Oracle of Delphi

OK Romance language speakers, do you see anything wrong with this chart?

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Where are the other 100 Dalmatians?
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Where are the other 100 Dalmatians?

Silly boy, they are with Lady and the Tramp ... That would make a great porno title ... :globe:

Edited by Pontiac Custom-S
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There are a couple of Spanish languages missing...

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Very cool. 3 questions/comments:

(1) where is the actual "Italian" listed instead of "Italian dialects?"

(2) I do not like Catalan...just don't like it. The funny thing is that textbook Spanish, as taught to American kids, is what is spoken in South America, and not in Spain. While I was visiting Spain, someone once said to me "usted habla un Espanol correcto, que no es el Castellano." I took that as a compliment.

(3) Is proximity indicated by the chart? In other words, I know Italian is closer to Spanish, yet French shows up closer. You'll like this...you know that, because of its position and "colonizations," Sicilian has absorbed words from French (accatare instead of comprare, and on and on) but it is freakily similar to Portuguese in structure...that is, the articles and prepositions in Sicilian are just like those of Portuguese instead of those of the "Sienese/Florentine" mother tongue. I wonder how that happened?

Bottom line: I picked the wrong major in college. :lol:

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One more thing:

The "road map" on this chart would make Sardinian unintelligble to Italians. It sounds pretty weird. Heck, they are closer to Spain than they are to Italy. I couldn't believe how many Spanish surnames are found throughout Sardinia: Palmas, Torres, etc..

Sardinia and Sicily are the best places to go in Italy if you want beach, bar none.

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I'm just proud that Portuguese stems from 'vulgar' Latin: wouldn't want it any other way! How would one say 'f@#k off' in vulgar Latin? :smilewide:

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I'm just proud that Portuguese stems from 'vulgar' Latin: wouldn't want it any other way! How would one say 'f@#k off' in vulgar Latin? :smilewide:

Well, in Guido-land, it's "vaffanculo" (literally, it means something WORSE, but idiomatically, it means "eff off" or "go to hell") - how do you say "eff off" in Portuguese? (I may need to know that this summer). :lol:

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Very cool. 3 questions/comments:

(1) where is the actual "Italian" listed instead of "Italian dialects?"

(2) I do not like Catalan...just don't like it. The funny thing is that textbook Spanish, as taught to American kids, is what is spoken in South America, and not in Spain. While I was visiting Spain, someone once said to me "usted habla un Espanol correcto, que no es el Castellano." I took that as a compliment.

(3) Is proximity indicated by the chart? In other words, I know Italian is closer to Spanish, yet French shows up closer. You'll like this...you know that, because of its position and "colonizations," Sicilian has absorbed words from French (accatare instead of comprare, and on and on) but it is freakily similar to Portuguese in structure...that is, the articles and prepositions in Sicilian are just like those of Portuguese instead of those of the "Sienese/Florentine" mother tongue. I wonder how that happened?

Bottom line: I picked the wrong major in college. :lol:

Bingo, where is the Standard Italian language which was formed from the dialects, also where are the Proto-Spanish, Proto-Portuguese and Proto-French languages? These too are missing.

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Well, in Guido-land, it's "vaffanculo" (literally, it means something WORSE, but idiomatically, it means "eff off" or "go to hell") - how do you say "eff off" in Portuguese? (I may need to know that this summer). :lol:

I think I get the literal meaning of 'vaffanculo'...

In Portuguese you have an almost literal translation: 'vai-te foder'. Not a good thing to say very often, though.

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I'm just proud that Portuguese stems from 'vulgar' Latin: wouldn't want it any other way! How would one say 'f@#k off' in vulgar Latin? :smilewide:

Our languages are all just descendants of what the common Roman soldiers spoke everyday.

I'm not really sure English should be considered a true Germanic language with so many root words coming from Latin and the influx of Norman French after the Normans conquered the Anglo-Saxons ...

After all Britannia was part of the Roman Empire for 500 years ...

Edited by Pontiac Custom-S
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I think I get the literal meaning of 'vaffanculo'...

In Portuguese you have an almost literal translation: 'vai-te foder'. Not a good thing to say very often, though.

Similar to, Upper US ... The Northern US ... :neenerneener:

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Well, in Guido-land, it's "vaffanculo" (literally, it means something WORSE, but idiomatically, it means "eff off" or "go to hell") - how do you say "eff off" in Portuguese? (I may need to know that this summer). :lol:

I hate when my students hear from someone that it means FU and they show up to class all proud they know it. And I have to convince them, "First of all, you're wrong. Secondly, say it once and you'll be in detention for a week."

I think I get the literal meaning of 'vaffanculo'...

Go F yourself up the A. That's the closest meaning to it. But it has a really vicious tone behind it.

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Is it only me or has anyone else noticed that those Kardashian women from the TV are packing a sh*tload of sweater-meat?

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:huh:
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Our languages are all just descendants of what the common Roman soldiers spoke everyday.

I'm not really sure English should be considered a true Germanic language with so many root words coming from Latin and the influx of Norman French after the Normans conquered the Anglo-Saxons ...

After all Britannia was part of the Roman Empire for 500 years ...

English is a mutt.

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English is a mutt.

Camino', it's the International language of aviation. woof

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Camino', it's the International language of aviation. woof

Mutts do have their advantages. :AH-HA_wink:

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Mutts do have their advantages. :AH-HA_wink:

Here's a mutt agreeing with you.

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Our languages are all just descendants of what the common Roman soldiers spoke everyday.

I'm not really sure English should be considered a true Germanic language with so many root words coming from Latin and the influx of Norman French after the Normans conquered the Anglo-Saxons ...

After all Britannia was part of the Roman Empire for 500 years ...

It's about structure. English is Germanic in structure. English does not conjugate verbs like Romance languages, and nouns do not have masculine/feminine connotations. Much of our vocabulary is derived from other languages, particularly French when discussing governmental, legal, and some cultural concepts, but the structure of the language is solidly Germanic.

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