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What do you do with T.O.s'? "Turn-overs" at dealerships; not Toronto


trinacriabob

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Just recently, I went to look at the fresh new car version of a car I have rented.  I wanted to see the sticker, sit in it, check visibility, yada yada.  The kid helping me was really nice and I didn't want to take up much of his time.  He added, "It sounds like you really want to drive this car."  I told him, "Not today."  We unlocked it, I sat in it, turned on the engine, and got a feel for the controls.  I also looked at the trunk.  That was all I needed.  I also took a brochure.

As I'm about to leave, he says, "If you've got a couple of minutes, there's someone I'd like you to meet."  *Cue to leave, in my book*  I told him that I didn't have the time and headed for the door.  It was an obvious turnover in the making.  If someone tries a turnover on me, I will not be buying a car from this individual in the future.  I just leave and it's a closed chapter.

Man, I hate going to the dealerships at night when the car doors are locked and you can't really get a feel for the car and I hate having to wait an entire year between auto shows so I can cut loose like a kid in a candy store, but also have to part with some coin for the hassle free privilege.  What do you do when you visit car dealerships out of curiosity and are subjected to a "turnover?"

 

Edited by trinacriabob
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First, you need to understand the salesman was just doing his job. You don't dictate his job, his Manager does. His Mgr is the one with the authority to discount prices, and he is the one who sets the sales process in place. Nearly every dealership has rules in place for the salesman to check in with management before letting a customer leave. Sometimes they involve the Mgr coming over to talk to you, sometimes they don't. Either way, the salesman has to follow the rules, just like you do at your work. If he doesn't, the Mgr may prevent him from taking any more ups, not give him leads, etc.

My only advice I can give is to tell them up front you are still in the early stages of your process, and that you don't plan on buying anything today. If the salesman needs to get the Mgr before you go, let him do his job. Politely reiterate what you told the salesman to the Mgr. At that point, you should not encounter any resistance in leaving. If you do, that dealer is not a place you want to do business.

If you don't like my suggestion, or the notion that you may have to speak to someone with more seniority than the salesman, than I suggest not going during business hours.

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7 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

than I suggest not going during business hours.

I agree 100% with ALL that you said...

Except that quote which I quoted you on...

I agree with the fact that the salesperson is doing his job.  I also agree that the dealership is there solely to sell cars, and that they need to sell cars any which way they see fit...

But...a dealership IS a store.

A dealership IS open DURING BUSINESS hours to ACCEPT POTENTIAL customers.

A POTENTIAL customer SHOULD be ABLE to VISIT a dealership DURING business hours...NOT before or AFTER business hours.

Yes...the salesman NEEDS to sell cars to live and he needs to do his job the way his boss tells him to. We discussed that.

As a potential customer though...

I NEED TO VISIT A DEALERSHIP WITHOUT THE CONSTANT HARASSING IF I WANT TO BUY THE CAR TODAY.

I NEED THE BREATHING ROOM TO SEE FOR MYSELF.

A SIMPLE NO THANX SHOULD BE ENOUGH...

If a dealership thinks that if a potential client leaves the dealership and that dealership equates THAT as a loss of a sale to another dealership...MAYBE THAT dealership should CHANGE the way they do business and leave the 1950s/1960s/1970s/1980s/1990s where they belong. IN THE PAST!!!

 

Yes. Yes. Yes.

I understand that there is a plethora of undetermined, uninformed morons out there that NEED this type of sales tactic even though they say they dont...

But...the salespeople and the managers NEED to IDENTIFY the differences between the many types of buyers...

The dealerships...should invest in TEACHING their salespeople HOW to sell to people in the 21st century.

The DEALERSHIPS need to get together ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY and CHANGE the INDUSTRY around...

INSTEAD OF FIGHTING with the PHOQUING customer...the PHOQUING INDUSTRY NEEDS TO CHANGE THIS! 

NO! Not the CUSTOMER...HE JUST WANTS TO BUY A PHOQUING CAR.

ITS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PHOQUING INDUSTRY TO CHANGE...

STOP BLAMING THE CUSTOMER AND PUTTING THE ONUS ON HIM!!! 

 

 

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Hadn't heard the term 'turnover' before in this context...when one salesman foists you off on another?      

My last car buying experience (last year w/ my Jeep) was very easy and smooth.  I searched the Phoenix area online for CPO GCs for a week after i decided I wanted to buy, found a couple specific ones at my closest dealer that were the price/mileage/color combo/equipment mix I wanted, went in on a Friday afternoon, pointed out the one I wanted to test drive, looked it over, test drove it, then bought it.   The 31st makes a year. 

