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The Diesels are a-coming,

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Just read this one from down under.

Maybe some have seen it, but I have not seen anything about it posted here,

so here 'tis!

GM Plots Global Diesel Offensive & Holden Could Benefit

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General Motors Is Plotting A Diesel Offensive On

The Hitherto Compression-Ignition Shy US Market

Gautam Sharma

19 May 2006

www.carpoint.com.au

GM is armed with a pair of high-tech new powerplants -- and it's not inconceivable that these units could eventually be offered in our own Holden Commodore.

"We are developing right now two highly modern diesel motors that won't just fulfil the Euro-5 emission standards, but the more stringent Bin-5 regulations in the USA," a senior GM source told German journal Automobilwoche.

The car-making giant is reportedly readying an oil-burning 2.9-litre V6 and a 4.5-litre V8 that will use cutting-edge new technology dubbed Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), said to boost fuel economy by about 20 per cent and generate fewer polluting hydrocarbons.

No power and torque figures have been released, but outputs of 160kW/500Nm are not inconceivable for the turbo-diesel V6 (compared with 175kW/320Nm for the current Commodore's 3.6-litre petrol V6), while the 4.5-litre V8 could punch out 240kW/750Nm (versus 260kW/510Nm for the existing 6.0-litre petrol V8).

However, we must point out that these numbers are only our estimates for what the diesels will generate.

US sources suggest GM's diesel offensive will start in 2008, with the engines ultimately destined for a range of sport utility vehicles (SUVs), pick-ups and large sedans in all GM brands and all markets.

GM's new-found interest in diesel is largely driven by a new law (which took effect from January 1 this year) in the US that allows consumers who purchase some new diesel-powered cars, light trucks and SUVs to be eligible for up to $US3400 in tax credits based on the weight, fuel efficiency rating and emissions level of the vehicle.

A recent study by JD Power and Associates reported that diesel and hybrid vehicles are expected to garner 11 per cent of US vehicles sales by 2012 -- with the diesel market increasing from a 3 per cent market share in 2004 to 7.5 per cent.

According to RL Polk data, diesels have already seen 56 per cent market growth in the US over the past five years with the introduction of models such as the Jeep Liberty CRD, Mercedes E320 CDI, and TDI variants of the Volkswagen Touareg and Passat.

But what does it mean for us? Well, GM's local Holden subsidiary has expressed interest in adopting diesel technology for its upcoming VE Commodore, so it's not impossible that one or both of the new-age engines could be slotted under its snout in due course.

Holden boss Denny Mooney has already conceded that diesel technology is being trialled in the Commodore, although he admits that a production variant is "further down the track".

"We have a (diesel) prototype running around, but there are a lot of barriers to diesel right now," Mooney said recently. "Not every service station has diesel fuel. And there's the stigma associated with the smell. You know, if you get diesel fuel on you it's like a cologne, it stays on you.

"So you've got to overcome that stigma that a lot of consumers have on their mind -- that they're dirty, smelly -- which they aren't. Modern diesels are very clean, as most of us know, but the public doesn't necessarily see it that way."

It's widely believed a 162kW/500Nm 3.0-litre V6 built by Italy's VM Motori is the leading candidate for the VE Commodore, but the new US-sourced diesels may also figure in the equation.

Meanwhile, arch rival Ford is also evaluating diesel technology for its Territory SUV, which is currently handicapped by relatively high fuel consumption from its 4.0-litre petrol engine.

As previously reported by CarPoint, Ford Europe's Dagenham Diesel Centre in the UK recently unveiled a high-tech new 200kW/640Nm 3.6-litre turbo-diesel V8 to supplement the smaller 140kW/445Nm 2.7-litre turbo-diesel V6 that's already available here in the Land Rover Discovery 3 and Range Rover.

And either, or both, of these units could be candidates for the Territory.

Our analysis ['Who's Fueling Who?'] corroborates that buying a diesel only pays off in the long-term. In the case of a Volkswagen Golf 2.0 TDI Comfortline, you'll need to drive it for around 80,000km to recoup its price premium over its petrol counterpart (based on current fuel prices).

However, if and when fuel prices hit $2 per litre -- as is being tipped by analysts -- the payback time will be dramatically shortened.

