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Sixty8panther

Not sure how much more I can take...

40 posts in this topic

I have a love/hate relationship with the car sales business. Always have.

Still recent events make me seriously doubt I want to stay at my job for

longer than absolutely neccessary. As cool as it is to deal hands on with

brand new Cadillacs & Chevrolets the car biz can be so unrewarding.

55-70 hrs a week & for WHAT? The money is not there like it used to be.

Not sure but I might be moving on soon. Too bad really, when I started

working at this dealer 2 months ago I had every intention of staying for

at least one year, possibly two.

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Do you have a plan on what you'd like to go into next?

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Two words:

1. Union

2. Benefits

Try a high-end used dealership.

Did that already too... that's how I got to drive all those

luxury cars & high end exotics like the Mercedes SL600s

Anniversary Edition, Porsche 911 cabrios, a ton of lame

assed "Lexus" branded Toyotas & the oh-so unimpressive

Honda S2000.

The car bizz in general is not condusive for a family life.

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How mechanically inclined are you? Can you weld, paint or do body work. I could see you being like a kid in a candy store working in a restoration/customization shop kind of like Coddington or Foose but not nearly as high-profile. If not, try putting up with the dealership for a while, living life on the cheap, and go to one of those training schools where they teach you auto body. After you complete your training, make your move.

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Z/28:

You guys remember my stories of brake jobs, water pump replacement snafus

& all the crap I replaced/rebuilt/repaired in my Camaro. I replaced quite a few

large items over the years. The TH350 transmission, a rear end, fuel pumps of

both in tank & mechanical variety, I don't pay for someone else to work on my

car unless the job is too complicated to be in a Haynes/Chilltons manual.

...and yes that basic plan has been in the back of my head for a while.

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The business is definitely a lot tougher now than 10 years ago when I started. I have seen probably 50 or 60 salespeople come and go in that time period; 9 or 10 managers, too. I don't know how I would hang on now if I didn't have half my business from repeats and referrals.

Losing the Olds line put a dent in my portfolio, which I am still feeling as those Alero leases come up and the people flee.

However, having said that, two months is not long enough to get a feel for the business. My first year sucked and there were many times I wanted out. We had a used car manager who was a real a-hole in those days, but after he got let go, things improved.

It will get better. As you hit your stride and as managers come and go, eventually you will be your own captain and will pretty much be able to set your own hours and call your own shots, but you need to hang in there!

I rarely work more than a 6 hour day and take a lot of weekends off. The won trips and benefits can be worthwhile. (I am going to Vegas and LA in a couple weeks on the company dime.)

But like any career, you have to pay your dues in the beginning. If you believe in yourself (and the product) all else will fall into place.

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The low pay, long hours & lack of respect (along with other annoyances)

have pretty much made my moind up for me. As soon as I have a backup

plan I'm outta here. The last straw was getting transfered to the Import

division. I'm a loudmouth & let people know I'm a GM fan and that's why

I have only ever sold GM product, past few days a few people did not

show up at our Mitsubishi/Suzuki/Hyundai showroom and two salespeople

quit today so they want me to sell the imports.

Sooooo.... I do not know what the hell tha's all about. :blink:

The business is definitely a lot tougher now than 10 years ago when I started. I have seen probably 50 or 60 salespeople come and go in that time period; 9 or 10 managers, too. I don't know how I would hang on now if I didn't have half my business from repeats and referrals.

That's the ey right there....

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My brother used to work in auto sales in the '70s and '90s...Ford, VW, Mazda, Jeep, Pontiac.. I can't recall from talking with him, but how are people paid in auto sales--a base + some amount of commission on each sale?

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straight comission + volume bonus is the norm

Sly, that's why I got out of sales - single mom = steady paycheque. when i was a lease manager i made salary + comission, and now as a business manager i make the same but on a larger scale. I too, wouldn't be happy not selling a product I love.

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Yup... always that carrot on a string.

I hate working 70 hours a week & still wondering

if I will have enough to pay my bills. #$%& that.

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Yup... always that carrot on a string.

I hate working 70 hours a week & still wondering

if I will have enough to pay my bills. #$%& that.

