• Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0

    Acura Tweaking The ILX To Provide Better Value


    • The Acura ILX will be getting more value in the future.

    By William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    January 9, 2013

    The Acura ILX hasn't been the success that the company has hoped for. Acura only sold 12,251 ILXs in 2012, which is way off the 30,000 goal they had set for the year. Acura admits this freely.

    “(The ILX is) not hitting our sales expectations. Consumers have told us they like the 2.4L and they wish they had an automatic, but they say the midrange vehicle is underpowered and they don’t see the value in it.” American Honda President John Mendel said to reporters at November’s Los Angeles Auto Show.

    The ILX comes in three different variations: a base 2.0L with an automatic transmission, a 2.4L with a six-speed manual, and a 1.5L hybrid model with a continuously variable transmission.

    This isn't the first mistake Acura has made with the ILX. Reviewers have complained that 2.4L doesn't offer the technology package that brings such features as navigation while the 2.0L and Hybrid offer it.

    “We’re doing some value enhancements on the car. We’re planning some as we go forward. But I think, overall, we have a good plan for ILX. It is bringing in buyers to Acura we had wanted, as in first-time luxury (buyers) or move-ups," Mendel said.

    Hopefully those enhancements include an automatic and a tech package for the 2.4L.

    Source: Wards Auto

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

    0


    Sign in to follow this  
    Followers 0


    User Feedback


    The ILX seems rather redundant w/ the TSX.

    Well there's speculation that the TSX and TL would merge into one model, thus giving space to the ILX... Whether that comes true or not, we shall see.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Offering the 2.4 liter ILX in the USA, or any 4-door passenger car for that matter, w/o an automatic transmission in the USA is moronic. 90% of the driver's can't drive a manual in this country!

    3

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    ILX is not a TSX likely because the TSX chassis was too expensive, they wanted to cheapen it.

    I am slightly flabberghasted still at Honda's lack of turbo offings in the market. They dumped it on the RDX. Which for that was fine. But the ILX should have a turbo mill, i think. It's sorta expected in the lux market.

    BUT zOMG I BET IT HAS VTEC!!!!!

    Honda wanted the 2.0 as typical to keep mpg up and distance it from the TSX, which is not a heckuva lot larger.

    Honda, how about return to this for Acura.

    Integra

    Vigor

    Legend

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    It's amusing how surprised Honda is when they introduce ugly, uncompetitive vehicles and then they don't sell. I haven't driven an ILX, but I was not impressed when I sat in one.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Civic Si with the 2.4L doesn't come with an automatic either but you can get NAV. The upgraded trim, sound deadening and removal of sport suspension are not worth an extra 5 grand.



    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I think overall its a nice looking car, but whats with that knee-height doorhandle? Unless this car is stupidly tall, thats a serious design flaw that just looks stupid.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I drove the turbo. You *have* to drive it like you stole it just to keep up with traffic. I was following a new Explorer and working the shifter hard just to keep pace.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Word to the wise from your resident Acura dude...just because articles come out using quotations from Acura about changing things, then not, then yes again but other stuff, doesn't necessarily mean so.

    There has been chatter about the 2.0L for a while, Acura included. But it performs well in the car and would simply be even better with another gear, and direct injection. As is, peppy, efficient, and Honda smooth best describe it. I've not had any complaints about a lack of power from my clients considering or driving them. The car is smoother and quieter in ways than the larger TSX, but back to back where the TSX has a sport edge and firmer, communicative feel and more power (a few Acura drivers comparing have said "it's more BMW like" as the best way to explain), the ILX is softer and not as edgy.

    The TSX is going to remain, even as the price point of ILX to TSX causes confusion. The ILX should be just a bit less. The TSX is an upgrade in vehicle, but also very expensive to build and ship over from Japan...Acura's main issue with it right now. Lots of possibilities here.

    It's been an interesting car, just so new it has to catch traction. There is always room for advancement and adding features, updating powertrains, etc. but that's a good thing. To say the 2.0L will go away or was a mistake, that the 2.4L will be standard, etc. are just not correct yet. Intelligent blabber by Honda and writers to perk up peoples ears a bit.

    In the past month the ILX has caught nice traction, more so than before, part due to even more attractive leases and part them being on road. Hope to see it continue to advance, and it will. Not an issue like the 2012 Civic, by any means.

