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    LA Auto Show: 2017 Fiat 124 Spider


    • Fiat + Mazda Miata = 124 Spider


    What might have been one of the worst-kept secrets in the automotive world has finally been revealed today at the LA Auto Show.

     

    This is the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider which is the result of the partnership between Fiat and Mazda. You might remember this vehicle was originally destined for Alfa Romeo a few years back, before Alfa decided to do their own Spider and the project was shifted to Fiat.

     

    The first thing you notice about the 124 Spider is the polarizing design. Fiat says the design pays homage to the original 124 Spider from the sixties with an upright front end and rounded headlights. Towards the back is an oddly shaped trunk lid and rectangular taillights.

     

    While the Miata and 124 Spider use the same 90.9-inch wheelbase, the 124 Spider is about 5.5-inches longer than the Miata thanks to all of that new sheet metal.

     

    The 124 Spider's interior is the same as you'll find in the Miata. Aside from a Fiat badge on the steering wheel, everything else is pure Mazda.

     

    At least the powertrain is all Fiat. A turbocharged 1.4L MultiAir four-cylinder from the 500 Abarth provides 160 horsepower and 184 pound-feet of torque. There will be a choice of either a six-speed manual or automatic.

     

    Fiat will be launching the 124 Spider next summer. Now the first 124 models will be offered in a limited-edition Prima Edizione Lusso trim finished in a blue color and having individually numbered badges.

     

    Source: Fiat

     

     

    Press Release is on Page 2


     

    All-new 2017 Fiat 124 Spider Revives Legendary Nameplate with Iconic Italian Styling and Dynamic Driving Experience

    • 2017 Fiat 124 Spider returns nearly 50 years after original introduction
    • Revival of roadster continues expansion of FIAT brand in North America
    • Delivers iconic Italian style with modern adaptation of original Spider legend
    • Powered by turbocharged MultiAir 1.4-liter engine for 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque, available with manual or automatic transmission
    • Available with an array of safety and security features, plus technologies for added comfort and convenience
    • First 124 units will be available as limited-production Prima Edizione Lusso


    Auburn Hills, Mich., Nov 18, 2015 - The all-new 2017 Fiat 124 Spider revives the storied nameplate, bringing its classic Italian styling and performance to a new generation. Paying homage to the original 124 Spider nearly 50 years after its introduction, the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider delivers the ultimate Italian roadster experience with driving excitement, technology and safety combined with iconic Italian design.

     


    "There's no better way to celebrate 50 years of the Fiat 124 Spider than to bring back this iconic roadster, pairing its Italian styling of the past with all of the modern performance and technology of today," said Olivier François, Head of FIAT Brand, FCA – Global. "The 124 Spider expands the FIAT family, bringing to market yet another head-turning, fun-to-drive vehicle for our customers."

     

    Engaging driving dynamics through thoughtful engineering
    In North America, the Fiat 124 Spider is available with the proven 1.4-liter MultiAir Turbo four-cylinder engine, the engine's first application in a rear-wheel-drive vehicle. The engine delivers 160 horsepower and 184 lb.-ft. of torque, and is available with a six-speed manual transmission or a six-speed automatic transmission.

     

    The 124 Spider's suspension uses a double-wishbone layout in front and a multi-link in the rear, specifically tuned for greater stability while braking and turning. Steering is light and responsive with the use of an electric power assist (dual pinion) system.

     

    The steering and suspension setup, lightweight frame, balanced weight distribution and turbocharged engine combine for a dynamic driving experience. Noise vibration and harshness (NVH) enhancements, including an acoustic front windshield and insulation treatments, also help to deliver a refined, quiet ride.

     

    For an open-air driving experience, the Fiat 124 Spider's soft convertible top is easy to operate and requires minimal force, much like the original Spider's top.

     

    Loaded with safety, security and technology features
    The all-new roadster is available with an array of safety and security features, including adaptive front headlamps, Blind-spot Monitoring, Rear Cross Path detection and ParkView rear backup camera. A high-strength body helps to dissipate energy while optimizing occupant protection.

     

    The Fiat 124 Spider is also available with technology features for added comfort and convenience, including the FIAT Connect 7.0 system with 7-inch touchscreen display, multimedia control, Bluetooth connectivity, heated seats and Keyless Enter 'n Go.

     

    A Bose premium sound system with nine speakers, including dual headrest speakers, is also available for superior sound quality even with the top down.

     

    Design pays homage to past with modern interpretation of styling cues
    The all-new Fiat 124 Spider, designed at Centro Stile in Turin, Italy, borrows cues from the original Spider – widely considered one of Fiat's most beautiful cars of all time – and reinterprets them for today. The 2017 124 Spider has a timeless low-slung presence, with a classically beautiful bodyside, well-balanced proportions and a sporty cabin-to-hood ratio. Features like the hexagonal upper grille and grille pattern, "power domes" on the front hood and sharp horizontal rear lamps call to mind details of the historic Spider.

