William Maley

GM News: GM's Workers At Oshawa Want A Deal That Ensures The Future of Production

59 posts in this topic

This week, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ford, and General Motors begin talks with Unifor, Canada’s auto workers union for new agreements. GM will likely have the most contentious talks as workers at GM's Oshawa plant don't know what the future holds after 2018.

 

The plant has already lost a third shift and about 1,000 jobs when it moved production of the Camaro to Lansing last year. Next year will see the end of production of the Chevrolet Equinox, leaving just the Buick Regal and Cadillac XTS. GM has said time and time again for the past two years that it needs to know labor costs before making any decisions on the plant, only causing the worry to increase.

 

“The company in the past have had feasibility studies or launch teams if we are going to get product. This year, there’s no feasibility studies going on, no launch teams,” said Colin James, president of Unifor Local 222 to The Detroit News.

 

“Of course, it’s led to a lot of our members in the plant asking questions. There’s uncertainty: ‘Why is there no launch team?’ ‘Are they planning on closing the facility?’ General Motors is basically not answering that question.”

 

Yesterday at a news conference in Toronto, Unifor president Jerry Dias said workers at Oshawa will not sign a contract unless there are plans for production.

 

“We are not going to leave negotiations until we have a firm commitment from General Motors on product,” said Dias.

 

“We firmly believe General Motors will exit Oshawa unless we have a firm commitment.”

 

But GM has said that it will not make any commitments on investments until there is an agreement in place.

 

“We won’t be in a position to make a competitive investment decision until after we are through the negotiations,” said David Paterson, GM Canada’s vice-president of corporate affairs.

 

“We understand that there is a lot of anxiety about Oshawa," Paterson said. He went onto say that GM's focus during the talks is to work on an agreement that is "mutually beneficial and economically competitive."

 

Whether or not GM and Unifor are able to work an agreement before September 19th remains to be seen. We'll be keeping a close eye on this.

 

Source: The Toronto Star, The Detroit News



Click here to view the article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There should have been assurances put forth when the Canadian Federal and Ontario provincial governments bailed them out that GM would keep X products being assembled in Canada.

  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it. 

I think they know as well, they just don't want it to come to fruition. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well.

I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

 

I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

 

Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

 

I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

 

Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

 

http://www.wsj.com/articles/canada-sells-remaining-shares-in-general-motors-1428363868

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/04/08/gm-share-sale-canadian-government_n_

 

7024464.html

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/canada-to-sell-final-73-4-million-shares-of-gm-from-bailout/article23814942/

 

from the last link above:

Labour leaders had urged Ontario and Ottawa to hold on to the shares as a bargaining chip in securing pledges from GM to maintain jobs in Canada.

“It would have been ideal for the government to hold on to the shares and use that to leverage General Motors to make a strong commitment to the facility in Oshawa,” said Hassan Yussuff, President of the Canadian Labour Congress, in an interview Monday. “Obviously, the government is using every means possible to raise as much cash as they can without considering the future of the auto industry in the country.”

 

 

trudeau%2Bsanta%2Bcons.jpg

3298d1440c98a4107f3e82df8e21176c5abba0ea

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im disappointed in this as I see the writing on the wall.

Damned right pissed off I am.

But at the end of the day, GM has to remain profitable and if the CAW  and Oshawa cannot come to an agreement for GM to remain profitable in any way they can. Then so be it.

 

Canada should be looking at Hyundai and anybody else to build their cars here, not just GM, Ford and Chrysler,  but that also means that the CAW has to realize that Mexico is quite competitive and adept in building cars too...and part of NAFTA...

 

 

EDIT:

BECAUSE I AGREE WITH DREW ABOUT THE CAW AND I UNDERSTAND WHAT IS GOING ON BEFORE DREW MADE HIS LAST POST!!!

Edited by oldshurst442
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Regal and XTS are all they are making, that plant looks like it is closing.  XTS doesn't have much time left, the next Regal could be built where any Epsilon car is made, and they don't make that many of them to begin with.

