Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
William Maley

Rolls Royce News: Rumorpile: Customers To Rolls-Royce - No Diesels!

11 posts in this topic

William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

August 3, 2012

Back in March, Rolls-Royce CEO Torsten Müller-Ötvös said the automaker is looking into alternative powertrains. Already, electric power has been kicked out due to the range and charging time being unacceptable. Now, it looks like another power option has been kicked to the curb.

A source tells Autocar that Rolls-Royce asked their customers what they thought about diesels. The response was a resounding no.

“A diesel has a lot of low-end torque. But customers are not going to cop it. It’s the perception of compromise. They wouldn’t entertain the idea. They said absolutely not, don’t bring diesel anywhere near a Rolls-Royce, we won’t buy it,” said the source.

Source: Autocar

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

Click here to view the article

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It comes down to this, if you have the money to buy a brand new Rolls, gas mileage and the price of gas are not a concern.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the only other option that would be considered is Hybred, an electric engine driven unit with a gas generator that would be damn near silent. This would give you an ultimate quiet ride.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Hybrid could work, most of Rolls-Royce history was done with a V8, but at this point, I doubt any of their current or perspective customer base wants any less than a V12. Maybe bolt the BMW hybrid system on the the Rolls V12, but as stated, people buying a Phantom don't care about mpg or fuel cost. They just care that it took 127 hours to hand stitch the leather on the seats and that a man with white gloves spent a week polishing the chrome.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-1376-0-64548300-1344044820_thumb.jp

RUBRUBRUB

WE CAN'T USE THE SAME FUEL AS THE TRACTORS BELONGING TO THE PEASANTRY!

RUBRUBRUB

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the price level RR is at, it should be a completely unique powerplant, like a gas turbine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as Rolls can get around any NHV issues, I would think any Rolls buyer would love 700 ft-lb of thrust at 900 rpm.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the price level RR is at, it should be a completely unique powerplant, like a gas turbine.