    We shall see. Watch and wait. Fun little car. Not necessarily what all previous larger Acura vehicle owners would expect or take to, but is getting new people from other brands into the brand.

    As for Turbo, not saying its a bad thing, but there are better options available and mainly by way of direct injection and newer transmissions. Turbos aren't for everyone and although our past RDX clients like them, the turbo surge and lower fuel economy of the last one weren't right for all. Too much for a smaller car, I think, that 2.3L at least.

    Edited by caddycruiser
    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Last rumor I've heard included dropping the 2.0L so that the 2.4L is standard across the board, and the base model with a $26795 MSRP will remain but drop the cloth/manual driver's seat and get the leather and power seat from the 2nd model up standard.

    We'll see. Now that its rated 35 mpg with the 2.0L, the ratings will need to drop if the engine does get bigger. Acura/Honda at least wait until very late to release details, and then the cars go on sale days to weeks after, right away or soon after. Wish other makers did that.

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Did anyone else have to Google "Acura ILX" to even know what this car was? Somehow I'd never heard of it. Perhaps that's part of the problem?

    0

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor




  • Popular Stories

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      When I last reviewed the Acura MDX back in 2014, I mentioned that it and the RDX crossover made up a majority of the brand’s sales. That’s still true in 2017 as both models currently make up 63.8 percent of Acura’s sales through the end of March. In closing my review, I said Acura focused on fixing the issues that hurt the MDX before and left other things well alone, creating a balanced luxury crossover. But does that still hold up in a field that has become very competitive in the past couple of years? It seemed a revisit was in order.
      Acura did a significant refresh for the 2017 MDX with the biggest change being the design. Up front, Acura has swapped the shield grille for a larger pentagonal grille from the 2016 Precision Concept. While the shield was considered by many to a bit polarizing and a turn-off, I find the new grille to be a bit cartoonish. It doesn’t really work with the rest of the MDX’s design. At least certain traits such as the ‘Jewel Eye’ headlights and sloping roofline are still here and still work. The interior hasn’t changed much since our last test and that’s both a good and bad thing. The good is the MDX’s material quality is towards the top of the class with a fair amount of leather and wood trim used throughout. Although considering the price tag of just over $59,000, it would have been nice if Acura added some more luxury touches. Those sitting up front or in the second-row will find plenty of room and a set of supportive seats. The MDX is one of the few models in the class that offers a third-row as standard, but it is best reserved for small kids or being folded into the floor to increase cargo space. The bad mostly deals with the AcuraLink infotainment system. This dual screen setup brings more headaches than any other system I have used. A perfect example is when you want to switch from music to a podcast on your USB device. You need to use the top screen and a control knob to go through the various menus to find the show you want to listen to. Not only is this pain, but it also creates a distraction when driving as your eyes are taken off from the road. I wish Acura would scrap this system and start back from square one. Power still comes from a 3.5L V6 offering 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque. A nine-speed automatic routes power to either the front-wheels or all four-wheels via Acura’s super-handling all-wheel drive (SH-AWD). Advanced models like ours come standard with a stop-start system.  The V6 in the MDX is such an impressive motor. Power delivery is quite strong throughout the rev band and the engine doesn’t make much noise during acceleration. However, the stop-start is a bit of a mess. It takes a few seconds for the system to realize that you took your foot off the brake before it restarts the engine. The system can be turned off which we recommend doing. The nine-speed automatic needs a bit work as well as we found shifts to be somewhat clunky at low speeds. Also, the transmission is slow to downshift when you need to make a pass. At least paddle shifters mounted on the steering wheel solves this issue somewhat as you can do it yourself. EPA fuel economy figures stand at 19 City/26 Highway/22 Combined when the MDX is equipped with SH-AWD. I got none too shabby 23 MPG average for the week. One area we’re glad to see Acura not messing with the MDX refresh is the suspension tuning. The MDX has stuck the right balance of comfort and handling. Some of this is credited to the Integrated Dynamics System (IDS) that alters various settings for the suspension, steering, and a few other items. This means the MDX can be tailored to deliver a sporty ride when driving down a curvy road and ironing out road imperfections when commuting. There is one big issue for the MDX, price. Our MDX Advance & Entertainment tester came with an as-tested price of $59,475 with destination. Considering what you get for the price and compare against other models, the MDX is a bit of a poor value. Stick with one of the lower trims. The Acura MDX stands in a bit of an odd middle ground, where it is above the mainstream, but below luxury competitors. It remains a very competent crossover that seems to do most things right. But we can’t help but wonder if Acura was given a bit more time to mess with the stop-start system and automatic transmission, along with making it slightly more luxurious, it could take it a bit further from the middle ground the MDX currently sits in. Disclaimer: Acura Provided the MDX, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Acura
