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Guest YellowJacket894

Scratching The Itch

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I'm probably about to make two stupid moves before going into college, one of them being me buying a brand-new twenty-one thousand dollar Camaro. Well, chances are I'm going to make another stupid move on top of that. Meet the two cars that qualify for my second mistake.

1967 Chevrolet Camaro, 327 V8:

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1967 Pontiac Firebird, 350 V8:

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The cost of both cars are $4,500. Both cars are roughly in the same shape: mild amounts of rust, the floorboards rotting away to nothing (as you can see in the second-to-last pics in both sets), but I know the Camaro's 327 runs pretty well and could make for a better daily driver during restoration. The owner of the lot that has these two little diamonds in the rough (as well as the '56 Chevy shoebox coupe and the land yacht Bonneville you see in the background, as well as two Mustangs ['66 and a '68], two Chevelles [a '67 and a '71], a '66 Impala sedan, a Wildcat, and a classic Fifties-era Pontiac) told me that the Firebird will run as well as the Camaro.

But, I don't know. I'm torn between the two cars, and as soon as I get another job (ridiculous hour cuts at my current job are really f@#king me out of some decent cash) one of the two of them could wind up in my driveway. Now, I have some questions, but the two I want to ask you is what you would offer for either one of them and how much it would take to repair the floorboards (Ocn, are you reading?). I was looking in a recent Sport Truck magazine, and I'll probably just take which ever car I buy to MACCO for paint (get all of the premium packages and don't cut corners; it actually looked really well on the '89 S10 they let MACCO work on) if I can't get any of my friends to hook me up with a good paint job. The owner of the lot was also telling me there's a place in state that has F-Body reproduction parts for decent prices and I'm going to check that claim (he seems like an honest guy, so I don't doubt him, I've just never heard of the place he mentioned to me before).

As always, thanks guys. :thumbsup:

Edited by YellowJacket894
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Get both :P

I wish! Hell, I wish I could buy half of the whole damn lot (there's another Camaro inside of the garage at the lot that's not for sale that's way more solid than either of these two that I'd like to buy if I could). :P

Edited by YellowJacket894
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Stick with the Camaro... Imagine your driveway after you buy a 5G Camaro :yes:

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Stick with the Camaro... Imagine your driveway after you buy a 5G Camaro :yes:

I know. I keep seeing two black Camaros setting out in front of my future Northern Kentucky apartment, one from 1967, the other from 2009. God, does it look good. :drool:

I'm going to improve my financial situation and make the a plan I have in mind work. Maybe there's a way I can get the '67 paid off before I go to college and get the '09.

:scratchchin:

I hope everything works out. If it falls through, I'll work on a plan B or start saving for the LS1 conversion for the Sonoma.

Edited by YellowJacket894
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just looking at the cars im gunna say the Camaro will require less work... the firebird looks like it has a larger amount of rust... unless the pics of the Camaro hide the rust better...

BUT

if you know its a mistake... and you're dead set on a 2009 Camaro... then don't buy either... i know its tempting... i was in a similar position when i saw a 67 Camaro SS in decent shape (needed new paint and brake lines) for only 9k back when i still had my Monte... as much as i wanted that car, and especially for how good a deal it was... i knew that as a future college student i wouldnt have the time or the money to invest in such a project, nor to pay for the insurance etc... sometimes, and especially now as you get ready for college, you just need to realize whats more important, cut your losses and move on. Will it be hard? yes of course it will be... but in the long run, thats $4500 more dollars you have to spend on your education... and maybe someday later you can find a project car

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What's the deal with the little '56 Chevy 210 coupe next to the Camaro; you could make yourself a nice little hot rod out of that one. If that's not your thing, however, then what's your storage situation look like? If you could buy the Camaro OR the 'Bird, do you have a place you could store it where its condition wouldn't get any worse until you were ready for it? I agree with the people that say hold off on diving in and spending all your money on something like this, but at the same time, it wouldn't necessarily be bad to buy it and just stash it away until you had the proper time and energy or money to devote to it, or to chip away at it little by little so as to not spread yourself too thin. That's where I'm at with my '67 Eldorado: I had safe, indoor space for a car so I took advantage of a good situation, grabbed it, and am holding onto it till I can really go at it; until that time comes I've been slowly collecting parts for it so that I have some of it out of the way when the car finally gets its day.

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What's the deal with the little '56 Chevy 210 coupe next to the Camaro; you could make yourself a nice little hot rod out of that one.

