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    Rumorpile: General Motors Cans Cadillac Ultraluxury Sedan


    William Maley

    Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

    June 29, 2013

    Last night, Automotive News broke some big news concerning Cadillac. Sources say that executives have put on ice a new super luxury sedan that would have competed with the likes of Bentley and Rolls-Royce. The reason is due to the investment not being justifiable.

    A brief refresher: Back in 2011, we began hearing rumors of a new RWD platform with the codename of Omega. Omega was to spawn two new Cadillac flagships; one that would take on the likes of the BMW 7-Series and Mercedes-Benz S-Class; and a super luxury sedan.

    Now, development of Omega and the S-Class competitor is still on and is expected to come out sometime in 2016 or 2017.

    Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required)

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    Makes sense. The wording on the other forum made this look like a seriously discounted 7-Series, etc. fighter would be offered, while I think the wording here hints at a proper 7-Series, etc. fighter the same way the 2014 CTS is aimed more precisely against the 5-Series, etc.

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    Exactly.

    and besides, it's always been my opinion that the topper on Cadillac's lineup that would garner the most buzz would always be a well styled big Coupe (potentialy a convertible option too) like an Eldorado or something that would go against the Mercedes CL. Certainly from someone who would prefer to see some variety in the lineup at least, two big sedans doesn't make an awful lot of sense at this point in time.

    It's pretty crazy that they were seriously thinking about building a RR competitor in the first place, and who knows? Maybe it will happen someday. One thing is for certain, in order to sell a car like that and be taken seriously, perhaps even to sell a CL competitor or an S-Class competitor, there are other things they need to do first. We are just now seeing how much traction they have gained with the ATS, and the sales of the CTS will really be anybody's guess at this point. Additionally, Cadillac's dealer and customer experience are just not at the level they need to be. If there isn't an internal goal to offer the same level of service that Lexus does within five years, then people need to be fired. You can't sell a $200k + sedan out of dealerships that look like this:

    5743798.JPG

    Or this:

    0415B_L8CADILLAC.jpg

    Come on.

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    Exactly.

    and besides, it's always been my opinion that the topper on Cadillac's lineup that would garner the most buzz would always be a well styled big Coupe (potentialy a convertible option too) like an Eldorado or something that would go against the Mercedes CL. Certainly from someone who would prefer to see some variety in the lineup at least, two big sedans doesn't make an awful lot of sense at this point in time.

    Funny you should mention that.. From the Automotive News story,

    The person said that Cadillac executives are weighing a number of other niche vehicles to push the boundaries of Cadillac's revitalized lineup.

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    Not sure if I buy this. Too often things are on, off, on, off etc.

    I suspect that there may have been some timing changes as Cadillac has work to do before they pop a large big buck car out. I expected a $75K-120K car from the start and it is doable. The S should be the target here for now. Later on once they have established themselves as the choice car to be seen in and drive then offer the over the top car.

    The real key here is what can they also use the Omega for to cover the development cost on this platform. One car will not do it and there are few other large cars GM will ever offer again.

    Anyways we have heard so many times the ATS coupe was canned and yet it just appeared not long ago in cammo.

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    Cadillac has yet to succeed above $60k, so no sense going after Rolls or Bentley. They need a $50-65k CTS to succeed, then to go after the XJ, A8, S-class and 7-series. But even the A8 which is a well reviewed car struggles to sell. Cadillac could build an all-star car and still only sell 6,000 a year, that gamble makes me wonder how committed they are to a big luxury sedan.

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    how much longer will cars be seen as luxury props.......

    As long as people have the disposable income they will use them to enhance their image. That is the point of most purchases in this range.

    I know many who hide their income and worth and you would never know their worth while others display it or try to show they have more than they have.

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    how much longer will cars be seen as luxury props.......

    Always. There will always be people who want to flaunt their (apparent) wealth with a large luxury car. The Genesis sedan and the Equus are simply ballin' on a budget. Cadillac should aim for S-Class/7 series territory, if only to show the automotive world they are truly serious. Besides, have you been near or inside a 7 series or an S-Class? Both cars are flagships for a reason. Cadillac needs a true flagship. Caddy does NOT need to beat RR/Bently because they have not been anywhere near that since the 1930s. A 21st century Duesenberg could handle that role, not Cadillac.

