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    Comparison: 2014 Honda Civic EX-L vs. 2014 Toyota Corolla S


    • Dueling Compact Sedans

    The Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla: the two best-selling compact models in the U.S. month after month; the two are on the top of the charts, usually one of the models being number one while the other sits in second place. It’s something that has confounded many automotive writers and enthusiasts as they believe there are better options out there. What they tend forget is those two vehicles have a reputation that very few can even dare match, which for most buyers counts massively.

    So what is it about these two vehicles that many people decide to purchase? Is it the name alone or something else? But also which one of these two vehicles is deserving of your money? I went back to back with the redesigned Toyota Corolla and Honda Civic to answer these questions.

    Exterior:

    2013 saw Honda give the Civic an emergency update to better combat the swath of new compact models that arrived on the scene. This begins with exterior with a new front that features a revised hood, mesh grille with smiling chrome surround; and set of reshaped headlights. Other changes include new wheel choices and a restyled trunk lid. But somehow, the new Civic still looks like the old model. This is most likely due to model sticking with the same profile as the previous model. It is an improvement, but I wished Honda’s designers could have done more.

    This leads us to the Corolla which has undergone a massive transformation from bland econobox to something stylish. The new model borrows heavily from the Corolla Furia concept shown last year at the Detroit Auto Show. There’s a bold front end design, short rear end, LED lighting and sharp lines throughout. The S model adds a bit more aggression with a mesh grille, seventeen-inch alloy wheels, and a distinguishing blue color that makes the Corolla really stand out in a crowd.

    Design-wise, the Corolla takes the win in this round.

    Interior:

    Both models have seen a massive improvement with their interiors thanks to improved designs and better materials used throughout. Finding a comfortable position in either car was easy thanks to the range of adjustments available with the optional power seats and adjustable steering wheels that tilt and telescopes in both vehicles. Even the controls for either vehicle were in easy reach for the driver and passenger.

    2014 Honda Civic EX L 10

    So where do the Civic and Corolla differ? The interior rear space according to the auto sheets. Looking at the spec sheets of the two models, the Corolla has more passenger volume than Civic (97.11 cubic feet vs. 92.1 cubic feet). The Corolla also bests the Civic in most rear seat dimensions (except in rear hip room where the Civic holds a 7.5 inch advantage over the Corolla). But sitting in the back of both vehicles tells another story. The Corolla feels a little bit tighter as my head is almost touching the roof (mostly due to the optional sunroof) and my legs being right up against the front seat. The Civic has a little bit more space for my head and legs. Also helping the Civic is the beige color for the interior which helps make it feel larger. The Corolla was done up in a black interior which only made the interior feel smaller.

    The Civic just takes this round for having a slightly larger back seat and feeling slightly larger.

    Technology:

    Both Honda and Toyota were a bit behind on the technology front when compared to competitors, but both Civic and Corolla feature their latest generation of infotainment systems.

    Honda’s latest infotainment system features some new improvements such as new home screen with large touchscreen buttons to take you to different parts of the system and the introduction of Aha internet radio which allows you to create personalized stations from content on the internet (podcasts, radio, music, etc.). But there still is a lot of the old Honda system here. Case in point is the navigation system which was fine back in 2005, but looks dated when compared to other systems. Also not helping the Civic out is Honda’s decision to go with capacitive touch buttons on the Civics head unit. I found myself having to hit the buttons for the volume or home buttons a few times for it to register. Thankfully, this Civic came equipped with steering wheel controls which I found myself using a lot.

    2014 Toyota Corolla S 11

    Toyota has taken a huge leap forward with their infotainment system with a new interface that is easy to use and understand thanks to a larger font, improved graphics, and bigger touchscreen buttons. Also helping is Toyota’s decision to keep actual buttons to help get you around to different parts of the system. The Corolla’s screen is slightly smaller than the Civics, but I found the Corolla’s screen to be just as bright and readable as the one found in the Civic. An added bonus for the Corolla’s infotainment system is variety of information that comes from XM Radio which includes weather, stock quotes, sport scores, and much more. I don’t how many people are checking your stock quotes via the car’s infotainment system, but everything else is a nice touch.

    The Corolla with its better interface and feature set takes this round.

    Powertrain:

    Both of these compacts utilize 1.8L four-cylinder engines paired to CVTs. The Civic makes do with 143 horsepower and 129 pound-feet of torque, while the Corolla has 140 horsepower and 126 pound-feet of torque. With both vehicles having around the same power, there really isn’t a difference in how quickly they get up to speed. Leaving a stop light or merging onto the freeway, both models got up to speed at a reasonable clip.

    The difference lies in the refinement of the powertrains. The Civic has a slight advantage over the Corolla in this department as its four-cylinder is just a little bit quieter when at idle or moving. The CVT in the Civic also doesn’t make as much noise when you accelerate as it does in the Corolla.