:deadhorse:

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Last edited by JoeT : Today at 07:06 AM.

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How much of a difference will HCCI make on a diesel, which already uses compression ignition anyway? The only difference is the homogeneous charge? I thought the 20% improvement was for gas engines, because they could support higher compression due to switching to compression ignition.

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impressive estimates... but i agree w/ Caddyxlr-V, well maybe it works for diesels, even if it's more like 10% increase.

it said all brands... prolly not pontiac, but does that mean diesel buicks? if this is real i hope the public / press start looking/reviewing them w/ a clean slate

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Wonder what the 2036 Car & Driver "Diesel Beater Scavenger Hunt"

will look like? Saddly, you can bet almost anything there will not be a Oldsmobile or a RWD Maxima w/ an inline-6, oil burning or not.

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My Dad loves the Avalnche, but he really, REALLY wishes it had a diesel. For his needs, the Duramax would be more than enough power. But a 4.5L V8 will be perfect.

... Hell, he doesn't even care if it's got a 4 speed auto (he's ol' school).

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My Dad loves the Avalnche, but he really, REALLY wishes it had a diesel. For his needs, the Duramax would be more than enough power. But a 4.5L V8 will be perfect.

... Hell, he doesn't even care if it's got a 4 speed auto (he's ol' school).

the duramax was originally supposed to be in the suburban and avalanche, i think the tahoe as well...

but the duramax production is maxed, GM didnt realize the growing market...

so GM decided to allocate the duramax to commercial vehicles only... i'm quite sure GM is making a huge profit on each duramax engine...

this i believe to be one reason we will be seeing more deisels here in the states in the years to come, because people have come to realize they arent as loud and dirty as they once were... they are amazingly fuel efficent and compared with the fuel efficency of a gas engine, they seem to have more spunk(due to the excess of the torque)...

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About time!

Indeed, the Cobalt really does need the CDTi diesel engines to truly compete with the Jetta. Probably be offered in base/LS, and LT trim.

You know, Audi Driver states that Audi AG is debating as to whether or not they should offer TDI engines in their sedans/Avants and not just the upcoming Q SUV's. A concern of theirs (with dollar vs. euro) is making a decent profit as well as whether or not Americans will embrace them, and that if they do wait, the possibility of them getting caught with their pants down if Mercedes-Benz goes through on its purported diesel assault on the U.S. in the next few years.

Go GM!

Edited by MyerShift

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Plus the reason the Duramax did not make it into the Suburban is for some strange reason the transmission tunnel is different than the Silverado, thus making them use a detuned Duramax. They could not stuff the Allison trans in there. I did ride a number of times in a passenger Chevy Express van with the Duramax in it. Very cool even though again it was detuned. That though was a mere clicks away in the cal. software...oh what fun!!

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The 4.5 V8 could go into various applications, from SUVs to large Sedans and Pickups. Even a Hybrid.

Cadillac, Cadillac, Cadillac

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For those who did not do the math - (me),

I just got the conversions to figures more familiar to us.

The 2.9L V-6: 160kW/500Nm = 215hp/369lbf-ft torque

The 4.5L V-8: 240kW/750Nm = 322hp/553lbf-ft torque

WOW !!!!!

These are some mighty impressive numbers.

:pbjtime:

AND:

As of Oct 15th, 2006 all US diesel fuel must comply with the new low-

sulfur requirements of the EPA. (20ppm of sulfur instead of the current

500 ppm of sulfur).

This has been standard in Europe for almost 2 years now.

Edited by rkmdogs

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For those who did not do the math - (me),

I just got the conversions to figures more familiar to us.

The 2.9L V-6: 160kW/500Nm = 215hp/369lbf-ft torque

The 4.5L V-8: 240kW/750Nm = 322hp/553lbf-ft torque

                WOW !!!!!

These are some mighty impressive numbers.

:pbjtime:

AND:

As of Oct 15th, 2006 all US diesel fuel must comply with the new low-

sulfur requirements of the EPA. (20ppm of sulfur instead of the current

500 ppm of sulfur).

This has been standard in Europe for almost 2 years now.

sweet numbers!!!!

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