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regfootball

FWD cars that would have the biggest sales

49 posts in this topic

regfootball    234

remember I am not a huge RWD fan but I thought this would be a fun discussion.

What FWD cars now we reap the biggest sales and image benefits had the car been designed with RWD?

The rule is the car would have the same powertrains (engine and tranny) as offered now. Styling would remain the same, inside and out. The only change is the drive wheels!

You can even do a top 10 list if you like!

GO PANTHER!

Edited by regfootball

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Hmmm... great concept.

1. Chevy Impala

2. Cadillac DTS

3. Acura TL

4. Chevrolet Monte Carlo

5. Toyota Celica

6. Nissan Maxima

7. Hyundai Azera

8. Pontiac Grand Prix

9. Ford 500

10. Mazda 6

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ocnblu    733

Sixty8, did you take a peek at my hard drive?

Except switch "Celica" to "tC" :AH-HA_wink:

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Sixty8, did you take a peek at my hard drive?

Except switch "Celica" to "tC" :AH-HA_wink:

Except making a Scion RWD would add weight and cost, but I get your point. Funny thing is, I think 99.99% of the people on here agree the Impala should be RWD. Hell when I first saw the thread I knew people were gonna say Impala. :P

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mjdecker    0

-NEW-

1. Monte Carlo/Impala (I consider them essentially one car, coupe/sedan)

2. Mazda 6

3. Nissan Maxima

4. Chevy Cobalt

5. Scion tC

6. Pointiac G6

*. My bro wants a xB if in RWD if it were Larger

-OLDER-

Cadillac Eldorado

Buick Riviera

Pontiac Grand Am/Oldsmobile Alero/Achieva :P

Grand Prix/Buick Regal

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Croc    268

ok...i think this was a realistic question, not one for fantasyland. G5 sales would not grow if it were RWD. Riviera/Toronado/Eldorado wouldn't experience RWD sales growth...why? because their mojo was being the first mainstream FWD vehicles back in the 60s. Wanting them RWD just displays a gross ignorance.

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turbo200    6

the answer is no one knows. this is an experiment that is yet to be performed, so no one here, except for insiders with access to marketing research would know the real answer.

I think a G5 with a totally different approach to product positioning and design would do much better than the current approach. Let's say a hot small, AWD/RWD sedan with a turbo engine, and REAL design, REAL quality, and REAL performance would sell at least 100k units a year. Here's my rule of thumb: if Subaru, with its limited dealer network, high prices, and, in few cases, to some people, still unknown reliability record [simply because they have no experience with the brand, nor know anyone with it]....if Subaru can sell 25k WRXs, Pontiac, with a much hotter design, great quality and performance, and a good price, and huge dealer network and recognition, can sell a hell of a lot more. The same is true with a coupe. Just start the price low. A lot of people who have experience with GM, have positive experience.

Unless people present some real evidence here, then it's all based in nothing.

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OCNBLU:

Great minds think alike. If either the Celica or

the tC were to go RWD the rear wheel would

have to be pushed forward about a foot, no

rear overhang is never productive for RWD.

-OLDER-

Cadillac Eldorado

Buick Riviera

Pontiac Grand Am/Oldsmobile Alero/Achieva :P

Grand Prix/Buick Regal

Agreed... I think a RWD Cobalt would be awsome

but if there was one Chevy except the Aveo that

I would keep FWD (if I couldn't have an all RWD

lineup) then it would be the Cobalt.

But still, a 21st century Datsun 510 of some sort

would be deeee-luxe.

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turbo200    6

ok...i think this was a realistic question, not one for fantasyland.  G5 sales would not grow if it were RWD.  Riviera/Toronado/Eldorado wouldn't experience RWD sales growth...why? because their mojo was being the first mainstream FWD vehicles back in the 60s.  Wanting them RWD just displays a gross ignorance.

nobody cares that they were FWD except for diehards here. And they don't have unlimited bank accounts to buy every car GM makes twice. Wanting them RWD displays a cautious understanding of platform dynamics and the luxury azspect of these cars.

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Croc    268

nobody cares that they were FWD except for diehards here. And they don't have unlimited bank accounts to buy every car GM makes twice. Wanting them RWD displays a cautious understanding of platform dynamics and the luxury azspect of these cars.

Yea, except he was talking about the older ones, hence the -OLDER CARS- tag.