It's not too much. But, as much as I appreciate the '56, it's just not what I really desire. It does need a good home, though.

If that's not your thing, however, then what's your storage situation look like? If you could buy the Camaro OR the 'Bird, do you have a place you could store it where its condition wouldn't get any worse until you were ready for it?

We're due to move again around the time I graduate from high school. A large storage building/workshop is a priority with my dad this time around, so chances are I'll have a place to store it. Until we move, I'll have it under a car cover. I'm not like the idiots who live down the road from the car lot I visited that are letting their really nice '72 LeMans rot away out in the elements because they are too lazy to put back on the car cover that blew off with the last bad summer storm which sits not more than a foot beside the damn car.

I agree with the people that say hold off on diving in and spending all your money on something like this, but at the same time, it wouldn't necessarily be bad to buy it and just stash it away until you had the proper time and energy or money to devote to it, or to chip away at it little by little so as to not spread yourself too thin. That's where I'm at with my '67 Eldorado: I had safe, indoor space for a car so I took advantage of a good situation, grabbed it, and am holding onto it till I can really go at it; until that time comes I've been slowly collecting parts for it so that I have some of it out of the way when the car finally gets its day.

That's the plan for the restoration I have: just do one repair/thing at a time. The first thing being the floorboards, followed by replacing the panels, followed by paint. Then it should be a decent car to drive around until I finish the resto'.

That being said, I am not going to pay $4500 for either car. No matter how uncommon they might be, they are not in the sort of condition that justifies the cost. I'm going to offer the guy $2300 and work my way up to my maximum offer of $3100. I know that sounds reasonable, probably a little more than I actually should be paying.

I know if I can get a better job, I can repay a loan from about $2300 to $3100 dollars no problem. I know my dad was paying about $50 bucks a month for a loan that was close to that range (it was financed for five years, yes, but I know of a way I can pay it off in about a year or year and a half). Granted, I won't have the luxury of dodging Uncle Sam and the IRS guys with my next job, but that's alright. It all works out with the plan I have in mind.

Seem pricey, but what do I know? I'd pass. :P

Read above. I'm definitely going to haggle here.

just looking at the cars im gunna say the Camaro will require less work... the firebird looks like it has a larger amount of rust... unless the pics of the Camaro hide the rust better...

You're right; in person, the Camaro looks like it's much worse off than the Firebird, but they're really about the same. I need to get the Camaro out of it's spot from behind the Bonneville and check for frame rust when I have everything sorted out, know that it will work out for sure, and go back for another look. Frame rust will be a deciding factor here.

BUT

if you know its a mistake... and you're dead set on a 2009 Camaro... then don't buy either... i know its tempting... i was in a similar position when i saw a 67 Camaro SS in decent shape (needed new paint and brake lines) for only 9k back when i still had my Monte... as much as i wanted that car, and especially for how good a deal it was... i knew that as a future college student i wouldnt have the time or the money to invest in such a project, nor to pay for the insurance etc... sometimes, and especially now as you get ready for college, you just need to realize whats more important, cut your losses and move on. Will it be hard? yes of course it will be... but in the long run, thats $4500 more dollars you have to spend on your education... and maybe someday later you can find a project car

Insurance won't be a worry in the start; I won't be driving it until it's in a healthy, solid condition. And I'll just be doing this in between work and school, getting it done ASAP is not my MO here. And it will return my investment the more I spend on it. My college future, like most everyone else's, will be financed with a loan, so ... I don't know. This is something I'm really going to have to think over before taking total, decisive action. (So that means putting the half of me that's always almost there on an indefinite pause. It's hard, haha.)

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Why are there no shots of the '50s Pontiac ????? :angry:

And I'd like to see more of the Bonne, too.

The first rule with vintage iron is: buy the best condition body you can afford. Unless it's hyper rare (ahem- not the case with F-Bodies), there are hundreds more to choose from in the same price range at any given moment. Believe me- bodywork sucks up the most money on a rusty car, not to mention time. It was by far the most over-budget aspect of my '59 Buick, and that wasn't nearly as rusty as these 2 are.

If it was me, I'd save the circa $3K for the '09, and hopefully by then, when you are more settled WRT storage & have more disposable income accumulated, go find yourself a clean '67-69 then.

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Honestly, either F-body would be a daunting project for a young man in college. Just off the top of my head without doing any research, I'd say the Camaro would be easier to find repro parts for, but the Firebird would be more desireable for me because "everyone" has a first-gen Camaro. The Firebird looks to have a deluxe interior, with the pedal trim and such, nice. I wonder if you can get the VIN and run it through PHS.