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5 hours ago, Frisky Dingo said:

First, you need to understand the salesman was just doing his job. You don't dictate his job, his Manager does. His Mgr is the one with the authority to discount prices, and he is the one who sets the sales process in place. Nearly every dealership has rules in place for the salesman to check in with management before letting a customer leave. Sometimes they involve the Mgr coming over to talk to you, sometimes they don't. Either way, the salesman has to follow the rules, just like you do at your work. If he doesn't, the Mgr may prevent him from taking any more ups, not give him leads, etc.

My only advice I can give is to tell them up front you are still in the early stages of your process, and that you don't plan on buying anything today. If the salesman needs to get the Mgr before you go, let him do his job. Politely reiterate what you told the salesman to the Mgr. At that point, you should not encounter any resistance in leaving. If you do, that dealer is not a place you want to do business.

If you don't like my suggestion, or the notion that you may have to speak to someone with more seniority than the salesman, than I suggest not going during business hours.

Yes, I am aware that some dealerships are set up for a "T-O" while others are not.  Right, if these rules come from the top, then the "underling" (regular salesperson) has to follow them.  The timing is perfect here because, today, I looked at my VM and had gotten phone messages from both the salesperson and the sales manager.  The salesman was told that I was only looking, that I was passing through the general area (not that far, so feasible) from an appointment, and that I wasn't buying today.   I even declined driving the car.

I think that I've gotten sort of tired by this tactic.  The two on one pressure doesn't work for me.  I'd be writing the check and it's not a candy bar, so I tell them that.  Comments like "how would you like to drive off in this car today?" have never worked for me.  The absolute "winner" was when I was test sitting in a car in California, the salesman pulled a "T-O," and I got fairly heated with them since I was on vacation, the state in which I was domiciled had NO sales tax, and I asked them how they proposed to get the car to a DMV over the state line so I could purchase it free of  sales tax.   They didn't have a solution.  At this point, with vacation + living in a state without a sales tax combo, I felt I was in my right to tell them they were clueless and drive off.

5 hours ago, oldshurst442 said:

As a potential customer though...

I NEED TO VISIT A DEALERSHIP WITHOUT THE CONSTANT HARASSING IF I WANT TO BUY THE CAR TODAY.

I NEED THE BREATHING ROOM TO SEE FOR MYSELF.

A SIMPLE NO THANX SHOULD BE ENOUGH...

 

This.  

I haven't bought many cars because I keep them for as long as I can but I always remember the salesperson who was courteous, informative, not cheesy, and "soft sell," and that's who I go back to give my business to when it comes time to purchase.

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2 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

Hadn't heard the term 'turnover' before in this context...when one salesman foists you off on another?      

My last car buying experience (last year w/ my Jeep) was very easy and smooth.  I searched the Phoenix area online for CPO GCs for a week after i decided I wanted to buy, found a couple specific ones at my closest dealer that were the price/mileage/color combo/equipment mix I wanted, went in on a Friday afternoon, pointed out the one I wanted to test drive, looked it over, test drove it, then bought it.   The 31st makes a year. 

Yes, though "T-O" implies up a level in the pecking order.

With my current car, I found the car in the on-line inventory at a particular dealership, talked to the internet sales manager, and he quoted me a price right over the phone, which he stuck to.  The only glitch was that they wanted to sell me a different company's extended warranty while I wanted the one from General Motors.  They saw that the sale wouldn't go through unless it was the GM warranty product so they somehow managed to "find" the binder with the GM extended warranty information.  I never ended up using it.  Ditto with my previous GM car.  I guess that's good.

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14 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

Hadn't heard the term 'turnover' before in this context...when one salesman foists you off on another?      

My last car buying experience (last year w/ my Jeep) was very easy and smooth.  I searched the Phoenix area online for CPO GCs for a week after i decided I wanted to buy, found a couple specific ones at my closest dealer that were the price/mileage/color combo/equipment mix I wanted, went in on a Friday afternoon, pointed out the one I wanted to test drive, looked it over, test drove it, then bought it.   The 31st makes a year. 

Did it have an advertised price that you knew of up front and that was in the ball park?  And was there are any unpleasant and prolonged haggling over the price? 

I think that the experience is always more pleasant when one is actively looking and ready to purchase, as you describe you were doing.

It's annoying when they want to push an information gathering episode into a candy bar impulse purchase, and when the person they're pushing is better at penciling through things than they are.  That's the rub.

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1 minute ago, trinacriabob said:

Did it have an advertised price that you knew of up front and that was in the ball park?  And was there are any unpleasant and prolonged haggling over the price? 

I think that the experience is always more pleasant when one is actively looking and ready to purchase, as you describe you were doing.

It's annoying when they want to push an information gathering episode into a candy bar impulse purchase, and when the person they're pushing is better at penciling through things than they are.  That's the rub.