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    The real key here is what can they also use the Omega for to cover the development cost on this platform. One car will not do it and there are few other large cars GM will ever offer again.

    Agreed. China/Australia could perhaps get a Buick Park-Avenue / Holden Caprice built on Omega... For Cadillac, I'd say a large coupe is perhaps the more logical way to go, but... To be honest it seems kind of foggy, unless Omega ends up sharing a lot with Alpha and being a reworked/reinforced Alpha in the sense than it can accommodate 200in-plus cars...

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    I suspect that the Omega would share some things and be a reworked Alpha. As the Volume would be low enough that it would be difficult to spread this model out too much even with Buick in China and Opel in Europe.

    I always considered the LTS a S fighter and a flag ship. Once they connect with this car then they could move to other aspirations of higher models. I would love to see them do a Bentley GT coupe/convertible first and not another sedan and or 2 seat sports car. I think they could pull this one off and build on to a sedan later.

    Bentley is a obtainable goal but they have work to do first and a lot of other needed product to do before they jump in the deep end. You must be considered and seen as a true contender before you can compete in these higher classes. Image in these classes are just as important as anything else.


    But Cadillac needs to learn to walk the walk here before they try to dance.

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    how much longer will cars be seen as luxury props.......

    Always. There will always be people who want to flaunt their (apparent) wealth with a large luxury car. The Genesis sedan and the Equus are simply ballin' on a budget. Cadillac should aim for S-Class/7 series territory, if only to show the automotive world they are truly serious. Besides, have you been near or inside a 7 series or an S-Class? Both cars are flagships for a reason. Cadillac needs a true flagship. Caddy does NOT need to beat RR/Bently because they have not been anywhere near that since the 1930s. A 21st century Duesenberg could handle that role, not Cadillac.

    well.. 1950s... but otherwise I agree.

    cadillac-eldorado-brougham-1957-737ad.jp

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    The V16 cars of the 30's were seen of high value to people with money. They could compete with Dusey, Packard and even Rolls back then.

    Today If given time to improve their image to being a class leader in all segments they could tackle this if they chose. Just it can not just be a larger LTS and it has to be something special.

    Bentley today is high end but a much more common car today as I see them often even here in Ohio and even in the middle of winter. They and Maserati have become the choice of those who want to be seen differently then the traditional BMW and Benz crowd.

    Rolls is not as common for two reasons they are even more expensive and for the most part they are ugly. One of the few new Rolls I see here in Akron is Lebron James Rolls but even he does not drive it often as he spends more time in his other toys from Ferrari or even the family truckster they use to take the family out shopping or out to eat. .

    Cadillac needs to focus on the ATS, LTS and the CTS to make them the best in class. Then we can revisit this.

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    I was never a fan for going the Super Luxury route yet... I feel it's a waste. I'd love to see Cadillac successfully fight a 7-series, A8, S-class. I don't think they have it in them just yet, but they're close. I feel that's where they should focus their attentions right now.

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    "Rolls" has enjoyed some true longevity in the cache of the name, but the factual matter is that the brand slipped far behind being any sort of class leader sometime in the 1920s. Rolls didn't get an 8-cylinder until 1959 IIRC, or FORTY-FIVE YEARS after Cadillac introduce theirs. A/C didn't appear until sometime circa the mid '50s, or around 15 years after Cadillac. By the mid '60s, a Rolls had circa a whopping 215 HP and couldn't lumber out of it's own way. Most of the styling was a full decade behind the industry and there was no engineering department... at all. It was a well built car; well built but boring, archaic and spartanly-equipped with poor performance in every metric.

    The only buzz up to that point was the short-lived appearance of the ungainly Camargue in the late '70s. Google up a pic of the interior and gape at that black rubber school bus steering wheel (finish/design, not diameter). Whew.

    To state it accurately, Rolls first ceased to be competitive with Cadillac about 85 years ago.

