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Drew Dowdell

Chevrolet News:Corvette C8 Almost Sold Out Already

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11 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

Another angle to the no manual detail is they didn't want to a hole in the tunnel...also read there were packaging issues.   Also it's cheaper to only have to engineer one transmission.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/autos-sports/the-real-reason-the-new-c8-corvette-isnt-available-with-a-manual-transmission/ar-AAF1wMm

It doesn’t make much financial sense at all to offer a manual at all since there are only five or six people that can drive a stick these days lol. Once companies like Ferrari and Porsche were cutting them out, the writing was on the wall for cars like the Corvette. 

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@Robert Hall @surreal1272 After having searched for and posted the follow up info especially GM's own post about this design from the begining was built with ICE, Hybrid and EV in mind plus with no engine in the front, it left far more room for folks over 6' tall to easily get into and out of, I have to say I am EXCITED 🎉 to actually go and sit in one and maybe even take it for a test drive. If all 6'6" 300 lbs of me can fit, who knows I might just have my first sports car ever.

In response to all the aches and pains we have in our body, as a past life body builder and power lifter, my C1 to C6 are bone on bone and I was given two options, fuse and limit my quality of life, or workout and stay strong for life as to why I am a daily work out man in the GYM. I can still ski and pretty much do everything I want as long as I keep my CORE strong. 

I can tell when I take more than a day off from lifting so for me lifting / cardio is 5 to 6 days a week with a single down day for recovery.

I do not plan to ever retire in the baby boomer sense of retirement, but am sure I will have a different type of job by the time I am 70. Hope I can have a sporty ride in those silver years, that would be very cool.

I have to say that my favorite corvette was the Stingray from Corvette Summer, the movie 1978.

See the source image

But now I am really liking this C8, grows on me more and more every day. I can understand why it would sell out especially if they end up going hybrid / EV, then these first few ICE models will be real collectors editions.

 

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3 hours ago, dfelt said:

I can understand why it would sell out especially if they end up going hybrid / EV, then these first few ICE models will be real collectors editions.

:roflmao:

Oh, once it loses its soul, sales WILL taper off.

Edited by ocnblu
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13 hours ago, surreal1272 said:

Again, in case you missed it the first time, it is a Corvette, regardless of the aftermarket job on it, so it is not irrelevant to discussions about the  Corvette. The same would apply to the Escape if it something brought up on a thread about the Escape. You’re just grasping at straws for some reason and making up your own criteria for what you find interesting (like your C8 example. It doesn’t make the mention of an EV C7 any less irrelevant. The point here is that this is a Vette article and it is not irrelevant to bring up other Vette models, aftermarket or otherwise. 

To each their own. I find it completely irrelevant and that's okay. You find it relevant and that's okay. 

13 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

Also it's cheaper to only have to engineer one transmission.

There it is. It's CHEAPER

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@Robert Hall @surreal1272 I honestly would NOT say it is cheaper to do a Manual transmission any longer, but that form of transmission is so inefficient and the lack of interest by the bulk of society to drive a manual with the advent of paddle shifters thanks to F1 driving has moved society to want something that is even faster.

I rarely have seen manuals at the drag strip here in washington any more, usually more of an older sports car on open day when folks can drag their auto against anyone. There is also real talent needed if you were to drive a paddle shift corvette just like a manual. I think many who feel you have to have a manual transmission just have not had a chance to really learn to drive paddle shift auto's.

I relate this to those that felt putting a manual on the floor was a terrible idea compared to the 3 on the tree design that I first learned to drive on. The more technology changes, the better things get, clinging to the past is how one dies early in the business world.

I honestly doubt other than a few I can count on one hand that the bulk of folks here at C&G would want to drive a modern day auto with 3 on the tree or a 4 speed manual especially if you live in a city of hills like San Francisco. 

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I've never experienced a column shift manual, but learned to drive with a typical '80s 5spd floor shift manual.  I've owned cars w/ 4 and 5 speed manuals,  would like to own something with a modern 6 speed manual...I still enjoy driving w/ a manual on occasion.   But in the real world grind an automatic is fine.  Never got into the flappy paddle thing, my Jeep has them but I don't see any point.  Maybe a sports car with a DCT and flappy paddles could be fun, though. 

Edited by Robert Hall

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5 minutes ago, Robert Hall said:

I've never experienced a column shift manual, but learned to drive with a typical '80s 5spd floor shift manual.  I've owned cars w/ 4 and 5 speed manuals,  would like to own something with a modern 6 speed manual...I still enjoy driving w/ a manual on occasion.   But in the real world grind an automatic is fine.  Never got into the flappy paddle thing, my Jeep has them but I don't see any point.  Maybe something with a DCT and flappy paddles could be fun. 

Functionally, a DCT is just a really fast automatic. 