They had the internet price, and then the price on the windshield which was higher.  I got it for the internet price, which was pretty spot on for a CPO '14 Limited 4x4 V6 w/ 25k miles--based on comparisons w/ others listed in Az and So Cal. 

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On 3/24/2018 at 6:07 PM, oldshurst442 said:

I agree 100% with ALL that you said...

Except that quote which I quoted you on...

I agree with the fact that the salesperson is doing his job.  I also agree that the dealership is there solely to sell cars, and that they need to sell cars any which way they see fit...

But...a dealership IS a store.

A dealership IS open DURING BUSINESS hours to ACCEPT POTENTIAL customers.

A POTENTIAL customer SHOULD be ABLE to VISIT a dealership DURING business hours...NOT before or AFTER business hours.

Yes...the salesman NEEDS to sell cars to live and he needs to do his job the way his boss tells him to. We discussed that.

As a potential customer though...

I NEED TO VISIT A DEALERSHIP WITHOUT THE CONSTANT HARASSING IF I WANT TO BUY THE CAR TODAY.

I NEED THE BREATHING ROOM TO SEE FOR MYSELF.

A SIMPLE NO THANX SHOULD BE ENOUGH...

If a dealership thinks that if a potential client leaves the dealership and that dealership equates THAT as a loss of a sale to another dealership...MAYBE THAT dealership should CHANGE the way they do business and leave the 1950s/1960s/1970s/1980s/1990s where they belong. IN THE PAST!!!

 

Yes. Yes. Yes.

I understand that there is a plethora of undetermined, uninformed morons out there that NEED this type of sales tactic even though they say they dont...

But...the salespeople and the managers NEED to IDENTIFY the differences between the many types of buyers...

The dealerships...should invest in TEACHING their salespeople HOW to sell to people in the 21st century.

The DEALERSHIPS need to get together ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY and CHANGE the INDUSTRY around...

INSTEAD OF FIGHTING with the PHOQUING customer...the PHOQUING INDUSTRY NEEDS TO CHANGE THIS! 

NO! Not the CUSTOMER...HE JUST WANTS TO BUY A PHOQUING CAR.

ITS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PHOQUING INDUSTRY TO CHANGE...

STOP BLAMING THE CUSTOMER AND PUTTING THE ONUS ON HIM!!! 

 

 

 

I'm not going to argue with you. Instead, I will reiterate my point-

 

If you do not like the idea of having to speak to someone who is doing their job, don't go while said person is there, ie- while the establishment is closed.

 

You can try to reason around that all you want, but if go to a place of business while they are open, employees there are going to do their job. That's just the way it is. If you can't accept that, don't go there while they are open.

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12 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

I'm not going to argue with you. Instead, I will reiterate my point-

 

If you do not like the idea of having to speak to someone who is doing their job, don't go while said person is there, ie- while the establishment is closed.

 

You can try to reason around that all you want, but if go to a place of business while they are open, employees there are going to do their job. That's just the way it is. If you can't accept that, don't go there while they are open.

I will say that I have always set the ground rules when I visit a dealership. I tell the salesperson right up front what I want to do, how I want to do it and the space I need to do it.

I no longer feel harassed as I make the rules very clear and if they break them, I move onto another dealership. Many options for buying an auto out there and if one dealership is a PITA, move on and give your money to the place that will respect you and earn it.

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2 minutes ago, dfelt said:

I will say that I have always set the ground rules when I visit a dealership. I tell the salesperson right up front what I want to do, how I want to do it and the space I need to do it.

I no longer feel harassed as I make the rules very clear and if they break them, I move onto another dealership. Many options for buying an auto out there and if one dealership is a PITA, move on and give your money to the place that will respect you and earn it.

 

Which is precisely what I advised in my first post. 

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On 3/21/2018 at 4:54 PM, trinacriabob said:

Man, I hate going to the dealerships at night when the car doors are locked and you can't really get a feel for the car and I hate having to wait an entire year between auto shows so I can cut loose like a kid in a candy store, but also have to part with some coin for the hassle free privilege.  What do you do when you visit car dealerships out of curiosity and are subjected to a "turnover?"

I couldn't agree with this any more! :thumbsup::thumbsup:

On 3/24/2018 at 6:07 PM, oldshurst442 said:

A SIMPLE NO THANX SHOULD BE ENOUGH...

It never is a a dealership..sadly.. I've almost never had a true "hassle free" experience at a car dealership. 

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The issue is that the ground rules have been stated (I state them upon beginning to speak to a salesperson) and they then proceed to break them because that's the way they've been trained or it's their protocol.  It sounds like a conflict of interests between what the customer wants and the dealership wants from the get-go. 