    But, as with the case with Rolls today, a proper product can turn things around 180 degrees. I actually like the current Rolls (via pics; I've yet to see one in person). A proper Cadillac could absolutely compete in the ultra-lux / Rolls level... but whether now is the time, is another matter. Agree that the s-class level is much more important, now & long-term.

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    Not true as while Cadillac on the option sheet could beat the flying lady in image and prestige Cadillac has not competed since the custom body V16 cars.

    Rolls was never really that great of a technical car but they have built heritage and image on styling and hand craftsman's ship. Also for a long time as one of the most expensive cars you can buy. Today they are just a large over priced ugly BMW.

    Until Cadillac has gotten the rest of their products in line they will not have the image to produce such a car. Even for Benz the Maybach failed as it never had the styling and was seen as many as just a over priced Benz.

    Lets get the rest of the new lines out and see where the market is and go from there. Lets face it if the LTS is not class leading then why bother with a even more expensive model. Right now the money is in the mid priced expensive cars in the 100K-175K range and they can look into that at some point but being there is not going to make or break Cadillac. The ATS and CTS being better than all other is where Cadillac's future image lies.

    BMW's present image was built with the 3 series not with buying Rolls Royce. If anything I think they have hurt Rolls more then helped them with their styling.

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    ^ You are incorrect and ignore the Eldorado Brougham Drew posted, leaps & bounds over any Rolls that decade or the following TWO. World's better car with a better image to boot.

    In the '30s Cadillac had V8s, V12s and V16s while all Rolls offered was a 6. "Competed" then? More like 'blew out of the water'. Rolls existed sheerly on quality of craftsmanship, but that's hardly enough to be 'competitive'. Which it wasn't.

    Image is made on the back of product. Build the product and the image always follows, not the other way around. You know Pontiac & their image circa 1954, and what occurred over the next 10 years, right?

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    Seems to me that Cadillac ought to find diversity in variants of its existing models first, before it tackles a Rolls beater.

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    Get the ATS and CTS right; that's 80% of the pie. They can worry about the S-class segment later. Besides, it doesn't really have to be a brang new platform. It can be a double-stretched Alpha with widened sills.

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    Seems to me that Cadillac ought to find diversity in variants of its existing models first, before it tackles a Rolls beater.

    Pretty much: Cadillac's game right now is to build a solid product structure by covering the key bases (core models and variants of those) and if successful, then take the high-end gamble with a fully dedicated model. Platform sharing (Omega), yes, but no commonality in visible parts other than the Cadillac badge.

    @ dwightlooi - Maybe that's exactly what Omega is? An adaptation of Alpha to larger vehicles?

    Edited by ZL-1
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    ^ You are incorrect and ignore the Eldorado Brougham Drew posted, leaps & bounds over any Rolls that decade or the following TWO. World's better car with a better image to boot.

    In the '30s Cadillac had V8s, V12s and V16s while all Rolls offered was a 6. "Competed" then? More like 'blew out of the water'. Rolls existed sheerly on quality of craftsmanship, but that's hardly enough to be 'competitive'. Which it wasn't.

    Image is made on the back of product. Build the product and the image always follows, not the other way around. You know Pontiac & their image circa 1954, and what occurred over the next 10 years, right?

    Image Is part product but much of it is Marketing! Lets face it some of the most popular cars today have great public Images and many are just ok cars.

    With Pontiac and I am a Pontiac fan the keys to their changes were in styling risks and with good solid marketing. Wanger was and is yet today full of hot air but he marketed the Pontiac image. While he talks a lot about the GTO today his marketing affected every Pontiac.

    Look at the imagery of the Fitzpatrick and Kaufman illustrations. Today they are considered art work and back then it sold a image and perception of these cars.

    While Pontiac did many things to change them they still started with the same damn platform Chevy was given as well as Buick and Olds in most of their cars. They learned to get the look down, how to market it and used performance and racing to present it.

    Pontiac in the last few years was not really getting the look down on some cars and they were a performance division that really had no performance out side two cars.

    Cadillac has the look and they are damn close on the performance. They only lack a few minor things that I expect them to fix. I only wish they would take the advertising to the next level. The S class is needed as this is a three model class of cars. The XTS is ok but it not what they really need in a flag ship. Having a FWD car is ok but it should not be your flag ship even with AWD.