 

Sadly I think most sedans from the Big 3 will get built in Mexico where the labor is cheaper, and the SUVs and trucks will get made here.  Unless the UAW wants to accept starting wages at $18 an hour not $29 an hour these jobs will keep leaving.  All these factories offer overtime, an entry level auto worker could still make $40k a year with benefits at $18-19 an hour.  UAW wants $60-70k a year wages to build cars, no wonder the Big 3 are leaving.  The unions aren't doing their members any favors, and the didn't do them any favors in the 90s or 2000s either.    Notice the non-union auto factories in the South are not shutting down, most of them are expanding.  And I am democrat.

Edited by smk4565

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one promises you work or a job for life, and business should never do it. Reality is you keep your trade skills sharp and learn new things or become unemployed. I am so sick of unions thinking they are superior and have to have promises of lifelong employment. Welcome to the 21st century and if you are that ignorant to not see this coming you deserve what you get.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it.

Fear makes for powerful blinders. I feel for my former co-workers. But Oshawa is done. The Government of Ontario and Unifor have combined to make it too expensive to make cars in the province. Ingersoll should take notice.

I think more of the blame lies with the CAW than with the Canadian government.

The Feds don't have much say about it. The Provincial government is mainly to blame on the elected-official side of the table.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the Regal and XTS are all they are making, that plant looks like it is closing.  XTS doesn't have much time left, the next Regal could be built where any Epsilon car is made, and they don't make that many of them to begin with.

 

Sadly I think most sedans from the Big 3 will get built in Mexico where the labor is cheaper, and the SUVs and trucks will get made here.  Unless the UAW wants to accept starting wages at $18 an hour not $29 an hour these jobs will keep leaving.  All these factories offer overtime, an entry level auto worker could still make $40k a year with benefits at $18-19 an hour.  UAW wants $60-70k a year wages to build cars, no wonder the Big 3 are leaving.  The unions aren't doing their members any favors, and the didn't do them any favors in the 90s or 2000s either.    Notice the non-union auto factories in the South are not shutting down, most of them are expanding.  And I am democrat.

 

 

Just sedans? You must be kidding.....FCA has plans to have most of their lineup built in Mexico or imported in the next ten years.....and I expect other automakers to build more down there too, as Wall Street expects a better profit margin from the automakers.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh please, I can see Oshawa closing from here..... I don't know why the workers on site wouldn't see it. 

 

 

They knew that 10 years ago.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Times have changes and Unions can no longer dictate what they want. The CAW needs to learn what most of the UAW locals have learned. 

Today GM has more plants and capacity than they need. The locals that are thriving have learned to work with GM and make a plant profitable and competitive. They make deals that are beneficial to both sides. Places like Lordstown were a steaming heap of non competitiveness. GM was on the way to closing them down. But the local there has learned to work with the new GM and they have been rewarded with good product and much in overtime. GM is making money and the UAW workers are making money. 

We see the same in Kansas and most Michigan plants. So far this is working well with balance. 

The CAW at Oshawa has been hostile and demanding and that does not play anymore. GM has options and choices that do not have to include Mexico anymore. 

Before GM had few options with the unions and were forced into many bad deals and I see them protecting themselves from this. 

 

Some folks need to still get it thought their heads that it takes a good relationship on both sides to make this work. MFG are not endless pits of money that can be abused or we will end up like 2008 but eve much faster. 

The truth is companies are here to make money and produce income to share holders. Their primary purpose is not just to provide jobs. Harsh sounding but that is how life is. As in nature a salmon must die to support a Bear. But in this case things can be worked out to where very one benefits if both sides are smart. 

As it is Oshawa got a big head as they had good ratings in quality and have a large facility but that matters little in today's markets where pretty much any plant can match their quality and smaller plants can beat their efficiency. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well.

I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

 

I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

 

Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

 

I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

 

Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

Nonsense.

In all likelihood it was Montreal's supremely inept manufacturing plant that helped secure me at least two or three more years in Oshawa than I would otherwise have gotten.

Now stop grasping at straws. You just look silly

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Well.

I also saw this coming when the CDN government sold off their remaining shares in GM.

 

I wanted to say if I was in charge of these things I would have kept a controlling interest in GM Canada shares to prevent Oshawa from closing forcing GM Detroit Headquarters to keep Oshawa open with cars being built there, but Im not sure the bailout agreement was written that way for that to happen...

 

Yep. Oshawa will be closing.