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1 minute ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Functionally, a DCT is just a really fast automatic. 

But different from an ordinary automatic w/ flappy paddles.  

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Just now, Robert Hall said:

But different from an ordinary automatic w/ flappy paddles.  

not really, just faster at shifting. 

I wonder what ever happened to GM's "No Lift Shift" that they had on the Cobalt, ATS-V, and CTS-V?  I wonder if the CT4-V and CT5-V will have it. 

On the manual shifter on the C8, I think they expected the take rate to be very low that they didn't want to bother with the engineering and certifications. 

 

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RIP to the manual transmission.  Died because of lack of interest by car buyers.

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52 minutes ago, dfelt said:

There is also real talent needed if you were to drive a paddle shift corvette just like a manual.

Bull. Sh!t.

Not even comparable.

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8 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Bull. Sh!t.

Not even comparable.

Agree to disagree, you should try racing someone and see how you drive it and hit redline shifting up and down. Driving takes skill period and to drive a manual or paddle shifting to optimize power, torque and turn in a consistent time, does take skill.

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I've driven both and there is absolutely no way it takes the same level of skill to drive an auto as a manual. 

I actually didn't think I would ever see the day where somebody would actually say that it takes the same amount of skill to flip a paddle as it does to bang through gears in a manual transmission. 

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Driving fast well takes a lot of skill, driving fast with manual transmission takes more skill than with automatic, period.  Try to do all the correct steering and brake inputs while correctly doing heel and toe shifting...

Having said that, and being a big manual fan (I drive manual daily too), I think it was a good decision to make C8 auto only.  Not only from financial stand point and the hull integrity point, but also as a high level performance car that is going to compete with exotics but cost enough for many people to actually take it to a track. 

The good news is IMO, that it comes with DCT, which I think is the best compromise between manual and auto transmissions.  I think it is probably the future for sports cars.

Edited by ykX
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1 hour ago, dfelt said:

Agree to disagree, you should try racing someone and see how you drive it and hit redline shifting up and down. Driving takes skill period and to drive a manual or paddle shifting to optimize power, torque and turn in a consistent time, does take skill.

Now try doing all of that with two feet and three pedals instead of one foot and two pedals.  It definitely takes more skill and coordination to do.  I can drive a stick, but I'm not as good on the track with one as I am with an auto. 

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14 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Now try doing all of that with two feet and three pedals instead of one foot and two pedals.  It definitely takes more skill and coordination to do.  I can drive a stick, but I'm not as good on the track with one as I am with an auto. 

I get what you all say and yes 2 feet, 3 pedals will always challenge humans. Yet there is more to driving than just that and paddle driving brings in a different way of driving is all I am saying and still shifting up and down while driving will always offer challenges along with so many other inputs.

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28 minutes ago, dfelt said:

I get what you all say and yes 2 feet, 3 pedals will always challenge humans. Yet there is more to driving than just that and paddle driving brings in a different way of driving is all I am saying and still shifting up and down while driving will always offer challenges along with so many other inputs.

Sorry... but just no.  The extra coordination required is why the automatic has taken over from the manual.

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6 hours ago, Potluck said:

Because they want to text and drive. 

amateurs. i learned to text and drive with a manual just fine. 

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1 hour ago, FAPTurbo said:

amateurs. i learned to text and drive with a manual just fine. 

What's the name of the manual, "Driving And Texting For Dummies"?

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I learned to drive before cell phones or cupholders.  In olden days, i remember trying to drink coffee and eat a bagel while driving in a car w/ a manual..

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Manuals are dead, automatics shift faster, get better gas mileage, etc.  Total waste of money to engineer a vehicle to take a manual, and to design a manual transmission to put in it. 

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8 hours ago, dfelt said:

Agree to disagree, you should try racing someone and see how you drive it and hit redline shifting up and down. Driving takes skill period and to drive a manual or paddle shifting to optimize power, torque and turn in a consistent time, does take skill.

Yeah, I’m with the others here. It takes far more hand/foot to eye coordination to sling a manual around the track than literally any other transmission currently made. Paddle shifters are literally child’s play compared to manuals and I also have driven both while literally being raised on a manual. 

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I hear ya all, paddle shifters and automatics are no more challenging to each other and manual is still even more challenging than that, got it. :P 

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10 hours ago, smk4565 said:

Manuals are dead, automatics shift faster, get better gas mileage, etc.  Total waste of money to engineer a vehicle to take a manual, and to design a manual transmission to put in it. 

Technically that might be true, but changing gears by yourself while driving on a curvy road on a nice sunny day in a nice sports car is one of the greatest pleasures a car ENTHUSIAST can have. 

Only a small fraction of sports car buyers actually take their cars to a track or care about extra couple seconds.  There is a reason why Porsche, BMW and some other sport car manufacturers go back to offering manual transmission at least on some of their models.

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