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Pre-Tuned or Modified: Which Is Better?

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stock-vs-modified1.jpg?w=648

 

Pre-Tuned or Stock. This week we’re asking the question: Which do you prefer? A pre-tuned ride or a stock vehicle that you can tune and modify yourself? My money is on the latter but I’ve been surprised before. Take the #SoundOff survey now!

 

Want to see last week's results? See the post here.

Edited by Rvinyl.com

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I'm not interested in pre-tuned vehicles. They're typically way overpriced, and you're getting a brand new car that's been taken apart and put back together already, not to mention the reduced reliability. As I've done with my own car, I want to drive it for a while bone stock and decide what deficiencies the car has and correct them to my liking. That, to me, is the essence of being an enthusiast.

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I'm not interested in pre-tuned vehicles. They're typically way overpriced, and you're getting a brand new car that's been taken apart and put back together already, not to mention the reduced reliability. As I've done with my own car, I want to drive it for a while bone stock and decide what deficiencies the car has and correct them to my liking. That, to me, is the essence of being an enthusiast.

 

That was my suspicion when I made the poll and it seems to be the case so far that most people responding have felt the same. Still, someone has chosen the pre-tuned option so there must be people out there who just like the looks without the work...

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Well, both of the cars pictured are disgusting and wastes of a fantastic car.

 

But to answer the question, generally speaking- stock. That way I can build it the way I want it, and I have more piece of mind it hasn't been ragged on.

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It depends who the tuner builder is and what that tuner company has done and how that tuner has styled the car....however...more often than not...the pre-tuned car is waaaaaay over done. 

 

SLP is one of those tuners (can we call SLP a tuner company?) that had Pontiac still existed...Id prefer to buy a ride stock from Pontiac then ship it to SLP for their modding and tuning.  I dont remember if their Firehawk Firebirds and G8s were sold directly from SLP or you had to ship them your ride...

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It depends who the tuner builder is and what that tuner company has done and how that tuner has styled the car....however...more often than not...the pre-tuned car is waaaaaay over done. 

 

SLP is one of those tuners (can we call SLP a tuner company?) that had Pontiac still existed...Id prefer to buy a ride stock from Pontiac then ship it to SLP for their modding and tuning.  I dont remember if their Firehawk Firebirds and G8s were sold directly from SLP or you had to ship them your ride...

 

Ahhh, Pontiac. I've never heard of SLP before. Are they still in business?

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It depends who the tuner builder is and what that tuner company has done and how that tuner has styled the car....however...more often than not...the pre-tuned car is waaaaaay over done. 

 

SLP is one of those tuners (can we call SLP a tuner company?) that had Pontiac still existed...Id prefer to buy a ride stock from Pontiac then ship it to SLP for their modding and tuning.  I dont remember if their Firehawk Firebirds and G8s were sold directly from SLP or you had to ship them your ride...

 

Ahhh, Pontiac. I've never heard of SLP before. Are they still in business?

 

http://www.slponline.com/

 

I'm with the majority, and for the same reasons. I'd prefer a stock car or my flavor, and do things that I like and/or find necessary. Most tuners will do something, whether small or big, that I'm not a fan of and the price paid for the tuner package is usually outrageous - Example: Shelby Super Snake. For the most part I think it's a great car, but the hood looks attrocious to me. And if I'm spending 50k or so on the package I don't want ANY part to not be of my liking. Especially a hood that probably costs a couple grand.

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I love my rides, but love tuned performance rides. Nothing wrong with an OEM Tuned ride over a basic ride but in reviewing this I believe you are talking about 3rd party tuners?

 

Count me as one who would buy a tuned ride............... preferably from the OEM performance division.

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I love my rides, but love tuned performance rides. Nothing wrong with an OEM Tuned ride over a basic ride but in reviewing this I believe you are talking about 3rd party tuners?

 

Count me as one who would buy a tuned ride............... preferably from the OEM performance division.

 

Alright, it's good to see that they're actually two sides to this story. I meant to pose the question of whether you would want a factory tuned or a third-party tuned ride but I see there are more interesting permutations of this question than I'd imagined. 