If you can buy either car for a low, low price and store it in a place at no cost to you where further deterioration will be slowed until you can work on restoring it properly, go for it. Most young guys though, I believe, might not have the patience to just buy a car and sock it away, protected for a few years until money catches up with desire so the end result will be something you want to keep forever.

If it were me, ideally, I'd buy the Firebird, then store it for a few years. In the meantime, I'd read every bit of information I could on its history (PHS should be able to help you with the original build information), and also proper restoration techniques... the end result will be something you'll be proud to own, keep and show off for a long, long time, but it won't happen overnight.

Putting a V8 in your Sonoma sounds like a fun project, but I predict that 3 months after it's done you'll be like "meh, why did I do this?" Anyway, good luck with whatever you decide.

Edited by ocnblu
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But, I don't know. I'm torn between the two cars, and as soon as I get another job (ridiculous hour cuts at my current job are really f@#king me out of some decent cash) one of the two of them could wind up in my driveway.

My personal opinion:

Be very careful about this. I went far beyond my means to get and retore both of my Camaros right out of high school and it really slowed the advancement of my education. I'm 25 and still in college largely because of my preference to spend my money on classic cars as opposed to a full class load. So just be careful! I'm not telling you to put off your purchase because I wouldn't change a thing, I love my cars too much. But you have to find a balance and be sure to have your priorities in order. Chances are, you'll never be finished with the project because there is always something that you want to add to the car. The restoration of my '73 has been 10 years long now (I am able to drive it though) How are you going to come up with the money? (If you don't mind me asking) If you have it in savings, then that's cool but if you're going to have to finance, that's not so cool because you'll have to take out a personal loan (Which means interest = rape) which is what I did to buy my '68.

Now, with all of the responsibility :bs: out of the way, if I were you I'd go with the Firebird. That's because the car is more rare and will become even more valuable if GM ever does phase out Pontiac. (god forbid) Then again, I'm pretty biased as I've ALWAYS wanted a first gen Firebird. They convey a certain machoism that the first gen Camaros just can't.

$4500 appears to be a pretty good deal by the pictures of the cars. they both seem to be pretty solid and it's an especially good deal if they run. Funny thing is, I can remember when $4500 would get you a car that was much further along in restoration; my, how times have changed. I don't think you'll have any trouble finding parts for either of the cars and last time I checked parts are pretty cheap (Compared to my second gen, parts or my first gen are cheap) Not to mention the cars are VERY simplistic and easy to restore.

Now, I have some questions, but the two I want to ask you is what you would offer for either one of them and how much it would take to repair the floorboards.
Floor pans are about $70.00 per side from where I source my parts (National Parts Depot) www.npdlink.com I recently had new front pans put in my '73 and it cost me about $300 in labor. Of course, I've done all of my resto work with this body shop and I know them on a personal level, so he might've given me a pretty good deal. Unless you do your own work, I'd advise you to find a good mechanic and body shop and stick with them. I do some of my own work, but not a lot simply because I don't have the shop to do it in. (My garage is so small that it can only be used or storage mostly.

I actually live about 7 miles from the National Parts Depot distribution center here in NC, so if you ever make a parts trip let me know. But I think Camaro Specialty is headquartered in Kentucky so you might be better off ordering from them. I will tell you this; normally it's cheaper to make a trip to the parts place and buy a lot of stuff at once as opposed to ordering stuff piece by piece and paying shipping.

(Ocn, are you reading?). I was looking in a recent Sport Truck magazine, and I'll probably just take which ever car I buy to MACCO for paint (get all of the premium packages and don't cut corners; it actually looked really well on the '89 S10 they let MACCO work on) if I can't get any of my friends to hook me up with a good paint job. The owner of the lot was also telling me there's a place in state that has F-Body reproduction parts for decent prices and I'm going to check that claim (he seems like an honest guy, so I don't doubt him, I've just never heard of the place he mentioned to me before).

I personally wouldn't deal with Maaco. I think it's better to find a mom 'n pops place where the guy will sweat the details a bit more than a chain.

I'll look for Camaro Specialty's website. The best 'big' parts sources are probably NPD or YearOne though. YearOne has a lot of NOS and concours parts if you want to go the $$$ route.

Edited by FUTURE_OF_GM
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just looking at the cars im gunna say the Camaro will require less work... the firebird looks like it has a larger amount of rust... unless the pics of the Camaro hide the rust better...

