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Satty

Holy Overpriced!

35 posts in this topic

That's not that bad....

Keep in mind, they are good on gas, and anything that is good on gas is overpriced right now...

Heck, I saw a 89 Escort for 2000 and a 91 Civic with 185k for 3000.....

It would be cool as a collecter's car though. :thumbsup:

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Funny thing is that they are usually thought of as bad cars that the car mags hated, but I have an old Motor Trend from 83 and they liked the Cimarron a lot. Unfortunately it looked almost identical to a Cavalier

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>>"Funny thing is that they are usually thought of as bad cars that the car mags hated, but I have an old Motor Trend from 83 and they liked the Cimarron a lot."<<

Car & Driver LOVED it- they borderline gushed. Once it became popular to bash it, they did a 180.

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I wouldn't mind having that as a collector car.

:yes:

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I have to say- I remember the D'Oro package at the end of production, which was a black car with a gold grille/trim- they really didn't look bad at all, but I've never seen one outside of pics- must've been very rare. google/altavista doesn't return any pics; tho I have a few in my files.

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I have to say- I remember the D'Oro package at the end of production, which was a black car with a gold grille/trim- they really didn't look bad at all, but I've never seen one outside of pics- must've been very rare. google/altavista doesn't return any pics; tho I have a few in my files.

I don't think I've ever seen one of those....

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Only way I'd pay anything over $100 for one of those piles is if it were one of the very few that got out the door with a five speed. A few months back a local automobile museum had one such equipped for sale in their lot of cars that were donated by members that had 80 something thousand on it and just needed a brake line (supposedly), and for short money, too. I considered it for half a second. But I'll stick with the REAL Cadillacs I've been buying all along.

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I wouldn't mind having that as a collector car.

We can laugh at Cadillac's feeble attempt at replying to high gas prices, but what goes around, comes around and suddenly we are seeing historically high gas prices again. If I was looking for a daily driver that was good on gas, this car would be a bargain and a half.

Of course Cadillac could have done more with the original J-body, but Ford didn't do much better with the Versailles (a warmed over Monarch) and pitted against the crappy LeBarons, Camries and others of the day, the Cimarron is not really any worse than many others.

The early 80s was a ghastly period. I know. I lived it.

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To be fair, the Versailles was more of a response to the 1975 Seville than it was to the Cimerron.

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You guys crask me up

"collector car" Pleeeeeeeeez.

Nothing against the Cimarron but how about we

hold our selves to a higher standard than that?

If this is a "Collector Car" than you guys must

consider the 1984 Chevy Type-10 Cavalier Hatch

to be a "sports car" and the 1987 ThunderTurd

SuperCoupe with it's 215 horsepower Ford-tastic

V6 supercharged motor to be a balls-to-the-wall

EXOTIC car.

A collector car from the 1980s?

87 Buick T-type/GN/GNX

89 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

86 Pontiac Grand Prix 2+2

85? Mercury Capri Turbo

88? Camaro Z28 covertible

a few of those funny FWD-turbo Shelby Mopars

An 80-85 Bustleback Seville with the V8-6-4 or diesel

power is more of a collectors car than any Cimarron

will ever be. Unless you think the 1974 Ford Maverick

Grabber is a fire breathing muscle car.

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You guys crask me up

"collector car" Pleeeeeeeeez.

Nothing against the Cimarron but how about we

hold our selves to a higher standard than that?

If this is a "Collector Car" than you guys must

consider the 1984 Chevy Type-10 Cavalier Hatch

to be a "sports car" and the 1987 ThunderTurd

SuperCoupe with it's 215 horsepower Ford-tastic

V6 supercharged motor to be a balls-to-the-wall

EXOTIC car.

A collector car from the 1980s?

87 Buick T-type/GN/GNX

89 Pontiac Turbo Trans Am

86 Pontiac Grand Prix 2+2

85? Mercury Capri Turbo

88? Camaro Z28 covertible

a few of those funny FWD-turbo Shelby Mopars

An 80-85 Bustleback Seville with the V8-6-4 or diesel

power is more of a collectors car than any Cimarron

will ever be. Unless you think the 1974 Ford Maverick

Grabber is a fire breathing muscle car.

Difference is that everyone's idea of a car to collect is different.......I know of a person who just adores his 1982 Ford Escort Wagon. I guess part of the reason for that was that his first car was an escort....

Everyone is different.

Since my first car was a J body, I wouldn't mind a 85-87 hatchback Z24....

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Difference is that everyone's idea of a car to collect is different.......

Doesn't mean that everybody's idea is right, or will ever be right.