      Model: MDX
      Trim: Advanced Entertainment SH-AWD
      Engine: 3.5L 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC V6
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 290 @ 6,200
      Torque @ RPM: 267 @ 4,700
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/26/22
      Curb Weight: 4,292 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lincoln, AL
      Base Price: $58,500
      As Tested Price: $59,475 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      When I last reviewed the Acura MDX back in 2014, I mentioned that it and the RDX crossover made up a majority of the brand’s sales. That’s still true in 2017 as both models currently make up 63.8 percent of Acura’s sales through the end of March. In closing my review, I said Acura focused on fixing the issues that hurt the MDX before and left other things well alone, creating a balanced luxury crossover. But does that still hold up in a field that has become very competitive in the past couple of years? It seemed a revisit was in order.
      Acura did a significant refresh for the 2017 MDX with the biggest change being the design. Up front, Acura has swapped the shield grille for a larger pentagonal grille from the 2016 Precision Concept. While the shield was considered by many to a bit polarizing and a turn-off, I find the new grille to be a bit cartoonish. It doesn’t really work with the rest of the MDX’s design. At least certain traits such as the ‘Jewel Eye’ headlights and sloping roofline are still here and still work. The interior hasn’t changed much since our last test and that’s both a good and bad thing. The good is the MDX’s material quality is towards the top of the class with a fair amount of leather and wood trim used throughout. Although considering the price tag of just over $59,000, it would have been nice if Acura added some more luxury touches. Those sitting up front or in the second-row will find plenty of room and a set of supportive seats. The MDX is one of the few models in the class that offers a third-row as standard, but it is best reserved for small kids or being folded into the floor to increase cargo space. The bad mostly deals with the AcuraLink infotainment system. This dual screen setup brings more headaches than any other system I have used. A perfect example is when you want to switch from music to a podcast on your USB device. You need to use the top screen and a control knob to go through the various menus to find the show you want to listen to. Not only is this pain, but it also creates a distraction when driving as your eyes are taken off from the road. I wish Acura would scrap this system and start back from square one. Power still comes from a 3.5L V6 offering 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque. A nine-speed automatic routes power to either the front-wheels or all four-wheels via Acura’s super-handling all-wheel drive (SH-AWD). Advanced models like ours come standard with a stop-start system.  The V6 in the MDX is such an impressive motor. Power delivery is quite strong throughout the rev band and the engine doesn’t make much noise during acceleration. However, the stop-start is a bit of a mess. It takes a few seconds for the system to realize that you took your foot off the brake before it restarts the engine. The system can be turned off which we recommend doing. The nine-speed automatic needs a bit work as well as we found shifts to be somewhat clunky at low speeds. Also, the transmission is slow to downshift when you need to make a pass. At least paddle shifters mounted on the steering wheel solves this issue somewhat as you can do it yourself. EPA fuel economy figures stand at 19 City/26 Highway/22 Combined when the MDX is equipped with SH-AWD. I got none too shabby 23 MPG average for the week. One area we’re glad to see Acura not messing with the MDX refresh is the suspension tuning. The MDX has stuck the right balance of comfort and handling. Some of this is credited to the Integrated Dynamics System (IDS) that alters various settings for the suspension, steering, and a few other items. This means the MDX can be tailored to deliver a sporty ride when driving down a curvy road and ironing out road imperfections when commuting. There is one big issue for the MDX, price. Our MDX Advance & Entertainment tester came with an as-tested price of $59,475 with destination. Considering what you get for the price and compare against other models, the MDX is a bit of a poor value. Stick with one of the lower trims. The Acura MDX stands in a bit of an odd middle ground, where it is above the mainstream, but below luxury competitors. It remains a very competent crossover that seems to do most things right. But we can’t help but wonder if Acura was given a bit more time to mess with the stop-start system and automatic transmission, along with making it slightly more luxurious, it could take it a bit further from the middle ground the MDX currently sits in. Disclaimer: Acura Provided the MDX, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Acura