Hmm... That is very good idea

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      Volkswagen isn't the only automaker that has the attention of German prosecutors. Yesterday, prosecutors carried out raids at various Daimler (parent company of Mercedes-Benz) buildings. This is part of an investigation into fraud related to false advertising and the possible manipulation of emissions with diesel powered vehicles.
      The Stuttgart public prosecutor's office told Reuters the raids were carried out "against known and unknown employees at Daimler, who are suspected of fraud and misleading advertising connected to manipulated emissions treatment of diesel passenger cars."
      23 prosecutors and around 230 staff, including police and state criminal authorities, searched 11 sites to look for evidence to help build a case.
      Diamler confirmed the raids to Reuters and said it was "cooperating with authorities."
      The company is also under investigation by the U.S. Justice Department for emission discrepancies with diesel vehicles.
      Source: Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Volkswagen isn't the only automaker that has the attention of German prosecutors. Yesterday, prosecutors carried out raids at various Daimler (parent company of Mercedes-Benz) buildings. This is part of an investigation into fraud related to false advertising and the possible manipulation of emissions with diesel powered vehicles.
      The Stuttgart public prosecutor's office told Reuters the raids were carried out "against known and unknown employees at Daimler, who are suspected of fraud and misleading advertising connected to manipulated emissions treatment of diesel passenger cars."
      23 prosecutors and around 230 staff, including police and state criminal authorities, searched 11 sites to look for evidence to help build a case.
      Diamler confirmed the raids to Reuters and said it was "cooperating with authorities."
      The company is also under investigation by the U.S. Justice Department for emission discrepancies with diesel vehicles.
      Source: Reuters
    • By William Maley
      Fiat Chrysler Automobiles finds itself in hot water once again. Today, the U.S. Justice Department has filed a lawsuit against the company in Federal Court for using a “defeat device” on 104,000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 models equipped with the 3.0L EcoDiesel V6 from the 2014 to 2016 model years. This follows news from last week that FCA applied for certification the 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 EcoDiesel as they feature new emission software.
      "The complaint alleges that FCA equipped nearly 104,000 Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles (Model Years 2014-2016) sold in the United States with at least eight software-based features that were not disclosed in FCA’s applications for certificates of conformity and that affect the vehicles’ emission control systems.  The undisclosed software features lessen the effectiveness of the vehicles’ emissions control systems during certain normal driving situations.  This results in cars that meet emission standards in the laboratory and during standard EPA testing, but during certain normal on-road driving emit oxides of nitrogen (NOx) that are much higher than the EPA-compliant level," the Justice Department wrote in a statement today.
      As we reported last Thursday, the U.S. Justice Department was preparing a suit against FCA if an agreement couldn't be reached with the EPA. The two parties have been in discussions since the EPA first alleged the cheating back in January.
      "FCA US is currently reviewing the complaint, but is disappointed that the DOJ-ENRD has chosen to file this lawsuit. The Company intends to defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the Company engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests," FCA said in a statement.
      Source: Detroit Free Press, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, U.S. Justice Department
      Press Release is on Page 2
      United States Files Complaint Against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles for Alleged Clean Air Act Violations
      The Department of Justice, on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), today filed a civil complaint in federal court in Detroit, Michigan, against FCA US LLC, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V., V.M. Motori S.p.A., and V.M. North America, Inc. (collectively referred to as FCA).  The complaint alleges that nearly 104,000 light duty diesel vehicles containing 3.0 liter EcoDiesel engines are equipped with software functions that were not disclosed to regulators during the certification application process, and that the vehicles contain defeat devices.  The complaint alleges that the undisclosed software functions cause the vehicles’ emission control systems to perform differently, and less effectively, during certain normal driving conditions than on federal emission tests, resulting in increased emissions of harmful air pollutants.
      The Clean Air Act requires vehicle manufacturers to obtain a certificate of conformity before introducing a vehicle into commerce, by demonstrating to EPA that the vehicle will meet applicable federal emission standards to control air pollution.  Manufacturers must disclose in their certification applications all auxiliary emission control devices (e.g. computer software that affects the performance of emission controls based upon operating parameters of the vehicle), justify the presence of any such devices, and explain why those that reduce the effectiveness of emission controls are not “defeat devices.”  Motor vehicles equipped with defeat devices cannot be certified.
      The complaint alleges that FCA equipped nearly 104,000 Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles (Model Years 2014-2016) sold in the United States with at least eight software-based features that were not disclosed in FCA’s applications for certificates of conformity and that affect the vehicles’ emission control systems.  The undisclosed software features lessen the effectiveness of the vehicles’ emissions control systems during certain normal driving situations.  This results in cars that meet emission standards in the laboratory and during standard EPA testing, but during certain normal on-road driving emit oxides of nitrogen (NOx) that are much higher than the EPA-compliant level.  The complaint alleges that each of these vehicles differs materially from the specifications provided to EPA in the certification applications, and thus the cars are uncertified, in violation of the Clean Air Act.  These allegations are consistent with those set forth in notice of violation (“NOV”) that EPA issued to FCA US LLC and FCA NV on Jan. 12, 2017.
      Following the issuance of the NOV, EPA continued its investigation into the operation of the undisclosed software-based features.  Based upon this investigation, the complaint alleges that one or more of these undisclosed software features, alone or in combination with the others, renders inoperative, bypasses and/or defeats the vehicles’ emission control systems, which were installed to make the vehicles comply with Clean Air Act emission standards.  In short, the complaint now alleges that the vehicles contain defeat devices.
      NOx pollution contributes to the formation of harmful smog and soot, exposure to which is linked to a number of respiratory- and cardiovascular-related health effects as well as premature death. Children, older adults, people who are active outdoors (including outdoor workers), and people with heart or lung disease are particularly at risk for health effects related to smog or soot exposure. Nitrogen dioxide formed by NOx emissions can aggravate respiratory diseases, particularly asthma, and may also contribute to asthma development in children.
      The civil complaint filed today seeks injunctive relief and the assessment of civil penalties.   The United States also filed a notice that it will request to transfer its case and fully participate in the pretrial proceedings now initiated in the related multi-district litigation in the Northern District of California. 
      EPA and the California Air Resources Board are continuing in their discussions with FCA to bring the subject vehicles into compliance with the Clean Air Act and California law.  The nature and timing of any resolution of this issue are uncertain.
      Response: Filing by DOJ-ENRD
      May 23, 2017 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - FCA US today issued the following statement in response to a civil lawsuit filed against the company by the Environmental and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ-ENRD”):
      FCA US has been working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) for many months, including extensive testing of the vehicles, to clarify issues related to the Company’s emissions control technology in model-year (MY) 2014-2016 Jeep® Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles.
       