Yea, before the 1980s FWD onslaught people cared about the drivetrain because of their flat floor as well as superior traction in the winter. Maybe you should know what you're talking about before you comment. FWD traction WAS their main luxury feature back in the day. :rolleyes:

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turbo200    6

the answer is no one knows. this is an experiment that is yet to be performed, so no one here, except for insiders with access to marketing research would know the real answer.

I think a G5 with a totally different approach to product positioning and design would do much better than the current approach. Let's say a hot small, AWD/RWD sedan with a turbo engine, and REAL design, REAL quality, and REAL performance would sell at least 100k units a year. Here's my rule of thumb: if Subaru, with its limited dealer network, high prices, and, in few cases, to some people, still unknown reliability record [simply because they have no experience with the brand, nor know anyone with it]....if Subaru can sell 25k WRXs, Pontiac, with a much hotter design, great quality and performance, and a good price, and huge dealer network and recognition, can sell a hell of a lot more. The same is true with a coupe. Just start the price low. A lot of people who have experience with GM, have positive experience.

Unless people present some real evidence here, then it's all based in nothing.

One more thing I didn't add. Especially, in the Midwest, but around the country too just not as much, Pontiac has acceptance in the youth crowd, thanks to the GTO and Solstice, and years of "sinister" design, whether you take it that way or not, and whether they were successful at being sinister or not [a lot of the times, in recent times, imo, no].

They still have that. And building upon it with a RWD sedan priced around the Civic bracket, say 16k-22k with the uplevel turbo sedan rounding out the lineup. Of course all the safety and quality requirements need to be met at the gate for this car to get through.

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turbo200    6

Yea, except he was talking about the older ones, hence the -OLDER CARS- tag.

Yea, before the 1980s FWD onslaught people cared about the drivetrain because of their flat floor as well as superior traction in the winter.  Maybe you should know what you're talking about before you comment.  FWD traction WAS their main luxury feature back in the day. :rolleyes:

okay whateva

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Camino LS6    866

I would call the Monte Carlo (especially the SS) a given for increased sales. The rest are huge question marks. Some of them would become collectible legends down the road though, regardless of sales.

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Croc    268

I would call the Monte Carlo (especially the SS) a given for increased sales. The rest are huge question marks. Some of them would become collectible legends down the road though, regardless of sales.

Agreed. Monte and Impy should go RWD really...

But I'd be hesitant to make anything less than a fullsizer RWD simply due to the fact that for traction purposes the extra weight is needed and anything smaller would be too unstable in adverse conditions for most of America. RWD is best suited for performance cars and cars likely used for towing...as well as big sedans/coupes. But the midsized and smaller stuff really should be FWD, unless it's like the Solstice and is explicitly a warm weather vehicle.

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ok...i think this was a realistic question, not one for fantasyland.  G5 sales would not grow if it were RWD.  Riviera/Toronado/Eldorado wouldn't experience RWD sales growth...why? because their mojo was being the first mainstream FWD vehicles back in the 60s.  Wanting them RWD just displays a gross ignorance.

Toronado was the only one of the three that was birthed

with FWD. The Eldorado name was around for a decade

& a half before the car was switched to FWD, Riviera

was the one hold out of the three, it sucumbed to FWD in

1979.

That aside the Toronado was cool FWD vehicle because

it was developed in a time when FWD was a novelty... it

was a very revolutionary setup that shared more with

the Cord 810& Cord L-29 with their reverse mounted

motors than with today's FWD transverse mounted cars.

A RWD Eldorado would absolutely work today, so would

a Riviera, the Toronado would seem a little weird with

RWD but it wouild be less weird and "wrong" than a FWD

Impala SS with a supercharged V6 or a FWD Grand Prix.

Agreed.  Monte and Impy should go RWD really...

But I'd be hesitant to make anything less than a fullsizer RWD simply due to the fact that for traction purposes the extra weight is needed and anything smaller would be too unstable in adverse conditions for most of America.

Spoken like a true Californian. I never realised the BMW

3-series, Mercedes C-class, Lexus IS300, Datsun 510,

pre-mid 80s Celicas, early 60s Pontiac Tempest, Chevy II,

early 60s Buick Skylark, Olds F-85, Ford Falcon, Mercury

Comet, BMW 2002, Datsun 210/610/810/Maxima, Hyundai

Pony, Nash Metropolitan & about a million other compact

cars with RWD were never driven through the snow or

used in the poor winters of the northeast.