I do feel for you sir. I cannot tell you how to run you affairs. It appears to me you need to find a steady paycheck office job. You have a family and they need you. You need stability. It is time you sharpen up your resume and your marketing skills and put yourself out there and sell yourself to earn a good wage to support your family. I think you are realizing it may be time to fold and get into another area. It is all about change and how well you can adapt to change. I do understand about selling something you do not agree with. So.. put yourself together, develop and plan and seek out new employment. You take the first step, and the door will open for you.

Edited by NINETY EIGHT REGENCY
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In sales, probably more than any other line of work, attitude is everything. If you are having a bad day, customers will sense that.

I liken selling cars to being single and hanging out in bars: you have to have the courage to keep asking and the strength to enjoy being turned down, but when the right person says 'yes,' the reward is well worth it. Truly, I worked it out, that if you use the same skills you (should have) learned while dating, you will succeed in sales.

For example, never, ever ask a question that you do not know the answer to, or cannot control that answer. Ask a girl/guy for a dance, or if you can buy her/him a drink - what will the probable response be? A 'conditioned,' NO. Same thing as asking a customer on the floor if you can help them. What will their probable response be? "No, thanks - just looking." Crash and burn in both cases. Whether trying to pick up someone in a bar or connect with a customer, you need to control the conversation and keep the goal in mind. The prospective date/buyer will sense the confidence and pick up on that.

If you are fed up and not liking your job and if the management is pissing you off, customers will sense that, too. No matter what, you have to keep your emotions in check. Ever go to a bar in a bad mood? Did you get laid? Did you go there at the end of a great day, with a bunch of your pals, and suddenly every chick in the room wants your number?

Sales can be very, very rewarding. I would hate to have a 'fixed' paycheck. And I will tell you something else, after a few years, your paycheck is fairly steady. Even a bad month is usually followed by two or three good ones.

Sounds like you are in a crappy dealership with irrelevant management. I wouldn't necessarily give up on car sales - just that dealership.

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In sales, probably more than any other line of work, attitude is everything. If you are having a bad day, customers will sense that.

I liken selling cars to being single and hanging out in bars: you have to have the courage to keep asking and the strength to enjoy being turned down, but when the right person says 'yes,' the reward is well worth it. Truly, I worked it out, that if you use the same skills you (should have) learned while dating, you will succeed in sales.

For example, never, ever ask a question that you do not know the answer to, or cannot control that answer. Ask a girl/guy for a dance, or if you can buy her/him a drink - what will the probable response be? A 'conditioned,' NO. Same thing as asking a customer on the floor if you can help them. What will their probable response be? "No, thanks - just looking." Crash and burn in both cases. Whether trying to pick up someone in a bar or connect with a customer, you need to control the conversation and keep the goal in mind. The prospective date/buyer will sense the confidence and pick up on that.

If you are fed up and not liking your job and if the management is pissing you off, customers will sense that, too. No matter what, you have to keep your emotions in check. Ever go to a bar in a bad mood? Did you get laid? Did you go there at the end of a great day, with a bunch of your pals, and suddenly every chick in the room wants your number?

Sales can be very, very rewarding. I would hate to have a 'fixed' paycheck. And I will tell you something else, after a few years, your paycheck is fairly steady. Even a bad month is usually followed by two or three good ones.

Sounds like you are in a crappy dealership with irrelevant management. I wouldn't necessarily give up on car sales - just that dealership.

LOL @ the comparisons, valid though they may be :lol:

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Working up to management is key in the world of automobile sales. The #1 salesman should be the 2nd highest paid person other than the owner, but it takes a unique individual, usually assholes.

Management, while commision based is far more stable, as you get to rely on each sales person, not just yourself.

I personally went the business office route, better hours better pay.

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Working up to management is key in the world of automobile sales. The #1 salesman should be the 2nd highest paid person other than the owner, but it takes a unique individual, usually assholes.

Management, while commision based is far more stable, as you get to rely on each sales person, not just yourself.

I personally went the business office route, better hours better pay.

:alcoholic:

We have a saying. Write this down: "Of all the Managers I have met, you are the most recent."

Sales slump: fire the managers. CSI tanks: fire the managers. Company needs to save some money: fire the expensive managers and replace them with cheaper ones. Oh, and the best of all: every time a manager walks in and tries to clean house, the top sales guys go behind his back to the GM or the dealer principle (often the same person) and bitch and complain until that Manager quits in frustration.

