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    Review: 2015 Ram ProMaster City Tradesman Cargo Van


    • The White Van From Italy*

       

      *By Way of Turkey.

    If you needed a cargo van in the past, you could only get one in either large and extra-large. There wasn’t really an option for something smaller, which left a number of business in a tough spot. They needed something that could carry deliveries or equipment, but be somewhat maneuverable and get decent gas mileage. Sure, some automakers offered a cargo version of their minivans. But they were not big sellers and some worried about the overall durability.

     

    In 2009, Ford introduced the Transit Connect to the U.S. marketplace. This small van was aimed at small businesses who needed something that delivered good gas mileage, but was still capable of holding a fair amount of cargo. The van became an instant hit not only with small business, but also large corporations who saw the Transit Connect as a way to lower their fuel bills for their fleet.

     

    Now other automakers are throwing their hat into the small cargo van ring to serve this audience. The most recent is Ram with the introduction of the ProMaster City. Based on the Fiat Doblo sold in Europe, Ram hopes the ProMaster City can give the Ford Transit Connect and Nissan NV200 a run for its money. We spent a week in a ProMaster City Tradesman Cargo to find out.

     

    The basic shape of Fiat Doblo is unchanged. Ram has made some changes such as front bumper with a crosshair grille, and lights that are DOT compliant. The ProMaster isn’t going to be taking home any awards for design, most business/commercial buyers won't care. They're just looking for a flat surface to paint a logo.

     

    2015 Ram ProMaster City Tradesman Cargo 4

    What they do care about is cargo space and that’s where the ProMaster City shines. Ram quotes total cargo space at 131.7 cubic feet which is larger than any other cargo van in the class, even the long-wheelbase Transit Connect. Other specs that make the ProMaster City perfect for cargo carrying duties include a low floor height (21.5 inches), wide cargo floor (60.4 inches and 48.4 inches at the wheel well), and payload capacity (1,886 lbs). The ProMaster also is very versatile thanks to split opening doors in the back, and sliding doors on either side. It was just the right vehicle for the week as the ProMaster was put on IKEA duty and easily swallowed the flat-pack furniture that we bought.

     


    Move up front and you’ll find a sparsely furnished interior with seating for two. Much of interior is carried over from Doblo. The only changes Ram made are a new steering wheel with audio controls and an AM/FM radio. Hard plastics line the dashboard and door panels, which should stand up to the hard work this van will be put through. Seats provided decent comfort and support. Our only complaint is with the adjustment knob for the seat. It's too far back to reach easily and the narrow space between the knob and door pillar makes adjusting the seat a pain.

     

    Our ProMaster City tester came equipped with the optional Uconnect 5.0 system with a backup camera. This system offers AM/FM/Bluetooth/USB/Aux and a trip computer. The system is very easy to use with large touchpoints, quick performance, and redundant buttons around the screen. The backup camera is a godsend as the rear windows in the ProMaster City Cargo are covered. The camera makes it easy to backup into tight spaces or when you are pulling out from a parking space.

     

    For power, Ram called in the 2.4L Tigershark MultiAir inline-four with 178 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque (available at 3,800 rpm). This is paired to a nine-speed automatic transmission. The inline-four does feel torquey and willing to get up to city speed limits in a flash. Anything above that and the ProMaster City feels slow. Ram quotes a 0-60 MPH time of under ten seconds and it feels like it. The nine-speed automatic has been improving with every Chrysler vehicle that we have driven. The transmission smoothly transitions from gear to gear is willing to downshift when needed. Still, we weren’t able to get the vehicle into the mythical ninth-gear in our testing. Even doing an 80-Mile round trip on the freeway, we found the transmission would only go into eighth gear.

     


    2015 Ram ProMaster City Tradesman Cargo 11


     

    The EPA rates the ProMaster City fuel economy at 21 City/29 Highway/24 Combined. Our average for the week landed around 22 MPG in mostly city driving.