    2014 Honda Civic EX L 7

    The flip side is when we are talking about fuel economy. The EPA rates the 2014 Honda Civic at 30 City/39 Highway/33 Combined, and the 2014 Toyota Corolla at 29 City/38 Highway/32 Combined. In my testing, the Corolla bested the Civic in average fuel economy with the former getting 32.2 MPG and the latter getting 31.3 MPG.

    In this round, I think I call this a tie.

    Ride & Drive:

    For most drivers, these vehicles will be driven in the city and out on the freeway. How do they fare in this area? Well the Civic is the more comfortable of the two as its able to smooth out the roadway and provide a ride that is reminiscent to bigger sedan. Road and wind noise were kept to a decent level, I.e. I didn’t have to turn up the radio a lot to drown out the noise. The Corolla’s ride is a little bit stiffer due to the S model getting slightly larger wheels and some suspension tuning. This means more bumps and road imperfections are let in. Noise isolation is about the same as the Civic.

    2014 Toyota Corolla S 5

    But what if you decide to have a bit of fun? Then you want the Corolla. I know this is a bit of surprise, but the Corolla S is really good in the corners with new suspension tuning and nicely weighted steering that provides decent feel. The Civic loses a bit here due to its suspension being somewhat softer, although the steering is just as good as the Corolla.

    In this round, I’ll give half a point to each car. The Civic for better daily ride, while the Corolla nails the fun to drive aspect.

    Verdict:

    With a score of 2.5 vs. 1.5, the Corolla is the winner in this comparison. The Corolla has the better looks, infotainment system, and is fun to play around with. The Civic, while coming in second has some redeeming features in its camp. The interior is slightly larger than the Corolla and it offers a more comfortable ride when driving day to day.

    After spending a week with both vehicles, I can now see why these two are the top selling models in the class. Its not just name itself, but how these two cars are all things to all people.

    Disclaimer: Honda Provided the Civic EX-L, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas. Toyota Provided the Corolla S, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas.

    Year: 2014

    Make: Honda

    Model: Civic

    Trim: EX-L w/Navi

    Engine: 1.8L 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC Inline-Four

    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, CVT

    Horsepower @ RPM: 143 @ 6500

    Torque @ RPM: 129 @ 4300

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 28/39/32

    Curb Weight: 2,930 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Greensburg, Indiana

    Base Price: $24,240

    As Tested Price: $25,030 (Includes $790.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    N/A

    Year: 2014

    Make: Toyota

    Model: Corolla

    Trim: S

    Engine: 1.8L DOHC 16-Valve VVT-i Inline-Four

    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, CVT

    Horsepower @ RPM: 132 @ 6,000

    Torque @ RPM: 128 @ 4,400

    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 29/37/32

    Curb Weight: 2,895 lbs

    Location of Manufacture: Blue Springs, Mississippi

    Base Price: $20,400

    As Tested Price: $23,570 (Includes $810.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:

    Driver Connivence Package - $1,510

    Power Moonroof - $850.00

    William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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    Great write up and comparison. I was surprised to see the Honda has a disconnect in the dash. It looks like they forced the passenger side to mesh up with the infotainment system and drivers world. Corolla clearly has a better dash design.

     

    Both are too small for me but interesting to see this comparison.

     

    Thanks Bill

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    There are better choices out there, but I can see why these cars are popular.  The Civic is a lot of car for the money.  I find it to be a little too cramped though, and the styling inside and out is dated.  The Corolla is spacious and more livable in the back than the tight  Cruze or Malibu.

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    I've been seeing, it seems, so many new Corollas in S trim.  Easily the best looking model of the car, to me it shows that Toyota fans are desperate for something with a modicum of coolness to drive.  The new Corolla interior is nice, I really like the dash, Toyota's current, slightly retro horizontal theme to their dashes is a nice change from the "center stack" craze that appears on just about every other manufacturer's vehicles.  Still vanilla cake underneath, (all day) but with a bit of spicy icing.

     

    The Honda is a bit stale at this point.  Tacking on some deluxe trim to the old design hasn't really changed much, imo.

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    I'm still trying to figure out how the geniuses at Toyota equip the sportier S model with less power than the base and LE/Eco versions of this car. 132 HP vs 140. You used to be able to get the larger Camry 2.4 in the Corolla but now it's stuck with the none to quick 1.8. So don't pick the S version with quicker performance in mind. Only there handling is better.

     

    For 2015 the 140 HP version of the 1.8 is now only for the Eco model and all other versions of the Corolla are downgraded to the 132 HP 1.8 meaning this car is one of the lowest in it's segment for power.

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    Drew I am pretty sure you'd like the Cruze diesel. Solid cushy and quiet. It cruzes effortlessly. The diesel really feels like a different car. 50-60+ mpg readings on the dash too. It does feels quite a bit heavier than an Eco, which it is, but the suspension is beefier to account for that.

     

    edit, the billboard i drive by on the way to work today said gas was 2.89 and diesel is 4.11.  However we all know gas will go up soon.

    Edited by regfootball
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    I'm still trying to figure out how the geniuses at Toyota equip the sportier S model with less power than the base and LE/Eco versions of this car. 132 HP vs 140. You used to be able to get the larger Camry 2.4 in the Corolla but now it's stuck with the none to quick 1.8. So don't pick the S version with quicker performance in mind. Only there handling is better.