The absolute worst, as I mentioned above, is when you're out of town (and you tell them you're from out of town and just looking with no intention to buy) and you go into a dealership, perhaps near your hotel, and they pull this crap. 

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Why wouldn't somebody want to sit in something they might buy in the next year?

 Instead of being like "most" people and not properly planning large purchases, one decides to plan out a 5 year, $20-50,000 purchase, and it's odd that they'd want to check something out ahead of time? 

Seems like they're trying to be responsible and instead are hassled because that's what dealerships do, most of the time

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I remember in olden days, car dealerships were closed on Sundays and you could drive around the lot after hours and look at cars up close...and in small towns, the used cars on the lot were often unlocked.    Nowadays, car dealers tend to be open 7 days a week and have gates so when they are closed, you can't drive on the lot. 

I do agree w/ being able to sit in and check out a vehicle up close if it's something you plan to consider buying.  As far as my GC purchase, I'd sat in the Wk2 GCs at new car shows in the past, studied them online quite a bit, rode in a coworker's '14, and having owned an older GC for almost 17 years, I knew pretty much I wanted another GC with some specific options (sunroof, CD player, nav, light leather interior, towing package, V6, 4x4, etc).

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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1 minute ago, ccap41 said:

Why wouldn't somebody want to sit in something they might buy in the next year?

 Instead of being like "most" people and not properly planning large purchases, one decides to plan out a 5 year, $20-50,000 purchase, and it's odd that they'd want to check something out ahead of time? 

Seems like they're trying to be responsible and instead are hassled because that's what dealerships do, most of the time

 

If you are a year away from buying something, you have absolutely NO place on a dealer lot other than for service or to buy parts. Don't even try to pull that BS line as an argument. You don't have to worry about me pressuring you for a sale, anyone who tells me they are a year away from buying I cordially give them a card and tell them to have a nice day. I, and any other good salesman have less than 0 interest in wasting time with someone who is a year away from buying a car.

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2 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

If you are a year away from buying something, you have absolutely NO place on a dealer lot other than for service or to buy parts. Don't even try to pull that BS line as an argument. You don't have to worry about me pressuring you for a sale, anyone who tells me they are a year away from buying I cordially give them a card and tell them to have a nice day. I, and any other good salesman have less than 0 interest in wasting time with someone who is a year away from buying a car.

That's just a dick thing to even think. 

Somebody shouldn't go to a dealership unless they're looking to purchase immediately. GTFO with that crap. 

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4 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

If you are a year away from buying something, you have absolutely NO place on a dealer lot other than for service or to buy parts. Don't even try to pull that BS line as an argument. You don't have to worry about me pressuring you for a sale, anyone who tells me they are a year away from buying I cordially give them a card and tell them to have a nice day. I, and any other good salesman have less than 0 interest in wasting time with someone who is a year away from buying a car.

A salesman with a shitty attitude like that should just GFT...

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40 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

That's just a dick thing to even think. 

Somebody shouldn't go to a dealership unless they're looking to purchase immediately. GTFO with that crap. 

 

See, in your haste to be defensive, you are now putting words in my mouth. Point to where I said you should only go if you are about to purchase immediately. I'll wait.

39 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

A salesman with a shitty attitude like that should just GFT...

 

It's not a shitty attitude. It's customers being shitty and wasting someone's time.

 

37 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

And they wonder why people hate salesmen? 

 

And customers wonder why salesmen hate them?

 

Two way street buddy.

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10 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

 

It's not a shitty attitude. It's customers being shitty and wasting someone's time.

 

Of what value is the salesman's time? They exist to serve customers.    And the customer's time is usually way more valuable than some sales resource...

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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7 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

Of what value is the salesman's time? They exist to serve customers.    And the customer's time is usually way more valuable than some sales resource...

 

That's a real shitty way of looking at something. And you want to make salesmen out to be bad guys. You don't even care about the fact you are wasting their time that they could be spending with a serious customer. And you know....getting paid. Which is why they have a job.

 

And the customer's time must not be that important, because it's a waste of it, too. :AH-HA:

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Two things:

1.  If told up front, the salesperson CAN give you a card, invite you to look around, ask if you have questions, and ask you for your business when you are ready to buy.  That said, I don't buy without having test driven what I intend to buy via a rental of at least 100 miles.  That's how it was with my last 3 cars. 

2.  I almost could see buying a place to live (#1 purchase) more quickly than buying a car (#2 purchase).  The amount of time required of the salesperson in #1 is a lot more involved than for #2 and they need to have passed a test to sell property.  Also, it probably won't depreciate.  As for a property, you can walk around the outside and almost preview the floor plan just from how the windows and doors are laid out.  The few times I've done it, I walked around and walked around the outside and got a good gut feel and, after seeing it inside, which was no surprise, that was it.

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