     

    Ram made a number of changes to the suspension to get the ProMaster City ready for the U.S. Including raising the ride height and changing a number of components. It has paid off as the van provided a smooth ride even over some of the roughest roads. The ProMaster City also has one of the tightest turning circles of 32 feet, perfect for urban environments. However, the ProMaster isn’t what you would call fun to drive. There is an abundance of body roll when cornering, due to van’s height’s exceeding its width. Also, the steering a bit rubbery when you turn the wheel. This is pretty much expected for the class. Again, this isn’t a priority for most buyers.

     

    While Ram is late to small van party, it has very capable van in the form of the ProMaster City. It offers a number of best-in class figures, a comfortable ride, and decent performance. Paired with a lot of features for the price, the ProMaster City will give buyers what they want in a small van at a surprising price. Considering Ram has moved 8,113 ProMaster Cities through November, buyers seem to agree.

     

    Disclaimer: Ram Trucks Provided the ProMaster City, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

     

     

    Year: 2015
    Make: Ram Trucks
    Model: ProMaster City
    Trim: Tradesman Cargo
    Engine: 2.4L Tigershark MultiAir Inline-Four
    Driveline: Front-Wheel Drive, Nine-Speed Automatic
    Horsepower @ RPM: 178 @ 6,400
    Torque @ RPM: 178 @ 3,800
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/29/24
    Curb Weight: 3,512 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Bursa, Turkey
    Base Price: $24,130
    As Tested Price: $25,475 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)

     

    Options:
    Tradesman Cargo Van Package 24C - (-$1,000)
    Rear Back-Up Camera Group - $565.00
    UConnect 5.0 AM/FM/BT - $495.00
    Speed Control - $225.00
    Front Carpet Floor Mats by Mopar - $65.00

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    WOW, another butt ugly euro van. What is up with bringing in Euro designed and built butt ugly vans. I am impressed with the interior space for a small mini van but why could they not give it a better nose than one that looks pinched at the A pillar. I know it is just paint but it really is distracting.

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    WOW, another butt ugly euro van. What is up with bringing in Euro designed and built butt ugly vans. I am impressed with the interior space for a small mini van but why could they not give it a better nose than one that looks pinched at the A pillar. I know it is just pain but it really is distracting.

    You do realize styling is the last thing many buyers care about with a utility van, right?

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    I think that this Euro Van is the looker from all of them.

    It has cute little front fender bulges that stylize well and integrate perfectly with the headlight design. My only concern is that maybe its too cute for a very masculine plumber or electrician but perfect for a florist....

     

    If I had a small business that needed a small cargo van, I think Id go with it...

    2015-ram-promaster-city-cargo-van-475-p1

     

    And with matching body coloured bumpers, it looks even better.

    The Ford Transit Connect  is a close second for me.

     

    But...I too, am fed up with the Euro vans and their crappy styling.

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    WOW, another butt ugly euro van. What is up with bringing in Euro designed and built butt ugly vans. I am impressed with the interior space for a small mini van but why could they not give it a better nose than one that looks pinched at the A pillar. I know it is just pain but it really is distracting.

    You do realize styling is the last thing many buyers care about with a utility van, right?

     

    But, if all else is equal everybody would lean towards the better looking vehicle. Might as well at least attempt to not make it look like hell. 

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    Agreed.  Nissan/Chevy look like a square-toed shoe, in extra-narrow width.  The Ram is between those uglies and the Transit Connect, looks-wise.  And I agree, if the price and cost to own are similar, it is better for a business image to have a good looking van to represent them.

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    I see a lot of these as postal delivery vehicles. Reminds me of bread vans actually.

     

    A cost-effective hybrid system, even a mild hybrid system might be a boon for city use of these vans. But fuel prices gotta cooperate with anything like that.

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    i've configged a few passenger transit connects before.  I liken them to an Escape alternative.  And, they are pretty huge inside for their footprint on the outside.

     

    I think mfrs could diversify these boxes for passenger use a bit more.  Maybe this would be the next segment to get mass customized......

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