     

    For 2015 the 140 HP version of the 1.8 is now only for the Eco model and all other versions of the Corolla are downgraded to the 132 HP 1.8 meaning this car is one of the lowest in it's segment for power.

    Slight correction : No change nor downgrading in engine between 2014-2015. L-LE-S use the same 132hp they had. The 140hp (exact same engine but with Vavematic - more mpg but less torque) was and still is an LEeco exclusive.

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      There is no denying the Opel/Vauxhall roots of the Buick Cascada as it is just basically the Cascada sold in Europe with Buick basing. But that isn’t a bad thing since the Cascada is handsome for the most part. The front features a new grille design and headlights with LED accents. The side profile reveals short overhangs for the front and rear. These overhangs make the side look somewhat oddly proportioned. A set 20-inch wheels come standard. Around back, a long chrome bar runs along the trunk lid into the taillights. 
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      Interior:
      Unfortunately, both the Cascada and Camaro fall on their face when it comes to the interior for different reasons.
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      On the upside, the Cascada’s interior is well-built and features decent quality materials. A fair amount of dash and door panels feature some soft touch material. The front seats are comfortable for short and long distance trips. Power adjustments for the driver’s seat make it easy to find a position that works. One touch Buick deserves applause for is the seat belt presenter. The front seat belts are nestled away when the Cascada is turned off to make it easier to get in and out of the back seat. But when you start it up, the presenter extends for both the driver and passenger to buckle in. The back seat provides enough space for kids or small adults. Taller folks like myself will find minimal legroom. With the top up, anyone sitting back here will feel very confined. With the top down, this feeling goes away. 
      Step into the 2016 Camaro Convertible’s interior and you’ll find the same retro ideas from the previous model such as the shape of the dash and circular vents. But Chevrolet improved the overall usability of the Camaro’s interior. For example, the retro-inspired engine information gauges that were placed ahead of the shifter in the previous generation are gone. In its place are a set of air vents that also control the temperature of the climate control system. 
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      Powertrain:
      Power for the Buick Cascada comes from a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic. The figures are impressive for this engine. But drop it into the Cascada and it is quite disappointing. Performance is very lethargic as the engine has to overcome the nearly two tons of Cascada. It feels like an eternity getting up to speed and you’ll find yourself putting the pedal to the floor to get the vehicle moving at a sufficient rate. EPA figures for the Cascada stand at 20 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. My average for the week landed at 21 mpg. 
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      Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the Cascada and Camaro; Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
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      Make: Buick
      Model: Cascada
      Trim: Premium
      Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L SIDI DOHC with VVT
      Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 200 @ 5,500
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      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/27/23
      Curb Weight: 3,979 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Gliwice, Poland
      Base Price: $36,065
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      Make: Chevrolet
      Model: Camaro Convertible
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      Engine: 6.2L VVT DI V8
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      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/28/20
      Curb Weight: 3,966 lbs
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    • By William Maley
      Summertime means something different for everyone. For some, it’s time to enjoy the sunshine and warm weather. For others, it is the time to take that trip you have been thinking about for awhile. If you’re an automotive writer like myself, summertime means convertible season. The feeling of having the roof down and enjoying the expanded view of the sky is something quite special. This summer saw two of GM’s latest convertibles roll into the Cheers & Gears’ Detroit garage, the new Buick Cascada and recently redesigned Chevrolet Camaro SS convertible. How did these two droptops fare in the summer heat?
      Exterior:
      There is no denying the Opel/Vauxhall roots of the Buick Cascada as it is just basically the Cascada sold in Europe with Buick basing. But that isn’t a bad thing since the Cascada is handsome for the most part. The front features a new grille design and headlights with LED accents. The side profile reveals short overhangs for the front and rear. These overhangs make the side look somewhat oddly proportioned. A set 20-inch wheels come standard. Around back, a long chrome bar runs along the trunk lid into the taillights. 
      On the opposite end is the Chevrolet Camaro. If you’re looking for something quiet and doesn’t bring attention, then maybe you should pass on it. Redesigned last year, Chevrolet retained the Camaro’s basic profile with its sharp lines and rounded corners. But major work was done on the front and rear ends. The front features a narrow top grille and slim headlights. A massive grille sits underneath between a set of deep cuts into the front bumper. The back has been cleaned up with a new trunk lid design, rectangular headlights, and quad-exhaust tips. 
      One item both the Cascada and Camaro share is a fabric top. Putting the top down or up takes under 20 seconds for both vehicles. With the tops down, both vehicles look quite good. But put the tops up and the Cascada is the better looking of the two. I can’t put my finger as to why, but I think it deals with how the Cascada has a little bit more glass than the Camaro. 
      Interior:
      Unfortunately, both the Cascada and Camaro fall on their face when it comes to the interior for different reasons.
      In the case of the Cascada, it features the dash from the outgoing Verano and Encore. This reveals that the Cascada is older despite what Buick may have you think. For example, the center stack is laden with buttons and it will take you a few moments to find the specific one you’re looking for. Not helping is the Cascada using GM’s last-generation infotainment system. While the system is easy to use, the interface is looking very dated. It would have been nice if Buick could have slipped in the dash from the updated Encore into the Cascade, but that would have likely introduced more problems than solutions.