    Cadillac can move up but they first need to earn the right to do so. The direction they are going shows they can do it but the fact is they still have to do it and it takes time to redeem an image from where they placed it. They will earn the customers trust but lets let the ATS and CTS have some time to do their work. In the mean time GM needs to address any and all issues asap and make these cars best in class with no reservations.

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    Cadillac is no where near being ready to go after Rolls or Bentley, they probably never will be. Rolls-Royce can charge $400,000+ for a Phantom, that is rarefied air. You could argue that the Hyundai Equus is closer to an top end luxury sedan than anything Cadillac as. GM let Cadillac's image weaken in the 1970s, then dragged it through the mud in the 80s, 90s, and it wasn't until around 2003 when they starting to pump some life back into it.

    They have yet to prove they can challenge the 5-series and E-class, let along climbing up the ladder. The ATS and CTS are where to start, if those cars succeed, then it is time for an S-class level car, but you have to go all in, or it will flop. It would probably be the biggest R&D budget GM has ever put into a car.

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    mercedes is also no where near ready to go after rolls/bentley- they tried & failed. mercedes cannot even get sticker on the s-class.

    5-series/e-class 'challenge' has already been met & matched with the 3rd gen CTS; 3-series has been eclipsed by the ATS. Volume should follow, but the german twins have already reached mainstream volume levels- they have whored out exclusivity for profits. Cadillac should keep their volume contained, avoid the gab-ass minivans/ econoboxes/ cargo trucks and build on exclusivity. Lower volume, higher profit should be the goal.

    Image is made on the back of product. Build the product and the image always follows, not the other way around. You know Pontiac & their image circa 1954, and what occurred over the next 10 years, right?

    While Pontiac did many things to change them they still started with the same damn platform Chevy was given as well as Buick and Olds in most of their cars. They learned to get the look down, how to market it and used performance and racing to present it.

    If you are referring to the period I mentioned, they certainly were not "the same damn 'platforms'" (no 'platforms'; BOF cars). Each Division in this era (thru the early '60s) designed their own. Buick's was totally unique out of the five '59s. Only thing Pontiac & Chevy started out with was the same damned body shell mounting points & the same greenhouses... the rest was proprietary.

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    mercedes is also no where near ready to go after rolls/bentley- they tried & failed. mercedes cannot even get sticker on the s-class.

    5-series/e-class 'challenge' has already been met & matched with the 3rd gen CTS; 3-series has been eclipsed by the ATS. Volume should follow, but the german twins have already reached mainstream volume levels- they have whored out exclusivity for profits. Cadillac should keep their volume contained, avoid the gab-ass minivans/ econoboxes/ cargo trucks and build on exclusivity. Lower volume, higher profit should be the goal.

    Image is made on the back of product. Build the product and the image always follows, not the other way around. You know Pontiac & their image circa 1954, and what occurred over the next 10 years, right?

    While Pontiac did many things to change them they still started with the same damn platform Chevy was given as well as Buick and Olds in most of their cars. They learned to get the look down, how to market it and used performance and racing to present it.

    If you are referring to the period I mentioned, they certainly were not "the same damn 'platforms'" (no 'platforms'; BOF cars). Each Division in this era (thru the early '60s) designed their own. Buick's was totally unique out of the five '59s. Only thing Pontiac & Chevy started out with was the same damned body shell mounting points & the same greenhouses... the rest was proprietary.

    Calm down I was speaking of the 60's as many of the platforms were melding together at that time. Not as bad as later as they each had their little tricks but they did share a lot more than many want to admit. But on the other hand it makes it easier to restore them today.