BUT

if you know its a mistake... and you're dead set on a 2009 Camaro... then don't buy either... i know its tempting... i was in a similar position when i saw a 67 Camaro SS in decent shape (needed new paint and brake lines) for only 9k back when i still had my Monte... as much as i wanted that car, and especially for how good a deal it was... i knew that as a future college student i wouldnt have the time or the money to invest in such a project, nor to pay for the insurance etc... sometimes, and especially now as you get ready for college, you just need to realize whats more important, cut your losses and move on. Will it be hard? yes of course it will be... but in the long run, thats $4500 more dollars you have to spend on your education... and maybe someday later you can find a project car

As far as insurance, you can go the classic car insurance route.

But there are a few stipulations. 1) The car has to be in a locking garage 2) You have to provide proof that said car is not your daily transportation. 3) SOME companies require that you are 21 and older. 4) The car has to be insured for an agreed upon value, which means you have to pay to get the car appraised. 5) SOME companies have mileage limits.

I will probably go this route sometime this year. When I priced it a few years ago, I could insure each of my cars for $15,000 a piece and the premium was only $111 each year. Not a bad deal considering that was "no questions asked" which means if the car is totaled in any way, they mail you a check for the agreed upon value. So, if for instance, one of my cars burns to the ground, I would get a check for $15,000. (Man, I hope that never happens.)

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When I read your first post, I got the impression that you were saying $4,500 for the pair. That would be a deal I'd jump on. Otherwise, it would be time to negotiate vigorously.

Resto parts for these cars are inexpensive generally, and easy to come by. The detail parts for the Firebird would be the bigger challenge.

That lot is chock full of temptation!

and potential.

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4500 seems awfully high given how poor the condition the cars are in...these look more like $500 parts cars to me. I guess the prices on original F-bodies have really gone up over the years..

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4500 seems awfully high given how poor the condition the cars are in...these look more like $500 parts cars to me. I guess the prices on original F-bodies have really gone up over the years..

That would be a major understatement.

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It stinks how decent affordable project cars are hard to come by these days

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Wow, cool site wildman.
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Why are there no shots of the '50s Pontiac ????? :angry:

And I'd like to see more of the Bonne, too.

I was too lazy to walk to the other end of the lot in twenty degree weather. :smilewide:

The Bonne is actually in decent shape, so is the '54 Arrowhead. If you want me to, I'll get some pics of these cars next time I go to that lot.

The first rule with vintage iron is: buy the best condition body you can afford. Unless it's hyper rare (ahem- not the case with F-Bodies), there are hundreds more to choose from in the same price range at any given moment. Believe me- bodywork sucks up the most money on a rusty car, not to mention time. It was by far the most over-budget aspect of my '59 Buick, and that wasn't nearly as rusty as these 2 are.

Yeah, the F-Body isn't a rare car, but it's actually hard for me to find a decent one in the sub-five thousand dollar range somewhere local. I'm going to rule out eBay motors with this one (except to see what a similar car might be going for) as I really don't have any extra breathing room in my budget here to get it from only God knows where to Kentucky. Auto Trader isn't much help either as the magazine have way too many out of state listings (NY, etc.).

If it was me, I'd save the circa $3K for the '09, and hopefully by then, when you are more settled WRT storage & have more disposable income accumulated, go find yourself a clean '67-69 then.

That's what I sort of want to do, but I think about the fact that, as with any classic car, they do get harder and harder to find and more expensive as the years go on. Something tells me to just get the car now and work on it during the summer when I'm out of school and when money isn't too tight.

My personal opinion:

Be very careful about this. I went far beyond my means to get and retore both of my Camaros right out of high school and it really slowed the advancement of my education. I'm 25 and still in college largely because of my preference to spend my money on classic cars as opposed to a full class load. So just be careful! I'm not telling you to put off your purchase because I wouldn't change a thing, I love my cars too much. But you have to find a balance and be sure to have your priorities in order. Chances are, you'll never be finished with the project because there is always something that you want to add to the car. The restoration of my '73 has been 10 years long now (I am able to drive it though) How are you going to come up with the money? (If you don't mind me asking) If you have it in savings, then that's cool but if you're going to have to finance, that's not so cool because you'll have to take out a personal loan (Which means interest = rape) which is what I did to buy my '68.