      On the upside, the Cascada’s interior is well-built and features decent quality materials. A fair amount of dash and door panels feature some soft touch material. The front seats are comfortable for short and long distance trips. Power adjustments for the driver’s seat make it easy to find a position that works. One touch Buick deserves applause for is the seat belt presenter. The front seat belts are nestled away when the Cascada is turned off to make it easier to get in and out of the back seat. But when you start it up, the presenter extends for both the driver and passenger to buckle in. The back seat provides enough space for kids or small adults. Taller folks like myself will find minimal legroom. With the top up, anyone sitting back here will feel very confined. With the top down, this feeling goes away. 
      Step into the 2016 Camaro Convertible’s interior and you’ll find the same retro ideas from the previous model such as the shape of the dash and circular vents. But Chevrolet improved the overall usability of the Camaro’s interior. For example, the retro-inspired engine information gauges that were placed ahead of the shifter in the previous generation are gone. In its place are a set of air vents that also control the temperature of the climate control system. 
      Our tester featured the optional Chevrolet MyLink system with navigation. We know we’re beating a dead horse with our complaints with MyLink such as a slow response when going from various screens and recognizing devices plugged into the USB ports. But you would think that GM would maybe issue an update or something by now to fix some of these issues? Like other Chevrolet models we have driven this year, the Camaro’s MyLink system comes with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility. We tried CarPlay and found it to be easier to use than most automaker’s infotainment systems. But, we had issues with apps crashing and the system not always recognizing our phone.
      The front bucket seats are quite comfortable and will hold you in if you decide to tackle that special road aggressively. A set of power adjustments makes it easy for anyone to find a comfortable position. The back seat is best reserved for small kids or extra storage as legroom is nonexistent. You would think that the Camaro Convertible wouldn’t feel as claustrophobic as the coupe since you can put the top down, but it isn’t. Sitting in the Camaro convertible with the top down, I felt like I was being contained in a small box. Blame the high belt line for this.
      Powertrain:
      Power for the Buick Cascada comes from a turbocharged 1.6L four-cylinder with 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with a six-speed automatic. The figures are impressive for this engine. But drop it into the Cascada and it is quite disappointing. Performance is very lethargic as the engine has to overcome the nearly two tons of Cascada. It feels like an eternity getting up to speed and you’ll find yourself putting the pedal to the floor to get the vehicle moving at a sufficient rate. EPA figures for the Cascada stand at 20 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. My average for the week landed at 21 mpg. 
      The Camaro’s engine lineup includes a 3.6L V6, turbocharged 2.0L four, and our SS tester’s 6.2L V8. The V8 pumps out 455 horsepower and 455 pound-feet of torque. We had the optional eight-speed automatic, but you can get a six-speed manual. The V8 makes the Camaro Convertible stupidly fun. I found myself wanting to roll down the window at a stop light to tell the vehicle next to me “let me play you the song of my people” before stomping on the accelerator and having the V8 roar into life as the light turns green. The engine will pin you in your seat if you floor it and there is a never-ending stream of power throughout the rev range. A nice touch is the optional dual-mode exhaust system that only amplifies the noises of the V8. The eight-speed automatic is ofine around town and on the highway but stumbles somewhat in enthusiastic driving where it takes a moment to downshift when slowing down. Fuel economy for the Camaro SS Convertible stands at 17 City/28 Highway/20 Combined. I got about 19 mpg during my week-long test.
      Ride & Handling:
      Describing the ride and handling characteristics of the Cascada can be summed up in one word; smooth. Buick’s engineers tuned the Cascada’s suspension to deliver an almost magic carpet ride. Even with a set of twenty-inch wheels as standard equipment, the Cascada is able to deal with rough roads with no issues. Around corners, the Cascada feels planted and body roll is kept in check. But don’t plan on doing anything enthusiastic with it. The steering is a little bit too light for it. Drive it like a relaxed cruiser and you’ll enjoy it. Wind buffeting is minimal with either the windows rolled up or down.
      The Camaro Convertible is shocking as to how well it handles. Part of this comes down to optional Magnetic Ride Control (MRC) system which limits body roll. Chevrolet engineers also worked on improving the structural rigidity of the Camaro. The combination makes the convertible just as good as the coupe in corners. Direction change is fast and there is plenty of grip coming from the meaty tires. Where the Camaro Convertible falters is the ride quality. The SS comes with a set of twenty-inch wheels. While they do look sharp, it makes for a somewhat unbearable ride. Bumps of any size are clearly transmitted to those sitting inside. MRC does its best to provide a comfortable ride, but it might be worth considering going down to a smaller wheel to improve the ride. Wind buffeting is kept in check with the windows up or down.
      Price:
      The 2016 Buick Cascada starts at $33,065 for the base model. Our up-level Premium starts at $36,065 and comes to an as-tested price of $37,385 thanks to the vehicle being finished in an optional blue color. You really don’t get much in terms of additional features when compared to the base Cascada aside from some additional safety features - front and rear parking sensors, lane departure warning, and forward collision alert - and automatic wipers. Also for that amount of cash, you could with the Audi A3 cabriolet which offers a slightly more premium interior. But you would lose out on the larger back seat of the Cascada. You would be better off with the base Cascada.
      If you have your heart set on a Camaro Convertible, be ready to shell out the cash. The 2016 Camaro 2SS Convertible carries a base sticker of $48,300 - $6,005 more expensive than the coupe. Add on the list of options fitted to our tester such as the eight-speed automatic, magnetic ride control, and dual-mode exhaust system and you’ll end up with an as-tested price of $54,075. I’ll give you a moment to pick yourself up from the floor due to the price shock. The Camaro is nice car all-around, but is it really worth dropping $54,000?! We’re not so sure. 
      Verdict:
      Both of vehicles have issues that don’t make them as appealing. The Cascada’s engine either needs to be kicked to the curb or head off to the gym to get a bit more power. It would nice if Buick could also figure how to put in the dash from the updated Encore into the Cascada, although that might prove to be an engineering nightmare and something that would be better suited for the next-generation model. The Camaro Convertible’s price tag will make a number of people and their bank accounts cry. Also for being a convertible, the Camaro still feels as claustrophobic as the coupe.
      But when you drop the tops in both models, you forget all about the issues. Instead, you begin to take in the sky and rush of the wind. This makes you remember why you bought a convertible, to enjoy the feeling of openness. It is only when you put the top back up that makes you wonder if you can live with the issues. In the case of the Cascada, the answer is no. The Camaro is a maybe.
       