      FCA US is currently reviewing the complaint, but is disappointed that the DOJ-ENRD has chosen to file this lawsuit. The Company intends to defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the Company engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests.
       
      As FCA US announced last week, it has developed updated emissions software calibrations that it believes address the concerns of EPA and CARB, and has now formally filed for diesel vehicle emissions certification with the regulators for its 2017 model year (MY) Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles. Subject to the permission of EPA and CARB, FCA US intends to install the same modified emissions software in 2014-2016 MY Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles. FCA US believes this will address the agencies’ concerns regarding the emissions software calibrations in those vehicles.
      FCA expects that the installation of these updated software calibrations will improve the 2014-2016 MY vehicles’ emissions performance and does not anticipate any impact on performance or fuel efficiency.
      Notwithstanding this lawsuit, the Company remains committed to working cooperatively with EPA and CARB to resolve the agencies’ concerns quickly and amicably.

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Fiat Chrysler Automobiles finds itself in hot water once again. Today, the U.S. Justice Department has filed a lawsuit against the company in Federal Court for using a “defeat device” on 104,000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 models equipped with the 3.0L EcoDiesel V6 from the 2014 to 2016 model years. This follows news from last week that FCA applied for certification the 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 EcoDiesel as they feature new emission software.
      "The complaint alleges that FCA equipped nearly 104,000 Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles (Model Years 2014-2016) sold in the United States with at least eight software-based features that were not disclosed in FCA’s applications for certificates of conformity and that affect the vehicles’ emission control systems.  The undisclosed software features lessen the effectiveness of the vehicles’ emissions control systems during certain normal driving situations.  This results in cars that meet emission standards in the laboratory and during standard EPA testing, but during certain normal on-road driving emit oxides of nitrogen (NOx) that are much higher than the EPA-compliant level," the Justice Department wrote in a statement today.
      As we reported last Thursday, the U.S. Justice Department was preparing a suit against FCA if an agreement couldn't be reached with the EPA. The two parties have been in discussions since the EPA first alleged the cheating back in January.
      "FCA US is currently reviewing the complaint, but is disappointed that the DOJ-ENRD has chosen to file this lawsuit. The Company intends to defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the Company engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests," FCA said in a statement.
      Source: Detroit Free Press, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, U.S. Justice Department
      Press Release is on Page 2
      United States Files Complaint Against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles for Alleged Clean Air Act Violations
      The Department of Justice, on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), today filed a civil complaint in federal court in Detroit, Michigan, against FCA US LLC, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V., V.M. Motori S.p.A., and V.M. North America, Inc. (collectively referred to as FCA).  The complaint alleges that nearly 104,000 light duty diesel vehicles containing 3.0 liter EcoDiesel engines are equipped with software functions that were not disclosed to regulators during the certification application process, and that the vehicles contain defeat devices.  The complaint alleges that the undisclosed software functions cause the vehicles’ emission control systems to perform differently, and less effectively, during certain normal driving conditions than on federal emission tests, resulting in increased emissions of harmful air pollutants.
      The Clean Air Act requires vehicle manufacturers to obtain a certificate of conformity before introducing a vehicle into commerce, by demonstrating to EPA that the vehicle will meet applicable federal emission standards to control air pollution.  Manufacturers must disclose in their certification applications all auxiliary emission control devices (e.g. computer software that affects the performance of emission controls based upon operating parameters of the vehicle), justify the presence of any such devices, and explain why those that reduce the effectiveness of emission controls are not “defeat devices.”  Motor vehicles equipped with defeat devices cannot be certified.
      The complaint alleges that FCA equipped nearly 104,000 Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles (Model Years 2014-2016) sold in the United States with at least eight software-based features that were not disclosed in FCA’s applications for certificates of conformity and that affect the vehicles’ emission control systems.  The undisclosed software features lessen the effectiveness of the vehicles’ emissions control systems during certain normal driving situations.  This results in cars that meet emission standards in the laboratory and during standard EPA testing, but during certain normal on-road driving emit oxides of nitrogen (NOx) that are much higher than the EPA-compliant level.  The complaint alleges that each of these vehicles differs materially from the specifications provided to EPA in the certification applications, and thus the cars are uncertified, in violation of the Clean Air Act.  These allegations are consistent with those set forth in notice of violation (“NOV”) that EPA issued to FCA US LLC and FCA NV on Jan. 12, 2017.
      Following the issuance of the NOV, EPA continued its investigation into the operation of the undisclosed software-based features.  Based upon this investigation, the complaint alleges that one or more of these undisclosed software features, alone or in combination with the others, renders inoperative, bypasses and/or defeats the vehicles’ emission control systems, which were installed to make the vehicles comply with Clean Air Act emission standards.  In short, the complaint now alleges that the vehicles contain defeat devices.
      NOx pollution contributes to the formation of harmful smog and soot, exposure to which is linked to a number of respiratory- and cardiovascular-related health effects as well as premature death. Children, older adults, people who are active outdoors (including outdoor workers), and people with heart or lung disease are particularly at risk for health effects related to smog or soot exposure. Nitrogen dioxide formed by NOx emissions can aggravate respiratory diseases, particularly asthma, and may also contribute to asthma development in children.
      The civil complaint filed today seeks injunctive relief and the assessment of civil penalties.   The United States also filed a notice that it will request to transfer its case and fully participate in the pretrial proceedings now initiated in the related multi-district litigation in the Northern District of California. 
      EPA and the California Air Resources Board are continuing in their discussions with FCA to bring the subject vehicles into compliance with the Clean Air Act and California law.  The nature and timing of any resolution of this issue are uncertain.
      Response: Filing by DOJ-ENRD
      May 23, 2017 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - FCA US today issued the following statement in response to a civil lawsuit filed against the company by the Environmental and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ-ENRD”):
      FCA US has been working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) for many months, including extensive testing of the vehicles, to clarify issues related to the Company’s emissions control technology in model-year (MY) 2014-2016 Jeep® Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles.
       