The way I was going to pay for the car was to get a better job with increased earnings/wages (working full-time on one weekend day, etc.). Then, once I had that squared away, check around into a loan with a decent interest rate and make payments until I get a tax return, which the whole return would be put towards paying off the loan. I figure that a good portion of it should be payed off by doing it that way, and I won't owe so much on it around the time I start looking for a Chevrolet dealer that won't do any sort of mark-up on a new Camaro and start sending in college applications to the University of Cincinnati School of Design, Cleveland Institute of Art, etc. (I hope I can qualify for a partial scholarship to help in all of this mess, but, I've had some personal issues in the past that have ultimately distracted me from school and had a negative effect on my grades as a result.)

Now, with all of the responsibility :bs: out of the way, if I were you I'd go with the Firebird. That's because the car is more rare and will become even more valuable if GM ever does phase out Pontiac. (god forbid) Then again, I'm pretty biased as I've ALWAYS wanted a first gen Firebird. They convey a certain machoism that the first gen Camaros just can't.

I thought of that potential you mention that the Firebird possesses. Besides the obvious that there probably won't be another Firebird ever made again, there is also the possibility of Pontiac fading away like Oldsmobile (as with any division from the B-P-G group).

$4500 appears to be a pretty good deal by the pictures of the cars. they both seem to be pretty solid and it's an especially good deal if they run. Funny thing is, I can remember when $4500 would get you a car that was much further along in restoration; my, how times have changed.

I still want to pay a price lower that than. I just don't feel either one of them are worth that much money. I think the price will be what ultimately makes or breaks this purchase should it go through all the way.

It's not really pertinent to the conversation, but I know that for a while that the '67 Camaro didn't run. About a year ago (yes, that car has been there that long; so has the Firebird) I was looking at a '69 Firebird with a 400 V8 at that lot. It was sitting in the garage alongside the '67, it had just arrived there from Wisconsin where it previously sat in a barn for only god knows how long. The guy who owns the lot told us that, not more than fifteen minutes before we showed up, he tried starting the engine a few times to no progress (would stutter and die). Then, after a few twists of the key, it finally started up ... and spat up a dead mouse out of the exhaust pipe. I remember seeing the charred carcass about two feet from behind the car near the garage door.

I don't think you'll have any trouble finding parts for either of the cars and last time I checked parts are pretty cheap (Compared to my second gen, parts or my first gen are cheap) Not to mention the cars are VERY simplistic and easy to restore.

Floor pans are about $70.00 per side from where I source my parts (National Parts Depot) www.npdlink.com I recently had new front pans put in my '73 and it cost me about $300 in labor. Of course, I've done all of my resto work with this body shop and I know them on a personal level, so he might've given me a pretty good deal. Unless you do your own work, I'd advise you to find a good mechanic and body shop and stick with them. I do some of my own work, but not a lot simply because I don't have the shop to do it in. (My garage is so small that it can only be used or storage mostly.

That's not too bad for replacing the floor pans, which would be the first thing done no matter which car I decide to go with. I'm going to be taking some more serious mechanics courses, as well as a welding class soon, so I know the knowledge I pick up there will help out greatly in the process.

I actually live about 7 miles from the National Parts Depot distribution center here in NC, so if you ever make a parts trip let me know. But I think Camaro Specialty is headquartered in Kentucky so you might be better off ordering from them. I will tell you this; normally it's cheaper to make a trip to the parts place and buy a lot of stuff at once as opposed to ordering stuff piece by piece and paying shipping.

Camaro Specialty was the place that the owner of the lot mentioned to me when I took a look at the two '67s. It's based in Lexington, which isn't but a short drive up the road from me. He told me that new quarter panels (can't remember if they were front or rear) would set me back $119 a piece. Not too bad considering other places would charge as much after shipping.

I personally wouldn't deal with Maaco. I think it's better to find a mom 'n pops place where the guy will sweat the details a bit more than a chain.

Macco would be the way I would go if I couldn't find anyone who could get me a decent price on a paint job. (I have a friend whose grandfather does bodywork and paint for a living, so this would obviously be my first place to look before going elsewhere.) And then I wouldn't pinch pennies and buy everything they offered to make sure it was done correctly.

I'll look for Camaro Specialty's website. The best 'big' parts sources are probably NPD or YearOne though. YearOne has a lot of NOS and concours parts if you want to go the $$$ route.

I'll be doing this on a considerately tight budget, so the $$$ route may be avoided. :smilewide:

Edited by YellowJacket894
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As far as insurance, you can go the classic car insurance route.