       
      Disclaimer: General Motors Provided the Cascada and Camaro; Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Buick
      Model: Cascada
      Trim: Premium
      Engine: Turbocharged 1.6L SIDI DOHC with VVT
      Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Six-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 200 @ 5,500
      Torque @ RPM: 207 @ 1,800 - 4,500, 221 @ 2,200 - 4,000 (with overboost)
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 20/27/23
      Curb Weight: 3,979 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Gliwice, Poland
      Base Price: $36,065
      As Tested Price: $37,385 (Includes $925.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Deep Sky Metallic - $395.00
      Year: 2016
      Make: Chevrolet
      Model: Camaro Convertible
      Trim: SS
      Engine: 6.2L VVT DI V8
      Driveline: Rear-Wheel Drive, Eight-Speed Automatic
      Horsepower @ RPM: 455 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 455 @ 4,400
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/28/20
      Curb Weight: 3,966 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Lansing, MI
      Base Price: $48,300
      As Tested Price: $54,075 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Magnetic Ride Control - $1,695.00
      Eight-Speed Automatic - $1,495.00
      Dual-Mode Exhaust - $895.00
      Chevrolet MyLink with Navigation - $495.00
      20" 5-Split Spoke Aluminum Wheels - $200.00
    • By William Maley
      Three years might not seem like a long time. But in the automotive industry, it is an eternity. In that short amount time, a vehicle may be surpassed by competitors and sales may take a dive. Take for example the Nissan Altima. When the redesigned model was launched back in 2013, it was considered to be above-average and some key advantages over rivals. But time has passed and the Altima has been surpassed in a number of key areas by refreshed/redesigned competitors. Nissan knew they needed to do something to get the Altima back in contention. Last year, they introduced a refreshed Altima that would hopefully give them a fighting chance in the class. Let's see if it does.
      If you were expecting some big changes to the Altima’s exterior in this mid-cycle refresh, then you’ll be disappointed. The front end features a new V-shaped grille and revised headlights to bring the model in line with the current Nissan design language. Updated taillights and new wheel choices finish off the changes. The interior is mostly left alone in this refresh aside from some new choices of trim pieces. That isn’t a bad thing as the Altima’s interior is a nice place to be in with ample space for passengers, a fair amount of soft-touch materials used throughout, and a simple dash layout. 
      One item we do wish Nissan would have addressed in this refresh is the NissanConnect infotainment system. All Altimas come with a five-inch touchscreen as standard, while our SL tester featured the optional seven-inch screen. This system has a number of issues ranging from an interface that makes it look older than it really is to the system crashing our iPod on a regular basis. More worrying was the system crashing and rebooting twice during our week-long test. It would be nice for Nissan to take the system out of the Maxima and Murano and put it into the rest of their lineup as it doesn’t have the issues listed here.
      Under the hood of the Altima are the same engines that have powered it since 2013. Our Altima SL tester came with the standard 2.5L four-cylinder with 183 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque. Optional is a 3.5L V6 with 270 horsepower and 251 pound-feet of torque. No matter which engine you pick, a Xtronic CVT routes the power to the front wheels. The 2.5 does quite well around town as the engine gets up to speed at a decent rate. Getting onto the highway is another story as you’ll need to almost floor the gas pedal to get up to speed at a somewhat decent rate. This also brings forth an abundance of engine noise, something we complained about in our 2014 Nissan Altima SL review. At least the Xtronic CVT is responsive when you step on the accelerator and the illusion of the stepped gears can make most buyers believe they’re driving an automatic.
      The EPA rates the Altima’s fuel economy at 27 City/39 Highway/31 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 31.7 MPG.
      The Altima’s ride and handling characteristics are in the middle. The suspension does a decent job of soaking up most bumps, but some larger ones will make their way inside. The recently redesigned Chevrolet Malibu and Volkswagen Passat do a better job in this regard. In the bends, the Altima feels composed and shows little body roll. But the steering is way too light and doesn’t offer enough feel to feel sporty. If you want that, a Mazda6 or Ford Fusion should be on the list.
      How do you sum up the 2016 Nissan Altima? It is a competent midsize sedan. But competent isn’t a strong selling point to a midsize sedan as you can apply to any model in the class. What you need is something that makes your model stand out whether in terms of design or features. The Altima doesn’t have anything like that.
      Picking the Altima may be the safe choice, but it be might a choice you regret.
      Disclaimer: Nissan Provided the Altima, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Nissan
      Model: Altima
      Trim: 2.5 SL
      Engine: 2.5L DOHC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Xtronic CVT
      Horsepower @ RPM: 182 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 180 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 27/39/31
      Curb Weight: 3,254 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Smyrna, TN
      Base Price: $28,570
      As Tested Price: $32,115 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Technology Package - $1,700
      Moonroof Package - $800.00
      Carpeted Floormats and Trunk Mat - $210.00

