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William Maley

Finally! Ford Confirms Ranger and Bronco Plans: Comments

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It has been no secret that Ford is planning to bring back the Ranger and Bronco - thank you UAW. But Ford has been mum on it, saying no comment and the like when asked about it. But they have finally come clean today. During their press conference this morning at the Detroit Auto Show, Ford announced that the Ranger and Bronco will be coming.

“We’ve heard our customers loud and clear. They want a new generation of vehicles that are incredibly capable yet fun to drive. Ranger is for truck buyers who want an affordable, functional, rugged and maneuverable pickup that’s Built Ford Tough. Bronco will be a no-compromise midsize 4x4 utility for thrill seekers who want to venture way beyond the city,” said Joe Hinrichs, Ford’s president of The Americas.

The Ranger will debut in 2019, while the Bronco will follow a year later. Both models will be built at Ford's Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, MI. They'll take the place of the Focus and C-Max which will move to Mexico.

Details are slim for both models, but Ford's Executive Chairman Bill Ford noted that the Bronco will use the T-6 midsize truck platform (what underpins the Ranger).

Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)


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Very nice.  i am excited for the Bronco, though I am hoping for something closer to the original small Bronco, still midsize shouldn't be too big. 

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32 minutes ago, William Maley said:

Bronco will be a no-compromise midsize 4x4 utility for thrill seekers who want to venture way beyond the city,” said Joe Hinrichs, Ford’s president of The Americas.

This is intriguing.. Sounds very off-road-like and that's gnarly.

I hope they give it some hard edges and not CUV curves.

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13 hours ago, ccap41 said:

This is intriguing.. Sounds very off-road-like and that's gnarly.

I hope they give it some hard edges and not CUV curves.

Agreed.....want this to give Jeep a run for their money....

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No surprise here. It was only a matter of when not if.

Now what will it look like as I do not expect the Show truck they keep showing.

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