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    ^ "1954 & next 10 years" equals 1964- still different.
    Too many like to brush off Divisional engineering with an offhanded 'they've always been the same damn thing'. I've watched this with a focused eye occur on the internet over the last 15 years, but it needs to be corrected before we get to the point that 'the Cadillac V-12 was just 2 Chevy straight sixes welded together.' Slippery slope and all that. ;)

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      Evolution is the impression you get when walking around the XT5. Cadillac’s designers didn’t make any drastic changes to the design profile aside from softening the Art & Science design language. The front now features a comically-large grille and headlights with a strand of LEDs that run into the bumper. Towards the back is an integrated spoiler that extends the roofline, a set of large taillights, and a rear bumper that comes with chrome exhaust ports and a faux skid plate. The XT5 does lose some of the polarizing details that made the SRX stand out, but it still stands out slightly in what is becoming a crowded class.
      Cadillac has been stepping up its game in terms of their interiors with their new models. Case in point is the XT5. Our top-line Platinum tester featured faux suede, leather, and wood trim on a number of surfaces that make it look and feel quite luxurious. We’re glad to see the removal of the Piano Black panel for the center stack as it looked out of place and was a magnet for fingerprints. One design idea we’re not so keen on is the gear selector. Instead of a lever, Cadillac went with a joystick controller to engage the various gears. The controller isn’t intuitive as you’ll find yourself going into the wrong gear or not going into one at all on a somewhat regular basis. You will get the hang of it after a bit, but you can’t help but wonder why Cadillac decided to change this in the first place.
      The leather used for the seats feel quite supple and help fix the issue of uncomfortable seats in the SRX. Interior space has grown, thanks to a two-inch increase in the wheelbase. Rear legroom has grown 3.2 inches and it allows anyone sitting back there to stretch out. Headroom is still slightly tight thanks in part to our tester coming with the optional panoramic sunroof. But this can be alleviated by recalling the rear seat slightly. Cargo space in smack dab in the middle - 30 cubic feet with the rear seats up and 63 cubic feet when folded.
      Cadillac User Interface (CUE) has been one of our least favorite infotainment systems to use since it was introduced a few years ago. The litany of problems ranging from a touch sensitive buttons not responding to inputs to the system crashing have dragged Cadillac down. But the system has been getting a number of changes and updates over the past few years. For starters, Cadillac has removed most of the touch-sensitive buttons from the system. Being able to press an actual button to turn on the heated/ventilated seats or adjust the temperature is really nice. It is a shame Cadillac didn’t bring back an actual volume knob for CUE - the touch-sensitive strip is still there. But at least there are volume controls on the steering wheel that allow you to avoid it. The system itself has been overhauled with a faster processor and a slightly improved interface. The changes make a difference as the system is snappier and a little bit easier to understand. If you still find CUE a bit overwhelming, you’ll be happy to know that CUE now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration.
      Cadillac bucks the trend in the midsize luxury crossover class by only offering one engine - a 3.6L V6 producing 310 horsepower and 271 pound-feet of torque (@ 5,000 rpm). This comes paired with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive. The V6 is the weak link in the XT5. When leaving a stop, it takes a moment for the engine to realize the accelerator pedal has been pressed before it starts working. This is even worse when you’re trying to make a pass as it seems the engine was busy taking a nap before it was hastily woken up. Once the engine is awake, it takes its time to get up to speed. There is a positive to the V6 engine and that is the stop-start system. Unlike some previous systems that are slow to restart the engine or do so in a very rough fashion, Cadillac’s system is quick and smooth when you let off the brake. The eight-speed automatic seems reluctant to downshift at times. We’re guessing this transmission was calibrated for fuel economy. At least the eight-speed automatic delivers smooth shifts.