 

I wonder what El Kabong thinks about this...will he vehemently HATE on GM now he being Canadian and all?

 

Us Canadians are kinda like you Americans (THANX OBAMA), Im sure he will just blame Justin Trudeau for this and continue on ranting about FoMoCo.

Nonsense.

In all likelihood it was Montreal's supremely inept manufacturing plant that helped secure me at least two or three more years in Oshawa than I would otherwise have gotten.

Now stop grasping at straws. You just look silly

 

 

I know about that plant....

 

Chevy Celebrities would be rolling off the line while the GM worker would be sitting down on a chair reading Le Journal de Montréal and when the Celebrity would be at his station, the GM worker would put down his newspaper, get up, approach the vehicle, do what he has to do and go back to his paper awaiting the next vehicle to come his way...

 

My dad bought a brand new 1986 Chevy Celebrity.  Iron Duke powered, AM radio only stripper. I still have fond memories of that car. It served our family well!

 

This aint about that.

Its about me calling you out on a certain hypocritical view point you may have regarding GM versus FoMoCo.

 

You brought up Saint-Thérèse...

You have countless of times knocked Ford for mediocrity...

 

You see where Im getting at?

 

YOU take shots at Ford for mediocrity...

YOU brought up Sainte-Thérèse...

I call you up on hypocrisy....

 

Sorry El K...

C'est La Vie!

150811165239-trump-shrug-gif-custom-1.gi

 

 

 

I REALLY SHOULD DO A CANADIAN ONE....

justin-trudeau-shrug.gif

Edited by oldshurst442

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't be sorry.

I ain't, so why should you be?

 

 

Oh...that wasnt me being apologetic..

 

That was me being polite telling you to...go get your &@#$+# shine box

 

Trying to make it seem like Im kidding with you....busting your ballz a little bit...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh.

...I still don't feel bad. Ford stuff don't do a whole lot for me at the best of times, and too many of their fans say stupid things for me to not laugh/cringe at them.

Like blaming True-d'oh for Oshawa's predicament, for instance. There's plenty I can make fun of him for... but this ain't one of them.

Sure helped you make a nice leap to take a dig at me tho

Edited by El Kabong
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh.

...I still don't feel bad. Ford stuff don't do a whole lot for me at the best of times, and too many of their fans say stupid things for me to not laugh/cringe at.

 

Riiiiiight!

 

You consume yourself silly daily laughing at Ford because of what Ford fans say....

 

What you just said  would be some of the stupid things GM fans say and THAT makes ANYBODY laugh/cringe at...

 

Again...this whole hypocrisy thing...

You just cant seem to shake that off, can you?

 

 

About Trudeau and taking a nice leap to take a dig at you....

 

That is the beauty of it....

You probably thought of it...so it wasnt much of a nice leap  as it was a just a little casual stroll...laughing at you....having fun at your expense, the way I did with Wings....

 

Its easy to do to both of you since both of you have only 1 objective....

 

OK....

ONWARD and upward moving forward about Oshawa.....

Edited by oldshurst442

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Times have changes and Unions can no longer dictate what they want. The CAW needs to learn what most of the UAW locals have learned. 

Today GM has more plants and capacity than they need. The locals that are thriving have learned to work with GM and make a plant profitable and competitive. They make deals that are beneficial to both sides. Places like Lordstown were a steaming heap of non competitiveness. GM was on the way to closing them down. But the local there has learned to work with the new GM and they have been rewarded with good product and much in overtime. GM is making money and the UAW workers are making money. 

We see the same in Kansas and most Michigan plants. So far this is working well with balance. 

The CAW at Oshawa has been hostile and demanding and that does not play anymore. GM has options and choices that do not have to include Mexico anymore. 

Before GM had few options with the unions and were forced into many bad deals and I see them protecting themselves from this. 

 

Some folks need to still get it thought their heads that it takes a good relationship on both sides to make this work. MFG are not endless pits of money that can be abused or we will end up like 2008 but eve much faster. 

The truth is companies are here to make money and produce income to share holders. Their primary purpose is not just to provide jobs. Harsh sounding but that is how life is. As in nature a salmon must die to support a Bear. But in this case things can be worked out to where very one benefits if both sides are smart. 