The only good thing about being a Manager, from my observation is that IF you are really good, you can land on your feet pretty quickly after being fired. The great thing about managers is that they are often powerless to make any real change, yet their very livelihood depends on it. Ever try walking into a situation where YOU are the 'new' manager but the 6 or 8 senior sales guys have been there 10 or more years and just run circles around you?

Ever watch the BBC sitcom "Yes, Minister?" You should.

Stick to sales, 68: get good at it and you can call your own shots. The GM would never dare let you go and the managers end up kissing YOUR ass. I've seen it happen time and time again.

BTW: Just for full disclosure, I have never had a manager's lips on my ass.

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Well that's the thing... I enjoy cars not car SALES.

I do very well with buying selling classic cars & beaters but I hate

today's car business when it comes to dealerships... I can admit

that I could be better at it but I simply do not care to constantly

play mindgames and "control" customers. I'm not into sales, what

I should be doing is starting my own business idea.

(classic car shipping company)

For now I'm going to try to get a job with good benefits, perhaps

something blue collar in a union. I'm not afraid of hard work but I

am sick of dealers, ALL dealers. I've worked at enough.

Perhaps I do not have a high enough tollerance for B.S. & abuse.

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If I were going to be selling cars, I'd want to be the sales manager, not the salesman. Perhaps you could try to get a better position somewhere else?

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Have you considered a classic or specialty car dealer? What about a restoration shop? Are there any hot-rod shops in your area? I would avoid trying to find a job as a mechanic since most shops don't like to hire people who aren't ASE certified, but with the supply of mechanics out there imploding I'm sure someone would be willing to bend the rules a little.

Yes, I'm exploring ALL my options.

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Blue Collar, High Pay, Great Benefits, Hurting Body, Awesome Retirement, Working 60+ hours, paid $60,000 to $70,000 per year kind of Union Job? Try UPS

The 1st few years of part-time are tough, but once you go driver you make great money. During that time you can still work at a Pot Lot or such. They will also pay for school, or you could go management. At this time we have ALOT of Supervisors & Drivers retiring (Baby Boomers), so now is the time to get in.

EDIT: YOUR BODY WILL HURT!! This is NOT easy work. They will work you harder than you have ever worked before. With that said no one out there has as good insurance or retirement plan (West Coast only). Pay is subpar when you start, but if you stick it out current full scale is $28.15 per hour. There are numerous opportunties for part-timers to pick up additional work at the larger Hubs.

Edited by Dsuupr
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Dsuupr:

Funny you say that. My second interview at UPS was this morning at 4:00am.

I live about 8 miles away from the largest UPS fascility east of the Mississippi

and the central hub for N.E. At about 9:00 (already at the dealership) I got a

phone call from HR saying I'm hired. I start at 3:45am on Tuesday the 18th.

I got recomendations from TWO different people and I was told it will be a lot

like boot camp... which is cool, I need to get in shape again. 20 hours a week

with full benefits for myself, Julie & the baby. Now we're getting somewhere!

Now I still need to find some other part time job to suplement my UPS income

but not work me too hard phisically... something that will amount to another

20 or 30 hours a week. That will still be less than the 60-70 I put in here.

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Oh... and what's a Pot Lot?

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I'm getting the the point where 68 is. I am in a position I am completely bored in and am beginning to resent being stuck in it. They pay a very large bonus ever year on February 15th. I was only eligible for 1/4 of the bonus last year, however, if I multiply last years bonus by 4, it is easily a large enough number to want to stay.

I'm on call this week which means I have a pager... which means I get a page every time some server somewhere gets a hangnail.

Did I mention they only get hangnails between the hours of 3am and 4am, when I'm in the shower, mowing the lawn, or in the middle of something... more personal?

Last night the pager was going off while I was trying to cook dinner because the server wasn't downloading files that weren't going to be looked at till the next morning anyway.

Resume was updated yesterday <both US and EU versions>. It's being sent out today.

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In any career worth keeping the AGREVATION has to be baced up by enough COMPENSATION.

Right now I'm getting very little of the later but plenty of the later.

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