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Three years might not seem like a long time. But in the automotive industry, it is an eternity. In that short amount time, a vehicle may be surpassed by competitors and sales may take a dive. Take for example the Nissan Altima. When the redesigned model was launched back in 2013, it was considered to be above-average and some key advantages over rivals. But time has passed and the Altima has been surpassed in a number of key areas by refreshed/redesigned competitors. Nissan knew they needed to do something to get the Altima back in contention. Last year, they introduced a refreshed Altima that would hopefully give them a fighting chance in the class. Let's see if it does.
      If you were expecting some big changes to the Altima’s exterior in this mid-cycle refresh, then you’ll be disappointed. The front end features a new V-shaped grille and revised headlights to bring the model in line with the current Nissan design language. Updated taillights and new wheel choices finish off the changes. The interior is mostly left alone in this refresh aside from some new choices of trim pieces. That isn’t a bad thing as the Altima’s interior is a nice place to be in with ample space for passengers, a fair amount of soft-touch materials used throughout, and a simple dash layout. 
      One item we do wish Nissan would have addressed in this refresh is the NissanConnect infotainment system. All Altimas come with a five-inch touchscreen as standard, while our SL tester featured the optional seven-inch screen. This system has a number of issues ranging from an interface that makes it look older than it really is to the system crashing our iPod on a regular basis. More worrying was the system crashing and rebooting twice during our week-long test. It would be nice for Nissan to take the system out of the Maxima and Murano and put it into the rest of their lineup as it doesn’t have the issues listed here.
      Under the hood of the Altima are the same engines that have powered it since 2013. Our Altima SL tester came with the standard 2.5L four-cylinder with 183 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque. Optional is a 3.5L V6 with 270 horsepower and 251 pound-feet of torque. No matter which engine you pick, a Xtronic CVT routes the power to the front wheels. The 2.5 does quite well around town as the engine gets up to speed at a decent rate. Getting onto the highway is another story as you’ll need to almost floor the gas pedal to get up to speed at a somewhat decent rate. This also brings forth an abundance of engine noise, something we complained about in our 2014 Nissan Altima SL review. At least the Xtronic CVT is responsive when you step on the accelerator and the illusion of the stepped gears can make most buyers believe they’re driving an automatic.
      The EPA rates the Altima’s fuel economy at 27 City/39 Highway/31 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 31.7 MPG.
      The Altima’s ride and handling characteristics are in the middle. The suspension does a decent job of soaking up most bumps, but some larger ones will make their way inside. The recently redesigned Chevrolet Malibu and Volkswagen Passat do a better job in this regard. In the bends, the Altima feels composed and shows little body roll. But the steering is way too light and doesn’t offer enough feel to feel sporty. If you want that, a Mazda6 or Ford Fusion should be on the list.
      How do you sum up the 2016 Nissan Altima? It is a competent midsize sedan. But competent isn’t a strong selling point to a midsize sedan as you can apply to any model in the class. What you need is something that makes your model stand out whether in terms of design or features. The Altima doesn’t have anything like that.
      Picking the Altima may be the safe choice, but it be might a choice you regret.
      Disclaimer: Nissan Provided the Altima, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2016
      Make: Nissan
      Model: Altima
      Trim: 2.5 SL
      Engine: 2.5L DOHC Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Xtronic CVT
      Horsepower @ RPM: 182 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 180 @ 4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 27/39/31
      Curb Weight: 3,254 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Smyrna, TN
      Base Price: $28,570
      As Tested Price: $32,115 (Includes $835.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Technology Package - $1,700
      Moonroof Package - $800.00
      Carpeted Floormats and Trunk Mat - $210.00
    • By William Maley
      Trucks and Compacts Star as American Honda Reports August Sales
      Sep 1, 2016 - TORRANCE, Calif.