As it is Oshawa got a big head as they had good ratings in quality and have a large facility but that matters little in today's markets where pretty much any plant can match their quality and smaller plants can beat their efficiency. 

 

Bump....

 

Because the last couple of posts after this one is just a hot pile of shyte!

And THIS is bang on to what is going on in Oshawa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice hot take.

Or you could ask the guy who, you know, used to actually WORK AT OSHAWA.

...back in '06 or so when the 'schwa was churning out Impalas and Centurys to fleets far and wide I told a union brother that as it currently sits the place had about ten or fifteen years left in it. He thought I was nuts. But I read the news and the magazines and sales and percentage breakdowns. The place was building mostly mediocre stuff-that simple. And I wasn't afraid to bust GM's chops for it even as I helped build it, mainly in the old AWCC. Just awful stuff. Even their "innovations" were bad-transverse smallblocks driving front wheels wider than the rears?

The housing crash and Great Recession came shortly after, of course. And in between the (very good) truck plant got taken away because of cheaper labor in Mexico. The product deficiencies and truck plant, plus the recession, should have clued Unifor in that things needed to change, and clued in management that they needed better product to build.

Unfortunately the union missed the point entirely, and the product was hit (Camaro) and miss (Regal). I suspect that CAW/Unifor had reached the same conclusions about Oshawa as I had but decided on a long-term strategy of getting the old boys as many 30-year pensions as they could rather then roll with the punches and restructure contracts and wage models. And now you have the endgame playing out before your eyes.

Alternately, you could do verbal diarrhea with personal digs and politician name-dropping as informed conversation. I'll see if I can get Mean Gene Okerlund on the phone to moderate that.

Edited by El Kabong
  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

verbal diarrhea is what you do....

 

Like Wings.....YOU are VERY insightful...yet you dont share those views with us....you grace our presence with crap biased agaisnt and solely at Ford..and to get away with it..you have nice Vince McMahon speeches yourself, such as your signature: It's just facts. Nothing personal.

 

 

You wanna get Mean Gene Okerlund?

 

OK....as long as I could get  Stone Cold Steve Austin!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nonsense.

My time in Oshawa was absolutely critical to making the views I hold today. I saw firsthand the futility of whoring out to fleet and minimizing product innovation. I saw people pat themselves on the back and crow about improvements in sales numbers and vehicle quality when they were only measuring against their own past efforts. Most of all, I saw how destructive those blinders and hidebound ideologies were to a brand.

At this point I should point out that you're choosing a guy who slapped around his wife to use as an example for... well, I'm not really sure what.

Jes' sayin'

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nonsense.

My time in Oshawa was absolutely critical to making the views I hold today. I saw firsthand the futility of whoring out to fleet and minimizing product innovation. I saw people pat themselves on the back and crow about improvements in sales numbers and vehicle quality when they were only measuring against their own past efforts. Most of all, I saw how destructive those blinders and hidebound ideologies were to a brand.

At this point I should point out that you're choosing a guy who slapped around his wife to use as an example for... well, I'm not really sure what.

Jes' sayin'

 

Jes sayin....for what?

 

Stone Cold Steve is just a character on TV and the wrestling circuit...for entertainment

Just like this character......

 

 

el-kabong-o.gif

 

The man playing Stone Cold Steve is the one with the problems...

Dont know him, dont really care for him...

 

However....I aint the one that has named my internet persona as some sort of sexual perverse joke of some sort....

 

URBAN DICTIONARY:

 

 

A surprise attack using a flacid penis to startle an unsuspecting victim. This is usually done by slapping a distracted person across the face or head with your penis while yelling the phrase "El Kabong" to proclaim your successful prank over the El Kabonged individual, and alert any witnesses to the humorous use of your private parts.

 

 

Jes sayin'

 

 

And yes...we can continue...

Onward, upward and moving forward.