      Fuel economy figures for the 2017 Cadillac XT5 all-wheel drive stand at 18 City/26 Highway/21 Combined. Our average fuel economy for the week landed around 22.3 mpg in mostly city driving. 
      One characteristic we liked about the SRX was its comfortable ride. Yes, it flies in the face of Cadillac’s message of beating the German’s at their own handling game. But buyers loved the smoothness on offer. Sadly, the XT5 loses a bit of the smoothness. Despite our tester featuring an adaptive suspension system, the XT5 wasn’t able to fully iron out bumps. Some of this can be attributed to 20-inch wheels fitted to our tester. At least the XT5 keeps road and wind noise out of the interior. Like the SRX, the XT5 isn’t sporty. Body motions are kept in check, but the light weight and nonexistent feel from the steering puts a halt to that idea. 
      An item Cadillac has been touting on the XT5 is the Rear Camera Mirror. Available only on the top-line Platinum, the mirror can stream the view from the rear camera by flicking a switch. We found this to be really helpful when backing out of parking lots as it gave a view that isn’t hindered by the thick rear pillars. Hopefully, Cadillac spreads this feature down to other trims of the XT5. 
      In some respects, the 2017 Cadillac XT5 is a step forward. The model improves on certain parts of the SRX such as a more luxurious and spacious interior, improved CUE system, and sharper looks. But in other respects, Cadillac messed up with the XT5. The 3.6L V6 needs to be shown the door and a new engine that offers better low-end performance to take its place. The loss of the smooth ride that the SRX was known for hurts the XT5 as well. Finally, there is the price. Our XT5 Platinum tester came with an as-tested price of $69,985. It is a nice crossover. But if we’re dropping close $70,000 on a luxury crossover, we can think of a few models that would be ahead of the XT5.
      It should be noted that the Cadillac XT5 has taken the place of the SRX of being the brand’s best selling model. At the end of 2016, Cadillac moved 39,485 XT5s. But unlike the SRX which we could recommend without hesitation, the XT5 comes with a number of caveats that we cannot do the same.
      Disclaimer: Cadillac Provided the XT5, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2017
      Make: Cadillac
      Model: SRX
      Trim: Platinum
      Engine: 3.6L V6 VVT DI
      Driveline: Nine-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 310 @ 6,700
      Torque @ RPM: 271 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 18/26/21
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Spring Hill, TN
      Base Price: $62,500
      As Tested Price: $69,985 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Driver Assist Package - $2,340.00
      20-inch Wheels - $2,095.00
      Trailering Equipment - $575.00
      Black Ice Body Side Moldings - $355.00
      Compact Spare Tire - $350.00
      Black Ice License Plate Bar - $310.00
      Black Roof Rails - $295.00
      Black Splash Guards - $170.00
    • By William Maley
      Cadillac is going to have a quiet 2017, but 2018 looks to be a blockbuster year as the first of their needed crossovers will launch - the compact XT3. Thanks to a spy photographer, we have gotten our first look at it.
      General Motors' camouflage department did a really good job of covering up the XT3, so we can't really tell much about the design except that it looks like an even smaller XT5. One detail they weren't able to cover up is the intercooler, leading us to believe that the XT3 will come with turbocharged power - most likely the 2.0L turbo. A nine-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive is likely. Platform-wise, expect the XT3 to use the underpinnings of the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain.
      Source: Car and Driver

