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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Hyundai is Planning More Design Distinction For Their Models

      We're beginning to see this plan in action

    Chris Chapman, senior chief designer at Hyundai's Design Center has an ambitious plan for the coming years. He wants each Hyundai model to have their own visual identity.

    "We're going for more of this chess-piece rather than the family look. We're using consistently shared elements … but we're going to avoid this sort of Russian-doll approach to our vehicles in the future," Chapman told reporters at the media launch of the Kona EV.

    Designers will be tasked to give each model "a look that matches its intended use and customer." Take for example the Kona crossover which has a funky look that should appeal to a younger audience than the new Santa Fe. Another example is the Kona and Kona EV that have different design touches to set them apart.

    "Both kind of have extroverted design, but they're dressed differently for different demographic purposes," Chapman said.

    Part of Chapman's motivation for this comes from his past. As Roadshow notes, he worked as a designer at BMW during the Chris Bangle era which brought forth the problem of telling the difference between the 3, 5, and 7-Series. He said BMW referred to this as "Eine Wurst, drei Grosse" -- one sausage, three sizes. While he may not say it outright, reading between the lines reveals he would like to avoid this.

    Source: Roadshow



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    Right...and when Hyundai builds a distinctive car, Ocnblu and i will show up in matching Ford Focus electrics to celebrate. 

    Mixing BMW thinking in with Hyundai design...is turning my stomach before lunch...

    14 minutes ago, William Maley said:

     

    Designers will be tasked to give each model "a look that matches its intended use and customer."

    Source: Roadshow

     

    View full article

     

    What for gods sake is the design look for involuntarily celibate and overweight female office worker?

    ....ohh wait...that would be Kia Soul.  Maybe they can learn something from Kia...

    • Haha 2

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    Just now, dfelt said:

    So then every model has a distinct look and category for male, female and LGBTQA? 🤔

    The Hyundai models I like best have a Kia logo on them.

     

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    23 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    So no more "Same Sausage, different lengths" design?

    I guess we'll see.  

    Not very much, actually.

     

    10 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    The Hyundai models I like best have a Kia logo on them.

     

    One word...Stinger...that thing is gorgeous and i would love to own own.

    24 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    So no more "Same Sausage, different lengths" design?

    I guess we'll see.  

    historically Hyundai has had a lousy track record at building cars that are desirable from a styling standpoint.

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    Just now, Drew Dowdell said:

    The stinger looks good and drives well, but it's not really my style of car. The K900 is. 

    We really have different tastes in cars in many ways.

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    Having a diverse selection of styles of vehicles available is a good thing.  Would be boring if everyone liked the same thing.    Sometimes I want that chocolate wrapped bacon w/ jalapeño flavor, for example.  (had that exact snack at the Cleveland West Side Market a few weeks, ago, recommended).  

     

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    4 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    Absolutely.  I like puff-cruisers. 

    I am so spoiled on the big American sedans of the 60's and 70's that nothing else has ever come close.

    When they can build a car as sexy as my aunts Buick Wildcat, my neighbors 1970 Bonneville, my Grandfathers Olds 98....call me. These cars set the bar for me as a young boy...and budding enthusiast.

    Until then everything else in the puff cruiser realm  is a weak imitation.

    Sort of like wanting an autocross prepped Miata and getting a Barbie edition Fiat 500 Cabriolet...

    Both the Miata and 500 are small convertibles...but that is where the similarity ends.

    4 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    ew..:puke:

    Chocolate wrapped Bacon seems to fit well with the Barbie edition 500 Cabriolet.....just an idea no one should have tried.

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    1 hour ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Having a diverse selection of styles of vehicles available is a good thing.  Would be boring if everyone liked the same thing.    Sometimes I want that chocolate wrapped bacon w/ jalapeño flavor, for example.  (had that exact snack at the Cleveland West Side Market a few weeks, ago, recommended).  

     

    Those are the BOMB!

    If you ever get out to Seattle, John Howeys has a Tempura fried chocolate wrapped bacon with Jalapeno. It is awesome, comes with hot Maple Syrup! :P

    1 hour ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    ew..:puke:

    @A Horse With No Name

    Don't knock it till you try it. Very yummy, especially dipped in Maple Syrup. :P

    I would love a large Cadillac Brougham that has an adjustable suspension so when I want to, I can put it in V mode! :metal:

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    Stinger to me looks far too much like Optima 2.0 and the interior space utilization is suspect.  Not a fan of the dash either.

    I myself wouldn't look at a K900 until I see how good of deals occur on CPO used CT6 twin turbos the next year or two.....

    Edited by regfootball

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    You may have to go XT4 or XT5 to come close to those floaty luxoboats from 35-50 years ago.  Too bad most large sedans are an endangered species these days, especially those wit h high-torque engines (DOHC need not apply).

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    35 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

    You may have to go XT4 or XT5 to come close to those floaty luxoboats from 35-50 years ago.  

    Those are both too small and lightweight....

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    On 10/16/2018 at 7:39 PM, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Those are both too small and lightweight....

    You must have hated the Great Shrinking of 1977-79 on virtually all cars.

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    24 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

    You must have hated the Great Shrinking of 1977-79 on virtually all cars.

    It came off fairly well on the GM cars. With Ford the Thunderbird of 77 was the beginning of the end IMHO for desireable mainstream Ford passenger cars.

    On 10/16/2018 at 7:03 PM, regfootball said:

    Stinger to me looks far too much like Optima 2.0 and the interior space utilization is suspect.  Not a fan of the dash either.

    I myself wouldn't look at a K900 until I see how good of deals occur on CPO used CT6 twin turbos the next year or two.....

    In a bland market where I am reaching for product to like it is a rock star among cars.

    Next to a tri power 65 GTO 4 speed it looks like Nancy Pelosi in the buff.

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    The value equation on the Stinger will be good once the car hits discount phase.  And I do like it as a choice in the market that wants to find buyers interested in DRIVING.  Fewer and fewer of those choices these days.

    I think if merely the rear door opening for the window didn't have such a similar kink as the Optima, I would see it more as its own car.

    Edited by regfootball
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    On 10/16/2018 at 7:03 PM, regfootball said:

    Stinger to me looks far too much like Optima 2.0 and the interior space utilization is suspect.  Not a fan of the dash either.

    I myself wouldn't look at a K900 until I see how good of deals occur on CPO used CT6 twin turbos the next year or two.....

    I would buy a Lexus instead just for the resale and reliability factor. My daughter is an automotive claims adjuster and she tells me what they pay out when they total cars.

    Average Kia has the fair market resale value of a warm damp popsicle.

    1 minute ago, regfootball said:

    The value equation on the Stinger will be good once the car hits discount phase.  And I do like it as a choice in the market that wants to find buyers interested in DRIVING.  Fewer and fewer of those choices these days.

    Yeah...there is a part of me that could be passionate about a CPO stinger.

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    nudging back to Hyundai and design distinction. 

    I wonder what Hyundai designer Peter Schreyer thinks of this.  He's the one responsible for giving Genesis a more Audi styling and where most of the criticism originates that the Koreans are just trying to copy the Germans (they're not, they got a German designer).

     

     

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