      Model: MDX
      Trim: Advanced Entertainment SH-AWD
      Engine: 3.5L 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC V6
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 290 @ 6,200
      Torque @ RPM: 267 @ 4,700
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 19/26/22
      Curb Weight: 4,292 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lincoln, AL
      Base Price: $58,500
      As Tested Price: $59,475 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A
    • By William Maley
      The rivalry of the Chevrolet Camaro and Ford Mustang has been going for ages in the U.S. But now this fight has expanded into China.
      Automotive News reports that a growing group of Chinese buyers are being drawn towards to these models as the exude the no-apologies Americana attitude.
      "We're seeing the beginning of a muscle car culture here. Something that is uniquely American appeals to the Chinese consumer. The image that it relays to the automotive public is very positive," said James Chao, a China market auto analyst with IHS Markit.
      Sales of both models are small with Chevrolet only moving 2,000 Camaros since its launch 2011. Ford is doing slightly better with 6,200 Mustangs sold since its launch in 2015. In the first quarter, Mustang sales saw a 90 percent increase to 963 vehicles. Part of the reason for the slow sales comes down to the price. The Camaro starts about 399,900 yuan (about $58,000) - more than double of the base price of $26,900 in the U.S. The Mustang isn't that far behind, costing about $15 dollars less. Prices are increased due to a 25 percent import tariff on U.S. made vehicles, homologation and shipping fees, and Chinese buyers trending to splurge on higher-time models.
      But despite the low sales, the Camaro and Mustang are bringing buyers to dealers. These models act as eye candy to help draw shoppers into showrooms with the hope they'll purchase a vehicle, where it be the eye candy or something a little less exciting.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The rivalry of the Chevrolet Camaro and Ford Mustang has been going for ages in the U.S. But now this fight has expanded into China.
      Automotive News reports that a growing group of Chinese buyers are being drawn towards to these models as the exude the no-apologies Americana attitude.
      "We're seeing the beginning of a muscle car culture here. Something that is uniquely American appeals to the Chinese consumer. The image that it relays to the automotive public is very positive," said James Chao, a China market auto analyst with IHS Markit.
      Sales of both models are small with Chevrolet only moving 2,000 Camaros since its launch 2011. Ford is doing slightly better with 6,200 Mustangs sold since its launch in 2015. In the first quarter, Mustang sales saw a 90 percent increase to 963 vehicles. Part of the reason for the slow sales comes down to the price. The Camaro starts about 399,900 yuan (about $58,000) - more than double of the base price of $26,900 in the U.S. The Mustang isn't that far behind, costing about $15 dollars less. Prices are increased due to a 25 percent import tariff on U.S. made vehicles, homologation and shipping fees, and Chinese buyers trending to splurge on higher-time models.
      But despite the low sales, the Camaro and Mustang are bringing buyers to dealers. These models act as eye candy to help draw shoppers into showrooms with the hope they'll purchase a vehicle, where it be the eye candy or something a little less exciting.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)
    • By William Maley
      If the Volkswagen diesel emission scandal hasn't swayed you from wanting one, then you'll be happy to hear Volkswagen will once again be able to sell brand-new 2015 model year TDI models. Green Car Reports says near 11,000 TDI models will soon be back up for sale once they are updated with new software, making them legal.
      Volkswagen does caution those interested in picking up a new TDI to call their nearest dealership to see if they have any in stock.
      But that's not all. Volkswagen is offering some massive discounts on these models. CarsDirect reports that Volkswagen is offering 0% APR for up to 72 months and $5,000 cash bonus if you decide to buy. Interested in leasing one? Volkswagen will offer a cash bonus of $8,500. 
      There are a couple of caveats to this offer. First, you need to have an excellent credit history to qualify for either offer. Second is that Volkswagen isn't advertising this offer.
      "We will not be advertising the available incentives from our financing arm as they [sic] vehicle availability will vary per dealership," said Volkswagen spokeswoman Jeannine Ginivan.
      Source: Green Car Reports, CarsDirect

      View full article
  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)