The term "collector car" implies that it will have a value in the future beyond that of simply a cheap used car. A vehicle that has even a tiny margin of restorability. Something that has a widespread appeal but not everybody can have, making it a case of supply and demand. Something that will be sought after by people looking for a vehicle to be an investment just as much as they want it to be a toy. A tarted-up Cadillac Cavalier will never be anything more unless it's one of those rare examples that has ridiculously low miles on it and has survived in factory-fresh condition; nobody will ever ground-up restore one. They would be retarded to; the only way I would ever see it happening is if it belonged to a loved one or had some other sort of irreplaceable sentimental value to its owner, at which point the car's real value would be out the window for those incredibly few special cases. They have ZERO margin of restorability and NEVER will, because their restoration costs will ALWAYS far eclipse the purchase price of a mint example.

Vehicles made in the 80's and beyond largely have zero substance and zero style, and were not even built with the types of materials that are conducive to saving (plastics that turn to dust if you look at them the wrong way), and thus aren't at all and won't be at all unless they are the aforementioned ultra low-miles examples, something that has a good aftermarket because their popularity never waned (G-bodies, F-bodies, fox body Mustangs, etc.), something that was exclusive and low-production and therefore "collectible" from the moment it rolled off the assembly line (Grand Nationals, Corvettes, etc.), something whose parts are continuously hoarded by a small but dedicated and well-connected group of hardcore enthusiasts, or any combination of those.

Nobody that remembers cars from the malaise era and beyond will yearn for the cars of their childhood save for a select few examples (as mentioned before) because they all suck. Every single one of them. Do you honestly think for even half a second anybody will EVER have a tear come to their eye and pine away for JUST ONE MORE RIDE in a f@#king ugly ballsless plastic-laden front wheel drive Lumina Z34 or Escort coupe like their moms had in the same way that men our fathers age yearn for one more ride in a fire-breathing four-speed big block Super Sport Chevelle or Boss Mustang just like the one their friend or cousin or older brother brought home right before they shipped out to Vietnam?

Sorry, but it ain't like it used to be, plain and simple. All of those who think the mundane &#036;h&#33;boxes currently polluting the roads are "collectible" need to seriously put things into perspective. NOBODY, and I mean NOBODY will ever get rich by sitting on a warehouse full of J-bodies and Taurus SHO's in the way that people have by hanging onto pre-war Packards, fat-fendered Fords, big-finned Cadillac convertibles, big block Mopars, and Corvette Stingrays. The golden age of automobiles sadly ended long ago, and anybody who says different is lying to themselves.

Edited by XP715
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Th 87 T-bird was a Turbo-4 with up to 190 HP. I think the auto was around 150 hp. The supercharged T-bird came out in 89

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>>"I don't think I've ever seen one of those.... "<<

This is an '83, first yr for the package (paint/trim, wheels/tires, suspension, injected 2.0L, 5-spd, more standard & optional equipment). Cimarron was the #1 import conquest vehicle in '82- nearly 40% would've bought foreign otherwise.

1983D-Oro.jpg

I agree wholeheartedly with XP-715's post above; this generation has precious few future collectibles, and the Cimarron is NOT one of them, and you'd never get me to even consider this for a millisecond, but among small 4-banger '80s cars, this presents itself easily as well as most others.

Edited by balthazar
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Well, that's the point: if I were to buy an 'old' car, it would be one that I like. I wouldn't give a damn if it went up or down in value. That's why I prefer the late '60s tanks, like the Mopar 300s, the big Dodges, etc. I never liked the Chargers, Challengers, Cudas, etc. when I was a kid, why would I want one now?

The trouble with 'collectible' cars, is that they often make awful drivers. I drove a '57 T-bird not too long ago. Yech. When I seek out 'old' cars on E-Bay, etc., I first look to see if the car has power windows, a/c, etc., which is why very few vehicles before the mid-60s interest me: those toys were very, very rare. I may desire to tour around in an old 'classic,' but I sure as hell am not going to give up my amenities either! Living without cupholders would be insufferable enough!

As I worked for a Cadillac dealer in '81/'82, I remember the Cimarron well. What I liked about that car then was the fact that they were loaded. So, if I was looking for a cheap, economical daily driver for a couple grand, I doubt the Cimarron could be beat. Seriously. Where else would you get a car with power windows, locks, leather, a/c and 30 mpg for a couple grand?

It certainly would be better than a Datsun 210 that I rented in the summer of '82 that couldn't even pass a dump truck on a hill!

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Well, that's the point: if I were to buy an 'old' car, it would be one that I like. I wouldn't give a damn if it went up or down in value. That's why I prefer the late '60s tanks, like the Mopar 300s, the big Dodges, etc. I never liked the Chargers, Challengers, Cudas, etc. when I was a kid, why would I want one now?