 

 

It depends who the tuner builder is and what that tuner company has done and how that tuner has styled the car....however...more often than not...the pre-tuned car is waaaaaay over done. 

 

SLP is one of those tuners (can we call SLP a tuner company?) that had Pontiac still existed...Id prefer to buy a ride stock from Pontiac then ship it to SLP for their modding and tuning.  I dont remember if their Firehawk Firebirds and G8s were sold directly from SLP or you had to ship them your ride...

 

Ahhh, Pontiac. I've never heard of SLP before. Are they still in business?

 

http://www.slponline.com/

 

I'm with the majority, and for the same reasons. I'd prefer a stock car or my flavor, and do things that I like and/or find necessary. Most tuners will do something, whether small or big, that I'm not a fan of and the price paid for the tuner package is usually outrageous - Example: Shelby Super Snake. For the most part I think it's a great car, but the hood looks attrocious to me. And if I'm spending 50k or so on the package I don't want ANY part to not be of my liking. Especially a hood that probably costs a couple grand.

 

 

 

Thanks!

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Good point actually, Originally when I read this I thought of just buying a used modified car over a stock car. Then I read and it seemed more like a Shelby America/Hennessey kind of tuner that you meant. Which were you thinking of? Honestly, it won't change my answer but I'm just curious.

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I think you really need to think of it in terms of 3rds!

 

OEM Factory original Mustang or Camero

OEM Performance Tuned Mustang or Camero

3rd party Tuned Mustang or Camero such as Shelby or Hennessey.

 

Thinking that way which way would you go?

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The 2nd generation Firehawk

Firehawk2.jpg

 

Some engine tuning...return of the Ram Air that Pontiac introduced in the early 1970s...and some changes to the hood to make Ram Air possible...yes those vents as nostrils were functional...it was a hit...so Pontiac made their own...but 'twas SLP that started Ram Air for the 4rt gen F-Body...Chevy got jealous and that is how the Camaro SS 4rth gen. F-Body was born...

 

Firehawk...third generation...but on a G8...

The link: http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2009-pontiac-g8-gt-slp-firehawk-specialty-file

will explain what the $52 000 price tag gets you...maybe expensive and maybe those mods can be made cheaper by you...

Like I said...I prefer stock usually...but a G8 GXP was a less of a machine than this one...OK...so you are a do-it-yourselfer...SLP cars have warranties...

 

pontiac-slp-firehawk-2_600x0w.jpg

 

 

First gen Firehawk was ridiculously expensive...had some minor issues such as the front tires being tooo wide and scraped the wheel wells when turning...so...its turning radius was affected...and its handling...and it really was considered to be a 4 passengered Corvette. The 1992 Firehawk made 350 horsepower and 350 ft/lbs of torque...

Here is the link that expalins what makes up a 1991/1992 Firehawk: http://www.hotrod.com/cars/featured/hppp-0904-1992-pontiac-firehawk/

The two most coolest 3rd Generation F-Bodies..and the fastest...belong to Pontiac...the 20th Anniversary 1989 Turbo Trans Am...and this 1991/1992 SLP Formula Firehawk...

Hawk003_zps08994433.jpg

 

Also...FWD

 Pontiac Grand Prix GTX

I cant find any links to summarize what has been made to it...but if memory serves me right...functional ram air hood...300 horsepower...tweaks on the original Eaton Supercharger already installed...

page4pic1.jpg

 

slp_gtx_tips.jpg

Edited by oldshurst442

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There are some great pre-tuned cars out there, but unless it's something special, I would rather modify it myself.

 

If I modify it myself I can make it my own, if you get what I mean? I can look at the work I've done, the bits I've added or changed and can be proud in saying that I put in the work to make it look like this. Getting a pre-tuned car, yes I would be proud of it but it would feel like a hollow sort of proudness. It would be mine, but it wouldn't be my own. Sure I could change stuff if I wanted but it just wouldn't feel the same.

 

So I'll take modifying.

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