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    William Maley

    Leaked: 2019 BMW 3-Series

      Whoops

    What you see before you is the next-generation BMW 3-Series, known as the G20 that will be debuting later this week at the Paris Motor Show. But renders from the configurator have leaked out and made their away on to various websites.

    The overall dimensions and profile of the G20 3-Series are reminiscent of the F30 generation. Up front, the 3-Series makes a callback to the larger 5-Series with wider kidney grilles, sculpted hood, and narrower headlights. The M Sport and M340i get a more aggressive front bumper treatment with faux mesh inserts in front of the wheels. A noticeable depression is applied to the bottom part of the doors.

    For the interior, BMW has gone for a modern and minimalistic look with sharp angles, large screens for the instrument cluster and infotainment system, and a small number of buttons. It appears all of the models in the photos have an automatic transmission, with some lacking a selector - though we believe that's more of error with the renderings.

    We'll have more details on the mechanical and other bits when the 3-Series debuts later this week.

    Source: Bimmerpost



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    Thanks @William Maley for pointing out the changes. My first impression was what has changed? 🤷‍♂️

    The more I looked at all the pics on the Bimmerpost site, I was able to pick them up, truly an evolution of the brand, not a revolution but then many like that. Should do BMW well. Mixed feeling on the dash.

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    Not surprised by the slow evolution of the design given the 5 series refresh that happened a year or so ago that was similar.

     

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    Well, it looks like a BMW.  I am not a big fan of the digital display behind the steering wheel, it doesn't seem to fit in right.  But nothing inside or out looks offensive, they are serving up what the people want, the formula isn't broken so no need to change it.

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    The competition isn't standing still.

    BMW has some gaping sales holes in it's lineup- holes that absolutely need to be changed up in the battle for '#1 luxury mainstream volume brand' with mercedes.

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    3 hours ago, balthazar said:

    The competition isn't standing still.

    BMW has some gaping sales holes in it's lineup- holes that absolutely need to be changed up in the battle for '#1 luxury mainstream volume brand' with mercedes.

    IS BMW THAT far behind Mercedes Benz in sales?  MB seems to be a luxury brand for almost every luxury buyer, whereas BMW is still luxury sports sedans (and the X SAVs).

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    The interior is a definite step up and now BMW’s look like they are the logical in between of Audi and Mercedes. 

     

    Which means this car is blah at best. But I think the exterior overall is still more attractive than the Mercedes but the Volvo S60 is still the ‘all-new for 2019’ styling champion of this class.

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    How does BMW realistically think they're going to surprise ANYONE with this car when it's the exact same stylistic concept running for -IDK- 15 years now? 'Leaked pics'; c'mon!

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    I like it, I think looks definitely improved over the previous generation. 

    Maybe being instantly recognizable as 3-series bimmer is not a bad thing.

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