But there are a few stipulations. 1) The car has to be in a locking garage 2) You have to provide proof that said car is not your daily transportation. 3) SOME companies require that you are 21 and older. 4) The car has to be insured for an agreed upon value, which means you have to pay to get the car appraised. 5) SOME companies have mileage limits.

I will probably go this route sometime this year. When I priced it a few years ago, I could insure each of my cars for $15,000 a piece and the premium was only $111 each year. Not a bad deal considering that was "no questions asked" which means if the car is totaled in any way, they mail you a check for the agreed upon value. So, if for instance, one of my cars burns to the ground, I would get a check for $15,000. (Man, I hope that never happens.)

I'm not going to be driving the car at all until the floor pans are replaced with new metal, so I don't really think insurance will be needed for a while.

When I read your first post, I got the impression that you were saying $4,500 for the pair. That would be a deal I'd jump on. Otherwise, it would be time to negotiate vigorously.

And negotiate I will.

Resto parts for these cars are inexpensive generally, and easy to come by. The detail parts for the Firebird would be the bigger challenge.

I like a challenge ... :scratchchin:

That lot is chock full of temptation!

and potential.

I know. I'm lucky to live around such interesting places: a junk yard, a used car lot full of classic cars ... I'm actually going to hate moving from here when I go to Ohio for college.

Here's the site of a guy who restored a Firebird if it's any help: http://www.together.net/~manycj/firebird/firebird1.htm

Thanks for the link, Joe! I've bookmarked this for future reading. :)

And, in response to your earlier post, you'd better believe I'm going to go over each of them like ants on a picnic. Whichever car is in better shape, goes home with me, if everything looks like it will work out in the end.

Honestly, either F-body would be a daunting project for a young man in college. Just off the top of my head without doing any research, I'd say the Camaro would be easier to find repro parts for, but the Firebird would be more desireable for me because "everyone" has a first-gen Camaro. The Firebird looks to have a deluxe interior, with the pedal trim and such, nice. I wonder if you can get the VIN and run it through PHS.

I'm contemplating going back to the lot to retreive both VINs for the '67s this Wednesday to see if they are matching numbers cars, for one. (For haggling.)

If you can buy either car for a low, low price and store it in a place at no cost to you where further deterioration will be slowed until you can work on restoring it properly, go for it. Most young guys though, I believe, might not have the patience to just buy a car and sock it away, protected for a few years until money catches up with desire so the end result will be something you want to keep forever.

In this case, I have the patentience to wait however long I need to. This isn't just a car, this is something I really do plan on keeping for the rest of my life, and, as much as I hate to say it, an investment as well.

If it were me, ideally, I'd buy the Firebird, then store it for a few years. In the meantime, I'd read every bit of information I could on its history (PHS should be able to help you with the original build information), and also proper restoration techniques... the end result will be something you'll be proud to own, keep and show off for a long, long time, but it won't happen overnight.

This would definitely be the way I would go about handling the project. But this car won't just be a show piece: I'll actually be driving it quite often. It'll be babied, but it sure as hell won't be a trailer queen.

Putting a V8 in your Sonoma sounds like a fun project, but I predict that 3 months after it's done you'll be like "meh, why did I do this?" Anyway, good luck with whatever you decide.

Yeah, I'm afraid I might just get bored with the Sonoma after the swap (should've got a truck with the 4.3 so I wouldn't be tempted with the thought of doing a conversion in the first place). I also want my Sonoma to be an attractive daily driver, but, ah, I guess a big honkin' V8 for my truck might not be the best place to invest my money right now.

And thanks, blu. :)

Edited by YellowJacket894
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Wow, YJ...what a decision to make, eh?

I'd go with the Camaro ... but, it sure would be nice to claim both ;).

Good luck with whatever you decide to do....

Cort:34swm."Mr Monte Carlo.Mr Road Trip".pig valve&pacemaker

WRMNshowcase.legos.HO.models.MCs.RTs.CHD = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort

"The rhythm of the rails is all they feel" ... Steve Goodman ... 'City Of New Orleans'

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MAACO sucks, they don't even use real paint.
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hey YJ i know this is pretty far off topic but... where in Ohio are you goin for college?

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hey YJ i know this is pretty far off topic but... where in Ohio are you goin for college?

University of Cincinatti School of Design. And if not there, The Cleveland Insitute of Art or the College For Creative Studies (Chris Pauwels/crispey2k attends this college).

I think it's obvious what field I'm going into and who I plan to be working for. :AH-HA_wink:

Edited by YellowJacket894
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