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regfootball

MADE IN CHINA, if that's what you want

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ny times

June 15, 2007

Thomas the Tank Engine Toys Recalled Because of Lead Paint

By ANGEL JENNINGS

The toy maker RC2 Corporation pulled a number of its Thomas & Friends trains and accessory parts off the shelves yesterday after learning that the red and yellow paint used to decorate more than 1.5 million of the toys contained lead.

Lead, if ingested by children, can cause long-term neurological problems that affect learning and behavior.

“Parents should not delay in getting these toys away from their kids,” Scott Wolfson, spokesman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, said yesterday.

An alert posted at a Web site devoted to the toy line, www.totallythomas.com, included a list of more than two dozen items affected by the recall. The company noted that toys that bear a code containing a “WJ” or “AZ” on the bottom of the toy or the inside of the battery door are not included in the recall.

The company at first urged consumers to mail in their Thomas toys, at their expense, in exchange for a replacement and a free train, an offer that angered some consumers.

Many Thomas the Tank Engine fans have collected dozens of trains, boxcars or railroad stations, and shipping several heavy pieces could quickly become expensive. Later yesterday, the company, which is based in Oak Brook, Ill., agreed to handle the shipping cost for all consumers who request it.

The affected Thomas toys were manufactured in China, which has come under fire recently for exporting a variety of goods, from pet food to toothpaste, that may pose safety or health hazards. “These are not cheap, plastic McDonald’s toys,” said Marian Goldstein of Maplewood, N.J., who spent more than $1,000 on her son’s Thomas collection, for toys that can cost $10 to $70 apiece. “But these are what is supposed to be a high-quality children’s toy.”

Ms. Goldstein’s 4-year-old son owns more than 40 pieces from the Thomas series, and seven of them were on the recall list, including the Sodor deluxe fire station, a footlong piece that is a little heavier than the average train.

Ms. Goldstein said she wondered who would pay for testing her son for lead poisoning if her insurance did not cover it.

Edited by regfootball
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you want cheap sh-t, you got it, America.

Edited by regfootball
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this recall may be a blessing in disguise.....this may actually get people to start to question the integrity of imported products and their manufacturing processes enough to the point they say, 'is cheap always worth it'?

I mean, lead, in kids toys. How fricking low does it get? It cannot get worse than that.

Edited by regfootball
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Since all we care about is cheap stuff....after a few cover ups, and a few months, and some extra goodwill-everyone will have forgot about it....

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This is indeed scary and yet sad... I remember the toothpaste thing recently. No one is complaining about the Buicks from China.

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I blame walmart.

No, I will blame people, who blindly buy "Cheaper" stuff, without looking at long term consequences. They bitch, everything is made in china, but does anybody, take effort to find made in USA and buy them? If people will be more prudent, Walmart will not exist.

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No, I will blame people, who blindly buy "Cheaper" stuff, without looking at long term consequences. They bitch, everything is made in china, but does anybody, take effort to find made in USA and buy them? If people will be more prudent, Walmart will not exist.

I blame walmart because walmart has force manufacturers to China in an effort to bring you "Everyday low prices! :) "

This ended up effecting products at ALL stores. If a toy manufacturer was force to begin producing in China because of Walmarts imposed price cuts, that same manufacturer is going to sell that same product to Target.

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No one is complaining about the Buicks from China.

Because the Buick's manufacturing process is overseen by an American corporation that values quality.

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The raw sewage in lard was pretty bad too.

They used to make jokes about KFC and putting weird stuff in the chicken, which was actually just an urban legend. But Chinese chicken, on the other hand...deep-fried in medical waste vats for that extra delicious chicken flavor!

Edited by mustang84
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I blame walmart because walmart has force manufacturers to China in an effort to bring you "Everyday low prices! :) "

This ended up effecting products at ALL stores. If a toy manufacturer was force to begin producing in China because of Walmarts imposed price cuts, that same manufacturer is going to sell that same product to Target.