Edited by oldshurst442
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      The strike at General Motors' CAMI Assembly plant, home of the Chevrolet Equinox has come to an end. Today, 86 percent of Unifor Local 88 members voted yes on a new 4-year contract. With the approval, workers will resume work at the plant beginning at 7 PM tonight for early start-up, with production beginning at 11 PM.
      Here is what new 4-year contract include
      Stronger language around job security. Union said the new contract would make it more costly for GM to close down CAMI - $290 million vs. $190 million. If CAMI is shuttered, employees near retirement will still be able to get into a retirement program. Workers will get a 4 percent wage hike and $8,000 in lump-sum payments over the contract New hires on the production line will see an accelerated pace in terms of their wages increased to the max of $34.15 per hour A $6,000 performance bonus once the deal is ratified "The ratification of a new 4-year agreement between GM Canada and Unifor Local 88 at CAMI Assembly is welcome news for our company, employees and the community. We have an outstanding new product at CAMI with the Chevrolet Equinox and I am confident that we will quickly pull together to continue to demonstrate to the world the outstanding productivity, innovation and quality that is synonymous with the CAMI workforce," said Steve Carlisle, President of GM Canada in a statement.
      There is one thing missing from this contract, a written assurance that CAMI would be the lead producer of the Equinox. This was the major point of contention between the two during negoations.
      It is clear that Unifor officials are not happy with this contract.
      “The end result was not the result we were hoping for, it shows the true colors of GM,” Unifor Local 88 Chair Mike Van Boekel said in a statement to members.
      Given these actions, our demand to protect the Equinox was not only fair and reasonable, it simply made sense. Our members had every reason to make this [lead producer] demand, and did everything to demonstrate it was a demand that deserved to be met. However, at the highest levels of General Motors corporate in Detroit, they coldly refused. As a result and after much internal discussion, we decided that we could not, in good conscience, ask for more economic sacrifice from you in this fight,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias.
      We have to wonder if GM's threat of ramping up Equinox production in Mexico issued last week was the turning point.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), CBC News, GM
      Press Release is on Page 2
      2017 CAMI / UNIFOR NEGOTIATIONS
      The ratification of a new 4-year agreement between GM Canada and Unifor Local 88 at CAMI Assembly is welcome news for our company, employees and the community. We have an outstanding new product at CAMI with the Chevrolet Equinox and I am confident that we will quickly pull together to continue to demonstrate to the world the outstanding productivity, innovation and quality that is synonymous with the CAMI workforce.
      I want to extend thanks to the local and national Unifor teams who have worked long hours together with the GM negotiating team these past many weeks. The negotiations process requires a great deal of straight talk, creative problem solving, and compromise to achieve a positive outcome for both the membership and the Company.  Success is also achieved by remembering that we are here to serve our customers proudly and deliver the very best product and services to them. 
      Having grown up in Southwestern Ontario, the CAMI plant and the Oxford County community mean a great deal to me.  The challenges of the past months have been hard on all of us but now it’s time to show the character of our region and our plant. With the recent $800 million investment at the CAMI plant and this agreement, it is up to each of us to demonstrate the unparalleled value we deliver as leaders within Canada’s auto sector. The employees at CAMI have created a culture of team involvement and continuous improvement resulting in numerous industry awards for vehicle quality and productivity.  I am confident that by working as one team, that will continue for years to come.
      Steve Carlisle
      President and Managing Director
      General Motors Canada 

