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Alfa Romeo's First Crossover Gets A Name :Comments


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Alfa Romeo's newest product plan has the Gilula arriving sometime this year, followed by a midsize crossover that is expected to go into production late this year. We have some new information on the crossover.

 

Auto Express reports the new crossover will be named Stelvio. This information comes from FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne at a recent event. Stelvio comes from the Stelvio Pass – a curvy stretch of road in Italy.

 

The Stelvio will use a modified version of the Giulia's platform and have the choice of rear-wheel or all-wheel drivetrains. It is expected that a range of four and six-cylinder gas and diesel engines will be on offer. Auto Express says there will also be a Quadrifoglio Verde version boasting the 2.9L twin-turbo V6 found in the Giulia Quadrifoglio Verde.

 

Marchionne also mentioned that the Giulia would be heading into production next month, refuting a report from earlier in the month saying the model had been pushed back once again due to failing internal crash tests.

 

However, we'll believe Marchionne when the Giulia begins rolling off the production line, whenever that may be.

 

Source: Auto Express


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Not impressed with the suv, the whole money spending on Alfa is a waste of time and resources that should be focused on the rest of the existing product line. Another Sergio screw up.

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I wanna agree with you DFELT on this...but I dont know how to agree on you with  it...

I know I DONT want to disagree with you on this matter...

 

Something about this project has me run afoul with my thought process about a SUV derived from the Giulia platform...

 

I guess its because I dont know what other brand will be using this SUV platform...

Because Im also conflicted because I know JEEP is also under FCA jurisdiction...and what role does this SUV play within the JEEP SUV world?

Because I wanna know where this Stelvio fits in with the  Jeep Grand Cherokee?

And will JEEP be getting this?

Or is it the eventual replacement for the GC?

And are JEEP engineers in any way involved with this?

And if the answer is yes...GREAT and if the answer is no...HOW COME?

 

 

Anyhoo, one thing they got right in my opinion is the name...

Stelvio...is a good name for an Italian enthusiast vehicle.

Whether sports car or SUV/CUV...

Edited by oldshurst442
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I wanna agree with you DFELT on this...but I dont know how to agree on you with  it...

I know I DONT want to disagree with you on this matter...

 

Something about this project has me run afoul with my thought process about a SUV derived from the Giulia platform...

 

I guess its because I dont know what other brand will be using this SUV platform...

Because Im also conflicted because I know JEEP is also under FCA jurisdiction...and what role does this SUV play within the JEEP SUV world?

Because I wanna know where this Stelvio fits in with the  Jeep Grand Cherokee?

And will JEEP be getting this?

Or is it the eventual replacement for the GC?

And are JEEP engineers in any way involved with this?

And if the answer is yes...GREAT and if the answer is no...HOW COME?

 

 

Anyhoo, one thing they got right in my opinion is the name...

Stelvio...is a good name for an Italian enthusiast vehicle.

Whether sports car or SUV/CUV...

I take no offense my friend, I think what I did not expand on is what you hit on which is we both feel the money Sergio steals out of Jeep, RAM, Dodge, Chrysler should have been put back into those brands to continue to improve and build excellent auto's that could be sold globally. 

 

Fiat should be killed off, Alfa should never have had money spent on it, just a vapor ware way for them to steal money and Maserati either needs distinct true Luxury items that set it apart from the competition. Right now I sit in one and hate to say it but feel they are nothing more than an over priced Buick, Acura, Lincoln, Lexus, Infiniti competitor. 

 

FCA is FAILING as they should be building a Global Platform that all brands can use to improve their existing lines rather than trying to revive a History note on Automobiles.

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