You are right, but if these people were not ignorant about the quality of products, and if these eco-weenies who are part of the sheeplings of our society would haeve concentrated in telling people about Lead contamination rather than Detroit, things would not have been bad.

I mean Walmart would not have survived if the politicians would have levied anti dumping taxes on them, but wait China was awarded the Most Favored Nation Status, and Walmart is in the books of from Good to Great.

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I blame walmart because walmart has force manufacturers to China in an effort to bring you "Everyday low prices! :) "

This ended up effecting products at ALL stores. If a toy manufacturer was force to begin producing in China because of Walmarts imposed price cuts, that same manufacturer is going to sell that same product to Target.

Quoted for truth.

Sad, but very true...

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All products made in China should carry labels larger than the branding of the product itself, IMO. I am sick of buying stuff, having it break and then realizing it was made in China. For example, I am staring at a box of tissue paper that was on sale at my local grocery store. The brand I normally buy is .89. This stuff was .64. How bad can it be, right? Two-ply tissue paper is two ply, right? Wrong. This $h! just blows right through - literally. I checked the packaging: Made in China. It has gotten to the point that it is making me nuts when I buy stuff. I went to 5 or 6 places to buy a a/c unit last month and could not find one that was NOT made in China. That is f$#king sad!

MADE IN CHINA SHOULD BE A HAZARD WARNING, LIKE FLAMMABLE OR CORROSIVE CHEMICALS.

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I always look at where the product was made before I buy it so I can buy American or Canadian if possible but its getting harder to find things made here. I recently needed a new toaster and I looked in 4-5 different stores and all of them were made in china.

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Un-f***ing-Beleivable.

Sofia has more than a few Thomas Trains... Thanks for posting this. :mellow:

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I blame walmart because walmart has force manufacturers to China in an effort to bring you "Everyday low prices! :) "

This ended up effecting products at ALL stores. If a toy manufacturer was force to begin producing in China because of Walmarts imposed price cuts, that same manufacturer is going to sell that same product to Target.

And why do they want "Everyday low prices"? It because of the consumer. The consumer wants low prices, that's what they give them.

It's like the chicken and the egg. It goes full circle. You can't point your finger at one thing.

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"Made in USA".

I actively seek out that badge whenever I shop. Its like the bleeding holy grail for me. Food, musical equipment...I won't settle for anything less if I don't absolutely have to...hell, I even like my books to be printed in the US.

About a mile away from my house is a small farmer's market that sells only Michigan produce and its the only place my family goes to get vegetables that we don't grow ourselves.

Some people might call me elitist or whatever. I just like to think I have high standards.

As for Wal Mart...I don't even enter the store.

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This is getting ridiculous. What the hell is wrong with Chinese manufacturers? I passed this info on to some of my family members with small kids...disgusting.

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http://wcco.com/health/health_story_214152859.html

"China has always conducted international trade in the spirit of being responsible to its trade partners and itself," Commerce Minister Bo Xilai said in a statement published Thursday on the ministry's Web site. "Ninety-nine percent of China's exports are good and safe."

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Rrrrrrriiiigggggghhhhhhtttttt..... sssuuuurrrreeeee !!!

If true, how come 67% of everything Chinese-made I've ever owned or come in contact with has been about as "good" as.... something made in China.

Ban everything, wait 3 years for the message to sink in, then let everything Chinese-sourced reapply thru U.S.-designed testing procedures, then charge a flat license fee for the priviledge to do business in the U.S. market.

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I wish. Balthazar's solution sounds fair!

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Rrrrrrriiiigggggghhhhhhtttttt..... sssuuuurrrreeeee !!!

If true, how come 67% of everything Chinese-made I've ever owned or come in contact with has been about as "good" as.... something made in China.

Ban everything, wait 3 years for the message to sink in, then let everything Chinese-sourced reapply thru U.S.-designed testing procedures, then charge a flat license fee for the priviledge to do business in the U.S. market.

:thumbsup:

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