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Cadillac is going to have a quiet 2017, but 2018 looks to be a blockbuster year as the first of their needed crossovers will launch - the compact XT3. Thanks to a spy photographer, we have gotten our first look at it.
      General Motors' camouflage department did a really good job of covering up the XT3, so we can't really tell much about the design except that it looks like an even smaller XT5. One detail they weren't able to cover up is the intercooler, leading us to believe that the XT3 will come with turbocharged power - most likely the 2.0L turbo. A nine-speed automatic and the choice of front or all-wheel drive is likely. Platform-wise, expect the XT3 to use the underpinnings of the Chevrolet Equinox and GMC Terrain.
      Source: Car and Driver
    • By William Maley
      GM Announces January U.S. Sales, Affirms Positive Outlook
      DETROIT — General Motors (NYSE: GM) U.S. dealers delivered 195,909 cars, trucks and crossovers in January, down 3.8 percent year over year. Retail sales totaled 155,010 units, down 4.9 percent, and the company set a new January record for average transaction prices.
      “In early January, we focused on profitability while key competitors sold down their large stocks of deeply discounted, old-model-year pickups,” said Kurt McNeil, U.S. vice president of Sales Operations. “We gained considerable sales momentum as we rebuilt our mid-size pickup, SUV and compact crossover inventories from very low levels following record-setting December sales.”
      Inventories of most of these products were in the 30 – 50 days’ supply range at the beginning of January.
      January Highlights (vs. Jan. 2016)
      GM estimates that the seasonally adjusted annual selling rate (SAAR) for light vehicles was approximately 17.6 million units. GM’s ATPs, which reflect retail transaction prices after incentives, rose $1,200 per unit to $34,500, a new January record.  GM was the only domestic automaker and one of only two full-line automakers to reduce incentives as a percentage of ATP. GM spending was 12.7 percent, down 0.3 points, and the industry average was 12.3 percent, up 1.3 points. Rental deliveries were down 1 percent. Total fleet sales were up 1 percent on a 12 percent increase in Government deliveries and a 1 percent increase in Commercial sales. GM’s fleet mix was 21 percent of total sales. Small business deliveries were up 4 percent. Chevrolet Retail Sales
      The Cruze, up 22 percent, the Volt, up 56 percent, and the Trax, up 40 percent, had their best-ever January retail sales. Total sales were also January records. Spark deliveries were up 40 percent. Bolt EVs, which were available in California and Oregon during the month, had the fastest days to turn in the industry at 7 days. The Tahoe, up 8 percent, and Suburban, up 11 percent, had their best January retail sales since 2008. The Equinox was up 4 percent. The Colorado was up 9 percent for its best January retail sales since 2005. Total sales were also the highest January since 2005. Sales of the Silverado HD pickup were up 32 percent for the truck’s best January retail sales since 2008. Total HD sales were also the best since 2008. Buick Retail Sales
      Crossover deliveries were up 20 percent, driven by higher Encore sales and the first-ever Envision. Average transaction prices were up 9 percent, four times better than the industry average growth. GMC Retail Sales
      Deliveries of the Acadia were up 15 percent. Sierra deliveries were up 2 percent, for the truck’s best retail January sales since 2002. Average transaction prices were up 7 percent, more than three times better than the industry average growth. Cadillac Retail Sales
      Cadillac sales were up more than 1 percent. Crossover deliveries were up 11 percent, on the strength of the new XT5. Total Escalade deliveries were up 10 percent, driven by 7 percent increase in Escalade ESV retail sales. Average transaction prices were the highest in the brand’s history at $55,300, up about $1,000 year over year. GM Momentum Continues to Grow
      In 2016, GM was the industry’s fastest-growing full-line automaker on a retail sales basis, and Chevrolet has been the fastest-growing full-line brand for two consecutive years on a retail basis. Chevrolet grew retail market share in 2015-2016 by almost one full percentage point, which translates to more than 120,000 incremental sales.
      “Our go-to-market strategy in 2017 is the same as 2016,” McNeil said. “We are focused on strengthening our brands, growing retail sales and share, reducing daily rental deliveries and maintaining our operating discipline.”
      GM is optimistic about the year ahead because the economy is strong and the company’s four brands are dramatically expanding their product offerings in fast-growing crossover segments.
      Industry sales are expected to remain at or near record levels, with higher GM retail sales and market share on a year-over-year basis. GM’s deliveries to daily rental companies are expected to decline as a percentage of total sales for the third year in a row. GM will continue to match production with customer demand. Previously announced plans to reduce passenger car production at plants in Lordstown, Ohio and Lansing, Michigan were implemented at the end of January. GM’s operating discipline will help drive continued improvements in brand health and resale values. During January, IHS Markit said GM had the highest overall loyalty to a manufacturer for the second year in a row. Also, Kelley Blue Book gave seven Chevrolet and GMC vehicles awards for outstanding resale value, more than any other manufacturer. Ten all-new or recently redesigned crossovers are expected to drive GM’s 2017 sales results, including two new compact models, which will compete in the industry’s largest segment. Crossover Launches by Brand
      Chevrolet will have the industry’s broadest and freshest lineup of utility vehicles behind the 238-mile range Bolt EV; the 2018 Equinox, which arrives in showrooms soon; and the all-new Traverse, which arrives this summer. At Buick, crossovers are expected to account for as much as 75 percent of retail deliveries, up from 66 percent in 2016, driven by the Encore, Envision and Enclave. GMC, which has the highest average transaction prices of any non-luxury brand, will launch the all-new 2018 Terrain in late summer. It will complement the redesigned Acadia, which went on sale in late summer 2016. Cadillac will benefit from a full year of production of the new XT5 crossover, which is now the second best-selling vehicle in its segment.
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