[/sarcasm]

Ever seen a movie that takes place in NYC in the winter

from the 1970s?

There's 14 inches of snow on the streets and there's an

MGB-GT and a bunch of RWD Japanese cars sandwiched

between a '62 Tempest & '73 BMW 2002 all with salt &

snow up to their door handles.

Edited by Sixty8panther

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Flybrian    0

Spoken like a true Californian. I never realised the BMW

3-series, Mercedes C-class, Lexus IS300, Datsun 510,

pre-mid 80s Celicas, early 60s Pontiac Tempest, Chevy II,

early 60s Buick Skylark, Olds F-85, Ford Falcon, Mercury

Comet, BMW 2002, Datsun 210/610/810/Maxima, Hyundai

Pony, Nash Metropolitan & about a million other compact

cars with RWD were never driven through the snow or

used in the poor winters of the northeast.

How many of those piece of $h! cars even exist?

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mrmonte    0

You guys want to see a cool movie from the 70's filmed in NY. Go rent The seven ups it just came out on DVD. Great car chase in there involving a 72 Bonneville and 72 Ventura.

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Flybrian    0

Additionally, Croc, Sixty is right on one account - only the Toronado debuted with front-wheel drive. All GM's other personal coupes of the time (Monte Carlo, Grand Prix, Riviera, and Eldorado) were rear-wheel drive until the 1970s/80s/90s, whatever the case may be.

Also, Sixty, in no way would a front-wheel drive Toronado be "weird" or "wrong." If it were rear-wheel drive, it would not be a Toronado.

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I'd love to see a 21st century Toronado in FRONT or REAR

wheel drive, but in any case make the engine mounted in

a north-south configuration!

As far as those cars on the list: most of them DON'T exist

but that's not the point. They DID exist at one point and

they sold well and were driven through the snow and sleet

& slush and ice just like all the otehr RWD cars form the

60s & 70s.

We're starving for RWD compacts these days, only Toyota

& BMW seem willing to give us some. And I'd rather not

buy a Lexus IS so that leaves me with BMW, BMW or BMW.

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Flybrian    0

I'd love to see a 21st century Toronado in FRONT or REAR

wheel drive, but in any case make the engine mounted in

a north-south configuration!

If you have no problem with a rear-wheel drive Toronado, then I don't see why you have a problem with today's front-wheel drive Monte Carlo. If anything, a rear-wheel drive Toronado would be more of a travesty because FWD was its biggest, most lauded feature while RWD was simply how things were done then, not 'special' in that sense.

As far as those cars on the list: most of them DON'T exist

but that's not the point. They DID exist at one point and

they sold well and were driven through the snow and sleet

& slush and ice just like all the otehr RWD cars form the

60s & 70s.

Yeah, but a Hyundai Pony? A crop of $h!box Datsuns? And a Nash?! C'mon. These are likely the worst examples anyone can use because drivetrain configuration notwithstanding, no one wants junk like that anymore. Incidently, Ponies and those Datsuns were replaced by FWD models that sold even better. Better off to use performance and handling to sell RWD rather than "well, it was done then, you pussies."

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Enzora    0

If you have no problem with a rear-wheel drive Toronado, then I don't see why you have a problem with today's front-wheel drive Monte Carlo. If anything, a rear-wheel drive Toronado would be more of a travesty because FWD was its biggest, most lauded feature while RWD was simply how things were done then, not 'special' in that sense.

But the reasons that the Toro was FWD are pretty much moot now, with traction control and superior tires and suspensions. If a new Toro were to be made (never gonna happen, but this site is half fantasyland anyway, so let's just pretend) then I can't see why a RWD version would be wrong at all. Tradition is just as dumb a reason to make a FWD car as it is for making a RWD car.

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Croc    268

Additionally, Croc, Sixty is right on one account - only the Toronado debuted with front-wheel drive. All GM's other personal coupes of the time (Monte Carlo, Grand Prix, Riviera, and Eldorado) were rear-wheel drive until the 1970s/80s/90s, whatever the case may be.

Also, Sixty, in no way would a front-wheel drive Toronado be "weird" or "wrong." If it were rear-wheel drive, it would not be a Toronado.

Technically, yes. My main point though was that the FWD models were FWD before the onslaught of FWD on the marketplace, and as a result, retrofitting those old cars for RWD defeats their original purpose.

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