:yes:

QFT

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Well, that's the point: if I were to buy an 'old' car, it would be one that I like. I wouldn't give a damn if it went up or down in value. That's why I prefer the late '60s tanks, like the Mopar 300s, the big Dodges, etc. I never liked the Chargers, Challengers, Cudas, etc. when I was a kid, why would I want one now?

You're absolutely right. People should always always ALWAYS buy what they like, above all else. But we're not talking about what people like. People said they wanted to buy this POS Cimarron not because they liked it, but to have as a "collector car," meaning for its perceived value on the open market. When people toss out the phrase "collector car," they are not just simply buying what they like: they are looking at said automobile as an investment for themselves just as much if not more as they are looking at it as a source of enjoyment for themselves. They buy it with the intention of using it carefully and sparingly, and selling it when the market swings in their favor to do so in order to turn a profit. So if one is looking to buy something as a "collector car," they should seriously evaluate its actual collectibility before doing so.

I know this concept is hard for some people on here to wrap their heads around, but some vehicles are rare simply because they sucked and nobody wanted them. That's why they are currently worthless and will continue to be worthless any way you slice it. They are not just simply underappreciated by those not "in the know," they will never become not underappreciated, you have not stumbled upon a great secret that the rest of the automotive world has yet to uncover, and you are not smart or ahead of the curve for wanting to buy one. You're just an idiot who can't look at something for what it is. Rare does not automatically equal valuable now or in the future. Face it. Every piece of &#036;h&#33; "special edition" that rolled off an assembly line in the 80's and beyond with an emblem or sticker or a weird set of foglights and fifty extra pounds of &#036;h&#33;ty plastic ground effects that was different from the normal cars for the sole purpose of boning somebody for an extra thousand bucks at the dealership when new will be worth no more than their equally worthless normal counterparts, because that's all they are: the normal car with an extra piece of crap glued to it. Remove said piece of crap from one car, glue it to an identical normal example, and suddenly, like magic, you cannot tell which was which. People fail to see the difference between legitimately special older vehicles and "special" newer vehicles. Believe it or not, the legitimate added value of a "performance package" one could purchase for a car in the 60's that consisted of things like special suspension, brakes, wheels and tires, funky fuel/air induction setups, and big nasty rat motors that would snap your f@#king neck DOES NOT and WILL NOT EVER EQUAL a "performance package" one could purchase in the late 80's and beyond that consisted of such RACE-INSPIRED FEATURES (!) like headrest embroidery, a different sticker for your trunk lid, and a retarded-looking exhaust tip. Be serious. Once again, a tarted-up Cadillac Cavalier will never be anything more unless it's still got the plastic on the seats and a certificate of origin in an envelope in the glovebox. If anybody honestly believes that a &#036;h&#33;box J-body with a Cadillac crest glued to it will ever be "collectible" and is looking into one as such, then I know where you can get a slammin' deal on some oceanfront property in Kansas.

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I'd rock it. Though not for that much. Or in that color.

I never understood collecting things for their "value" though. If it's something you'd like to keep, what's it matter what the value will be in the future? And if it's something you'd want to sell in the future, what's the reason for buying it other than that? Maybe I'm jsut overly sentimental.

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I'd rock it. Though not for that much. Or in that color.

I never understood collecting things for their "value" though. If it's something you'd like to keep, what's it matter what the value will be in the future? And if it's something you'd want to sell in the future, what's the reason for buying it other than that? Maybe I'm jsut overly sentimental.

well then if you ever inherit an ugly 1930s Duesenberg or even some cheesy Lasalle

I'll gladly trade you straight up for ANY fwd, V6 powered 1980s GM car that you

would consider your favorte. ;)

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I'd rock it. Though not for that much. Or in that color.

I never understood collecting things for their "value" though. If it's something you'd like to keep, what's it matter what the value will be in the future? And if it's something you'd want to sell in the future, what's the reason for buying it other than that? Maybe I'm jsut overly sentimental.

Silver or black would be nice....

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well then if you ever inherit an ugly 1930s Duesenberg or even some cheesy Lasalle

I'll gladly trade you straight up for ANY fwd, V6 powered 1980s GM car that you

would consider your favorte. ;)

Again, if I had unique cars like those, why would I want to part with them?

When I was a little kid we had a light blue Beetle, a Triumph TR6 and an MG TD. I used to sit in them and pretend I was driving them and dream of how much fun they'd be when they were roadworthy again. We never had time to restore them eventually we had to sell the Beetle and Triumph for scrap and I was heartbroken. But even if someday we restore it, why should I care how much it's worth if I won't want to sell it?

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