      American Honda and Honda Division trucks have best August sales ever Honda CR-V sets 2nd consecutive all-time sales record Honda core models—Civic, Accord and CR-V—each top more than 30,000 sales Honda's smallest vehicles—Fit and HR-V—post largest gains for the brand Refreshed Acura MDX posts 8.1 percent gain to push Acura trucks up 2.5 percent in August American Honda Motor Co., Inc. today reported strong August sales of 149,571 Honda and Acura vehicles, a 3.8 percent decrease over August 2015 due in part to the lack of the Labor Day sales weekend. American Honda trucks set a new August record, rising 4.3 percent on sales of 76,140. Honda Division sales totaled 135,325 units, with Honda trucks also setting an August record, gaining 4.5 percent on sales of 66,802. Acura Division sales were down 7 percent on sales of 14,246 units, also feeling the effects of the lost weekend. However, Acura trucks were up 2.5 percent on sales of 9,338 as new models continued to fill the pipeline.
      Honda
      Honda Division's August sales almost matched the same period last year without one of the biggest holiday sales weekends of the year. Despite the handicap, CR-V continued its record-setting ways for the second straight month while all three of the brand's best-selling models (Accord, Civic and CR-V) topped 30,000 units apiece and Honda's compact HR-V and Fit posted major gains. Honda trucks posted a new August record supported by brisk sales of CR-V, HR-V and Ridgeline, while Civic and Fit drove car sales for the brand.      
      Honda trucks set a new August record, rising 4.5 percent with sales of 66,802 units CR-V climbed 5 percent on sales of 36,517 for a 2nd consecutive all-time record HR-V sales jumped 66 percent on sales of 7,580 vehicles Civic and Fit were up 2.4 percent (32,807 sales) and 85.1 percent (5,370 sales) "Our continued success with strong sales of both passenger cars and light trucks demonstrates once again that the key to great sales is great product," said Jeff Conrad, senior vice president and general manager of the Honda Division. "As we continue with our rapid cadence of new models, our focus will remain on selling vehicles one at a time to individual customers."
      Acura
      With inventories building for the new 2017 MDX, sales continue to rise as more customers experience the bold new exterior styling and expanded complement of premium features and technologies. Adding a solid result from RDX, Acura truck sales were up 2.5 percent in August, with sedan sales held back in part due to the lost holiday weekend compared to August 2015.
      MDX sales increased 8.1 percent in August on sales of 5,131 units Acura trucks were up 2.5 percent overall for the month, with 9,338 vehicles sold The new NSX posted 22 sales in August as production continues to ramp up in Acura's new NSX global production facility "It's great to see Acura's Precision Crafted Performance DNA resonate with customers, as the new MDX gives luxury buyers their first taste of our new performance design direction," said Jon Ikeda, vice president and general manager of the Acura division. "Together with the launch of the amazing new NSX, a resurgent Acura Motorsports program and growing intentions from younger buyers, we continue to build strong momentum for the Acura brand."
      American Honda Vehicle Sales for August 2016
            Month-to-Date
      Year-to-Date
            August 2016
      August 2015
      DSR** % Change
      MoM % Change
      August 2016
      August 2015
      DSR** % Change
      YoY % Change
          American Honda Total
      149,571
      155,491
      -3.8%
      -3.8%
      1,094,725
      1,054,816
      3.8%
      3.8%
          Total Car Sales
      73,431
      82,483
      -11.0%
      -11.0%
      564,425
      542,210
      4.1%
      4.1%
          Total Truck Sales
      76,140
      73,008
      4.3%
      4.3%
      530,300
      512,606
      3.5%
      3.5%
          Honda Total Car Sales
      68,523
      76,281
      -10.2%
      -10.2%
      526,962
      498,695
      5.7%
      5.7%
          Honda Total Truck Sales
      66,802
      63,897
      4.5%
      4.5%
      460,849
      438,806
      5.0%
      5.0%
          Acura Total Car Sales
      4,908
      6,202
      -20.9%
      -20.9%
      37,463
      43,515
      -13.9%
      -13.9%
          Acura Total Truck Sales
      9,338
      9,111
      2.5%
      2.5%
      69,451
      73,800
      -5.9%
      -5.9%
          Total Domestic Car Sales
      67,054
      81,873
      -18.1%
      -18.1%
      524,739
      537,277
      -2.3%
      -2.3%
            Honda Division
      62,265
      75,859
      -17.9%
      -17.9%
      488,231
      495,393
      -1.4%
      -1.4%
            Acura Division
      4,789
      6,014
      -20.4%
      -20.4%
      36,508
      41,884
      -12.8%
      -12.8%
          Total Domestic Truck Sales
      76,140
      73,008
      4.3%
      4.3%
      530,300
      512,601
      3.5%
      3.5%
            Honda Division
      66,802
      63,897
      4.5%
      4.5%
      460,849
      438,801
      5.0%
      5.0%
            Acura Division
      9,338
      9,111
      2.5%
      2.5%
      69,451
      73,800
      -5.9%
      -5.9%
          Total Import Car Sales
