get the wagon if rear head room matters.
      -Sunroof was nice to have considering how bunkerlike the Malibu can feel....but again the hatch design limits the size of the sunroof here compared to the Malibu's BAMR.  I can live with the compromise here myself, and again, the wagon will satisfy your urge for BAMR if you need it.  I would encourage GM to develop a way to integrate a larger moonroof with the hatch design.  I think it could be done, but would require time and money on a redesign effort.
      -Options / packages on this car are, simply put, stupid.  But that merits its own post.  At least in this car, the heated steering wheel and leather heated seats were both included.  You can actually get this car with heated steering wheel but without heated seats.  How f-cked up is that?  In 2019, Fusion, Toyota, and others will have things like blind spot and cross path detection as standard equipment.  And those are not 'premium' makes.
      -I'll let others decide if they think the styling is too tepid.  I don't mind the understated styling but do admit that the color selections that are available on this car leave me wanting.  I like the red on the GS, and the smoked pearl metallic is nice.  And Buick seems to think they should charge extra for paint colors when they don't make the ride and drive anything special.
      -pricing.  I think the average nature of this car would be easily forgiven if the pricing were in line with being an average car; not priced for a premium marque.  Like the LaCrosse and Envision, it is best to wait out the model year if you are buying and wait for the inevitable 7,000-10,000 or more in discounts...which might bring the pricing in line with what the vehicle really is.  You can't say this vehicle is appealing at the prices it is at now.  
      SUMMARY:
      This probably seems like a negative review, but you should consider it more of underwhelmed and let down.  This car as I drove it just doesn't have any kind of endearing personality to speak of!  At the end of the day, it took Buick two extra years to bring to the US it's own Malibu clone, which doesn't have much more to show for it.... apart from the clever hatch and base 2.0 engine upgrade over the 1.5.  I actually am very curious now to be among the first to try the 2019 Malibu 1.5t + CVT combo.  But that's an aside for another discussion.  The 2.0 that general motors puts in so many vehicles has never impressed me, and that's due more to it's character than anything.  I had hopes this would be the ONE CAR that it would feel sporting in; one that would make the car feel at least a little, like a SPORTS SEDAN.  Nope.  I will wait with baited breath to someday find a v6 GS to test, as i think it will be the only Regal worth anything.  At least worth anything more than just being another option in the midsize, genericar class.  And I hope Buick is working on a twin turbo six option as well for the GS (GSX?).  I tend to think this car won't move the needle in marketplace excitement until it has a tire shredder under the hood to brag about...The v6 will promise smoother revs and deeper lungs at least......... Still, as a replacement in the bottom end of the Buick lineup for the Verano, I am ok with this.  Just please, sex it up!
       
       
       
       
  • My Clubs

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.