     

    The interior is crafted and designed to focus on the occupants, with premium soft-touch materials throughout. Ergonomics were applied to emphasize the driving experience and ensure easy operation of the steering wheel, pedals and shifter while driving.

     

    The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider is available in two trim levels: Classica and Lusso. Each model is available in six exterior paint colors, including Rosso Passione (Red Clear Coat), Bianco Gelato (White Clear Coat), Nero Cinema (Jet Black Metallic), Grigio Argento (Gray Metallic), Grigio Moda (Dark Gray Metallic) and Bronzo Magnetico (Bronze Metallic). The Lusso ("Luxury") model is also available in tri-coat Bianco Perla (Crystal White Pearl).

     

    Special edition gives enthusiasts the chance to own one of the first 2017 Fiat 124 Spiders
    To celebrate the return of the classic nameplate, the first 124 vehicles will be offered as a limited-edition Prima Edizione Lusso, as shown at the 2015 Los Angeles Auto Show. Each will be individually numbered with a commemorative badge and available in exclusive Azzurro Italia (Blue) exterior paint with premium leather seats in Saddle. Owners who purchase a Prima Edizione will also receive limited-edition items, including wearables and a poster. For more information about ordering a Fiat 124 Spider Prima Edizione, interested customers can sign up for updates at http://www.fiatusa.com.

     

    The all-new Fiat 124 Spider will arrive in FIAT studios in North America in summer 2016.

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    I think it's really interesting. Mazda does so well with engineering products. The entire brand exists because of its market niche.

     

    Which means they can effectively sell the underpinnings of their vehicles to other manufacturers without any fear really of true, direct competition. Niche engineering, sell it to the big boys, profit.

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    I have mixed feelings on this. I love the idea of turbo-charging a Miata, but I'd rather Mazda engineer it. This is the part where I'd normally say the opposite for the design, except... I feel like Mazda also has the edge here with their Kodo design. So, essentially, what we have here is a slightly uglier, likely far less reliable, but slightly angrier version of a car nearly everyone loves. Uh... win? I... guess?

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    I actually really like it.   For me, the Miata has always check all the right boxes for the engineering, but in all versions including the current one, I could never get into the styling of it. 

     

    Also, this is likely to be the most reliable model in the Fiat lineup by far.

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    I kinda wonder what pricing is going to be like.  They'd have a hard time making it a premium price over the Miata because of the Fiat badge I would think. 

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    Where's the market for this vehicle? That's the issue. So many niche vehicles Fiat is making thus far. 

     

    Where's the meat? I mean delaying vital products for pipe dreams isn't cool. 

     

    Okay maybe the Giulia was all worth it. But they gotta do some major product crashing for the Giulia. Get it here ASAP to drive attention back to FCA US. 

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    I thought it was going to be horrible. These pics appear to prove me wrong. Actually, I'm impressed that the stylists were able to give this car a completely different vibe than the Miata. Given the nature of Fiat's powertrains I expect that will also apply to the driving experience. The Abarth version that will inevitably come may actually get me behind the wheel for a test drive.

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    Your Miata will probably handle better too, to be honest. The Multiair in this car has an iron block. Good for boost, not so much for balance.

    Edited by El Kabong
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    This thing is ugly as hell. Major wasted opportunity. Guess we're gonna have to hope Alfa gets their hands on this platform to get a car off it that has enticing looks and performance.

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    This thing is ugly as hell. Major wasted opportunity. Guess we're gonna have to hope Alfa gets their hands on this platform to get a car off it that has enticing looks and performance.

     

    They won't. They already were working on this car and then gave it to Fiat instead.  Alfa is apparently getting their own platform. 

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    This thing is ugly as hell. Major wasted opportunity. Guess we're gonna have to hope Alfa gets their hands on this platform to get a car off it that has enticing looks and performance.

     

    They won't. They already were working on this car and then gave it to Fiat instead.  Alfa is apparently getting their own platform. 

     

     

    That makes no sense to me, but what the hell do I know?

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    Your Miata will probably handle better too, to be honest. The Multiair in this car has an iron block. Good for boost, not so much for balance.

    I'm thinking so as well. The added weight of the engine plus the five-plus inches they slapped on the front overhang is making me feel like that this thing is going to put on some serious pounds just in the front end. As a cruiser it would be awesome but if you care about cornering ability, and maybe even tracking the car, I'd pick the much more attractive Miata.

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    I rather take the Abarth engine and drop into a Miata. Best of both worlds in my book.

    This is what I thought while i was reading.

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    I like the Miata more.  I don't think the Fiat really looks all that good, and it doesn't really scream Fiat to me other than the grille opening.  But they need product to keep the dealerships open.

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