      FCA US is currently reviewing the complaint, but is disappointed that the DOJ-ENRD has chosen to file this lawsuit. The Company intends to defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the Company engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests.
       
      As FCA US announced last week, it has developed updated emissions software calibrations that it believes address the concerns of EPA and CARB, and has now formally filed for diesel vehicle emissions certification with the regulators for its 2017 model year (MY) Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles. Subject to the permission of EPA and CARB, FCA US intends to install the same modified emissions software in 2014-2016 MY Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 diesel vehicles. FCA US believes this will address the agencies’ concerns regarding the emissions software calibrations in those vehicles.
      FCA expects that the installation of these updated software calibrations will improve the 2014-2016 MY vehicles’ emissions performance and does not anticipate any impact on performance or fuel efficiency.
      Notwithstanding this lawsuit, the Company remains committed to working cooperatively with EPA and CARB to resolve the agencies’ concerns quickly and amicably.
    • By William Maley
      As if Fiat Chrysler Automobiles didn't have enough things on its plate, there is talk about the U.S. Justice Department readying a lawsuit over alleged violations of U.S. clean-air rules with their diesel vehicles
      Bloomberg learned from two sources that the Justice Department is preparing a lawsuit against FCA alleging the company used illegal defeat devices on models equipped with the 3.0L EcoDiesel V6. The defeat devices in question disable emission controls to improve performance. Sources go on to say the lawsuit could be filed this week if negotiations between FCA and the U.S. Government fail to resolve the differences.
      Back in January, the EPA accused FCA of violating diesel emission standards on 104,000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 models equipped with the 3.0L EcoDiesel from 2014 to 2016 model years. The company did not disclose eight different software programs installed on the 3.0L EcoDiesel, which is a violation of the Clean Air Act.
      Since then, the two have been in negotiations to try and resolve these issues according to a source.
      “In the case of any litigation, FCA US will defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the company deliberately installed defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests. The company believes that any litigation would be counterproductive to ongoing discussions with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board,” FCA said in a emailed statement.
      Spokespeople for the EPA and Justice Department declined to comment.
      Source: Bloomberg

      View full article
  • Who's Online (See full list)