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The strike at General Motors' CAMI Assembly plant, home of the Chevrolet Equinox has come to an end. Today, 86 percent of Unifor Local 88 members voted yes on a new 4-year contract. With the approval, workers will resume work at the plant beginning at 7 PM tonight for early start-up, with production beginning at 11 PM.
      Here is what new 4-year contract include
      Stronger language around job security. Union said the new contract would make it more costly for GM to close down CAMI - $290 million vs. $190 million. If CAMI is shuttered, employees near retirement will still be able to get into a retirement program. Workers will get a 4 percent wage hike and $8,000 in lump-sum payments over the contract New hires on the production line will see an accelerated pace in terms of their wages increased to the max of $34.15 per hour A $6,000 performance bonus once the deal is ratified "The ratification of a new 4-year agreement between GM Canada and Unifor Local 88 at CAMI Assembly is welcome news for our company, employees and the community. We have an outstanding new product at CAMI with the Chevrolet Equinox and I am confident that we will quickly pull together to continue to demonstrate to the world the outstanding productivity, innovation and quality that is synonymous with the CAMI workforce," said Steve Carlisle, President of GM Canada in a statement.
      There is one thing missing from this contract, a written assurance that CAMI would be the lead producer of the Equinox. This was the major point of contention between the two during negoations.
      It is clear that Unifor officials are not happy with this contract.
      “The end result was not the result we were hoping for, it shows the true colors of GM,” Unifor Local 88 Chair Mike Van Boekel said in a statement to members.
      Given these actions, our demand to protect the Equinox was not only fair and reasonable, it simply made sense. Our members had every reason to make this [lead producer] demand, and did everything to demonstrate it was a demand that deserved to be met. However, at the highest levels of General Motors corporate in Detroit, they coldly refused. As a result and after much internal discussion, we decided that we could not, in good conscience, ask for more economic sacrifice from you in this fight,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias.
      We have to wonder if GM's threat of ramping up Equinox production in Mexico issued last week was the turning point.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), CBC News, GM
      Press Release is on Page 2
      2017 CAMI / UNIFOR NEGOTIATIONS
      The ratification of a new 4-year agreement between GM Canada and Unifor Local 88 at CAMI Assembly is welcome news for our company, employees and the community. We have an outstanding new product at CAMI with the Chevrolet Equinox and I am confident that we will quickly pull together to continue to demonstrate to the world the outstanding productivity, innovation and quality that is synonymous with the CAMI workforce.
      I want to extend thanks to the local and national Unifor teams who have worked long hours together with the GM negotiating team these past many weeks. The negotiations process requires a great deal of straight talk, creative problem solving, and compromise to achieve a positive outcome for both the membership and the Company.  Success is also achieved by remembering that we are here to serve our customers proudly and deliver the very best product and services to them. 
      Having grown up in Southwestern Ontario, the CAMI plant and the Oxford County community mean a great deal to me.  The challenges of the past months have been hard on all of us but now it’s time to show the character of our region and our plant. With the recent $800 million investment at the CAMI plant and this agreement, it is up to each of us to demonstrate the unparalleled value we deliver as leaders within Canada’s auto sector. The employees at CAMI have created a culture of team involvement and continuous improvement resulting in numerous industry awards for vehicle quality and productivity.  I am confident that by working as one team, that will continue for years to come.
      Steve Carlisle
      President and Managing Director
      General Motors Canada 
    • By William Maley
      After a month-long strike and threat earlier this week, General Motors and Unifor Local 88 have reached an tentative agreement for workers at the CAMI assembly plant. Last night, Unifor Local 88 made the announcement via email to its workers. Details of the agreement are being kept under wraps until a ratification vote is held on Monday. If the agreement is approved, workers will return to the plant starting at 11 PM Monday night.
      "We have addressed job security which will be in this deal. I think it's a fair agreement  ... and everybody is looking forward to going back to work and making vehicles their customers want, knowing there will be some sort of job security there," said Mike Van Boekel, the union's plant chair at CAMI to CBC News.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), CBC News

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      After a month-long strike and threat earlier this week, General Motors and Unifor Local 88 have reached an tentative agreement for workers at the CAMI assembly plant. Last night, Unifor Local 88 made the announcement via email to its workers. Details of the agreement are being kept under wraps until a ratification vote is held on Monday. If the agreement is approved, workers will return to the plant starting at 11 PM Monday night.
      "We have addressed job security which will be in this deal. I think it's a fair agreement  ... and everybody is looking forward to going back to work and making vehicles their customers want, knowing there will be some sort of job security there," said Mike Van Boekel, the union's plant chair at CAMI to CBC News.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), CBC News
    • By Suaviloquent
      NAFTA
      The latest rounds of the renegotiation talks have started, and they have an emphasis on U.S. demanding new content rules.
      Just to summarize, the U.S. wants more domestic content, which means NAFTA region countries, and 50% mandatory U.S. content, just to name a few of the changes.
      This hopefully isn't too political of an issue, it's more to do with how you feel about the rules should be for automakers and their suppliers doing business in America, Canada and Mexico.
      I think the U.S. demands - on paper, atleast are fair. U.S. is the largest market for autos in NAFTA region. I want to hear more of just how you feel about this issue. Feel free to source links where more of your opinions can be expanded and read more about. 
       
       
  • My Clubs

  • Who's Online (See full list)