      6,377
      610
      945.4%
      945.4%
      39,686
      4,933
      704.5%
      704.5%
            Honda Division
      6,258
      422
      1,382.9%
      1,382.9%
      38,731
      3,302
      1,073.0%
      1,073.0%
            Acura Division
      119
      188
      -36.7%
      -36.7%
      955
      1,631
      -41.4%
      -41.4%
          Total Import Truck Sales
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      0
      5
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
            Honda Division
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      0
      5
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
            Acura Division
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
           MODEL BREAKOUT BY DIVISION
      Honda Division Total
      135,325
      140,178
      -3.5%
      -3.5%
      987,811
      937,501
      5.4%
      5.4%
            * ACCORD
      30,115
      40,931
      -26.4%
      -26.4%
      231,415
      231,173
      0.1%
      0.1%
            * CIVIC
      32,807
      32,031
      2.4%
      2.4%
      255,599
      221,471
      15.4%
      15.4%
              CR-Z
      222
      333
      -33.3%
      -33.3%
      1,699
      1,895
      -10.3%
      -10.3%
            * FIT
      5,370
      2,901
      85.1%
      85.1%
      38,187
      42,867
      -10.9%
      -10.9%
              INSIGHT
      9
      85
      -89.4%
      -89.4%
      62
      1,289
      -95.2%
      -95.2%
                                      CROSSTOUR
      7
      930
      -99.2%
      -99.2%
      720
      6,450
      -88.8%
      -88.8%
            * CR-V
      36,517
      34,771
      5.0%
      5.0%
      231,609
      229,574
      0.9%
      0.9%
              HR-V
      7,580
      4,567
      66.0%
      66.0%
      51,417
      24,617
      108.9%
      108.9%
              ODYSSEY
      9,992
      13,423
      -25.6%
      -25.6%
      85,881
      88,910
      -3.4%
      -3.4%
              PILOT
      9,269
      10,202
      -9.1%
      -9.1%
      81,793
      88,742
      -7.8%
      -7.8%
              RIDGELINE
      3,437
      4
      85,825.0%
      85,825.0%
      9,429
      513
      1,738.0%
      1,738.0%
                                    ***
      Memo: Accord FHEV
      890
      1,369
      -35.0%
      -35.0%
      1,720
      9,257
      -81.4%
      -81.4%
              Memo: Accord PHEV
      0
      2
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
      0
      62
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
              Memo: Civic Hybrid
      50
      590
      -91.5%
      -91.5%
      817
      3,317
      -75.4%
      -75.4%
                                    Acura Division Total
      14,246
      15,313
      -7.0%
      -7.0%
      106,914
      117,315
      -8.9%
      -8.9%
              ILX
      1,172
      1,660
      -29.4%
      -29.4%
      10,831
      11,744
      -7.8%
      -7.8%
              NSX
      22
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      45
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
              RLX / RL
      118
      187
      -36.9%
      -36.9%
      951
      1,600
      -40.6%
      -40.6%
              TL
      0
      1
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
      0
      85
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
              TLX
      3,595
      4,353
      -17.4%
      -17.4%
      25,632
      30,055
      -14.7%
      -14.7%
              TSX
      1
      1
      0.0%
      0.0%
      4
      31
      -87.1%
      -87.1%
                                      MDX
      5,131
      4,747
      8.1%
      8.1%
      34,648
      39,144
      -11.5%
      -11.5%
              RDX
      4,207
      4,364
      -3.6%
      -3.6%
      34,803
      34,654
      0.4%
      0.4%
              ZDX
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      0
      2
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
                                    ***
      Memo: ILX Hybrid
      0
      1
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
      1
      20
      -95.0%
      -95.0%
              Memo: RLX Hybrid
      19
      34
      -44.1%
      -44.1%
      134
      181
      -26.0%
      -26.0%
              Memo: TSX Wagon
      0
      0
      0.0%
      0.0%
      0
      2
      -100.0%
      -100.0%
                                    Selling Days
      26
      26
          204
      204
                **** Hybrid
      1,212
      2,414
      -49.8%
      -49.8%
      4,478
      16,021
      -72.0%
      -72.0%
               
        *    Honda and Acura vehicles are made of domestic & global sourced parts
          **   Daily Selling Rate
          ***  Memo line items are included in the respective model total
          **** Hybrid includes FHEV, PHEV, CR-Z, Civic Hybrid, Insight, ILX Hybrid, RLX Hybrid, RLX Sport Hybrid and NSX
       
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