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    William Maley

    2018 Kia Stinger to Begin At $32,800, GT At $39,200

      How much will Kia's new RWD sedan set you back?


    Kia has revealed the pricing for the 2018 Stinger and Stinger GT that will be arriving at dealers next month. The base Stinger with a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder will begin at $32,800. The twin-turbo 3.3 V6 Stinger GT kicks off at $39,250. Prices include a $900 destination charge.

    The Stinger comes standard with 18-inch wheels, limited slip differential, leather upholstery, power adjustable front seats with heat, dual-zone climate control, keyless ignition, and a 7-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. Stinger GT models add adaptive dampers, Brembo brakes, and a nine-speaker audio system with external amplifier. All-wheel drive is available for an extra $2,200 with either engine.

    “Although the Stinger is unlike any other Kia that has come before it in terms of pure driving enjoyment, it is still very much a traditional Kia in that it offers consumers a very compelling value proposition, providing excellent performance and handling, premium features and functionality when compared to its much higher-priced competitors.” said Orth Hedrick, vice president of product planning for Kia Motor America.

    Source: Kia
    Press Release is on Page 2


    KIA MOTORS AMERICA ANNOUNCES 2018 STINGER PRICING

    • Fastback Performance Sedan Brings Kia to New Heights While Maintaining Remarkable Value
    • Stinger delivers head-turning design, premium amenities and heart-pounding power at an incredibly value-packed price
    • Combination of aggressive pricing and spirited performance makes Stinger a compelling alternative to substantially more expensive luxury sport sedans

    IRVINE, Calif., November 16, 2017 — Kia Motors America (KMA) today announced pricing for the highly anticipated all-new 2018 Stinger fastback sport sedan.  Expected to arrive in Kia dealers in December1, the highest-performance production vehicle in the company’s history will be offered in five trim levels – Stinger, Stinger Premium, GT, GT1, and GT2.

    • Stinger starts at $31,900
    • Stinger Premium starts at $37,100
    • GT starts at $38,350
    • GT1 starts at $43,250
    • GT2 starts at $49,200
    • All-wheel drive:  $2,200
    • Destination: $900

    “The Stinger is a prime example of Kia’s commitment to surpassing consumers’ expectations in everything we do,” said Orth Hedrick, vice president of product planning, KMA. “Although the Stinger is unlike any other Kia that has come before it in terms of pure driving enjoyment, it is still very much a traditional Kia in that it offers consumers a very compelling value proposition, providing excellent performance and handling, premium features and functionality when compared to its much higher-priced competitors.”

    Designed in Frankfurt, developed on the Nürburgring, and built by the brand ranked highest by J.D. Power in initial quality3, the Stinger is offered with multiple engine and drivetrain configurations and luxurious accommodations. All Stingers come standard with a leather-appointed interior, though ultra-soft Nappa leather is available. A thick hand-stitched multifunction leather-wrapped steering wheel with paddle shifters sits front and center of the driver, while the GT trim gets a flat-bottom steering wheel.  All Stingers are available with a large color TFT instrument cluster with performance gauges including a track timer, and in true gran turismo fashion, the Stinger has a generous 23.3 cu.-ft. of cargo space that can be accessed via a power liftgate with available Smart Trunk functionality.

    The base Stinger rides on a passive suspension tuned to offer a balance of handling and ride comfort, while the GT is available with Kia’s first electronically controlled Dynamic Stability Damping Control and standard high-performance Brembo®4 disc brakes. Two turbocharged engines are available: The base Stinger and Premium trims get a 2.0-liter twin-scroll turbocharged four-cylinder engine that produces 255 horsepower at 6,200 rpm with 260 lb.-ft. of maximum torque available from 1,400 – 4,000 rpm. Stingers wearing the GT moniker get a more powerful 3.3-liter twin-turbo V6 which produces 365 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and offers 376 lb.-ft. of torque from 1,300 – 4,500 rpm.  Both engines are matched to a second-generation eight-speed rear-drive automatic transmission. All-wheel drive also is available across all trims.

    Multiple Advance Driver Assistance systems work together to enhance the driving experience, including Driver Attention Warning (DAW)5, Forward Collision Avoidance (FCA)6 with pedestrian detection, Smart Cruise Control with Stop & Go (SCC w/ S&G)6, Lane Keeping Assist (LKA) 6, Blind Spot Collision Warning (BCW) 6, and Rear Cross-Traffic Collision Warning (RCCW)6.  A height-adjustable color Head-Up Display (HUD)7 display is also available.

    The base audio system for the 2.0-liter turbo features six speakers and a seven-inch color touchscreen with the latest version of UVO, Kia’s award-winning telematics systems8. The standard system found in the GT trim ups the speaker count to nine and includes an external amplifier. A premium Harman/Kardon®9 audio system that features Clari-Fi™10 and next-generation QuantumLogic™11 Surround Sound technology is also available.

    Edited by William Maley

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    Be interesting to see how it does in this day and age or people changing from cars to CUVs and from ICE to EV/Hybrids. 

    I think it will hit the right note, but just not sure how many will buy.

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    In a way it is competitively priced in another way I think they are a little high.  I see this car's real competitors as Camaro and Mustang, but the Stinger has 4 doors.  You can get a Mustang premium for $30k and a Mustang GT for $35k, and I haven't looked feature by feature, but I imagine a lot of the equipment is similar on both cars.   And to that point a V8 Dodge Charger is $35k, a V8 Chrysler 300 is $39k, and they always have big discounts at FCA dealerships.  

    The version that Car and Driver drove was $50,000, that is just too much for a Kia.  $29,900 base and $37,000 for the V6 would have looked more competitive.  The problem I suspect is Kia will see BMW or Alfa Romeo as their competition, which it isn't.

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    7 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    The version that Car and Driver drove was $50,000, that is just too much for a Kia.  $29,900 base and $37,000 for the V6 would have looked more competitive.  The problem I suspect is Kia will see BMW or Alfa Romeo as their competition, which it isn't.

    You do not know that it is way too much for a Kia, your showing your badge snob as I would say that 60% of the MB auto's are way overpriced. Everything from the MB A class to the C class is way overpriced for what you get and in that regards much of the E and S class too in comparison to much better deals from other makers.

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    Well, Kia already has cars more expensive--the Credenza and K900, which compete against Genesis and others in the luxury space.  It will be interesting to see how the Stinger is received as a sports sedan...something about it does make me think 'Kia Charger' more than Audi, BMW, MB, etc competitor.. part of that is the name, which really sounds like it should been a Dodge name in the late 60s... 

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    28 minutes ago, smk4565 said:

    In a way it is competitively priced in another way I think they are a little high.  I see this car's real competitors as Camaro and Mustang, but the Stinger has 4 doors.  You can get a Mustang premium for $30k and a Mustang GT for $35k, and I haven't looked feature by feature, but I imagine a lot of the equipment is similar on both cars.   And to that point a V8 Dodge Charger is $35k, a V8 Chrysler 300 is $39k, and they always have big discounts at FCA dealerships.  

    The version that Car and Driver drove was $50,000, that is just too much for a Kia.  $29,900 base and $37,000 for the V6 would have looked more competitive.  The problem I suspect is Kia will see BMW or Alfa Romeo as their competition, which it isn't.

    Badge snob alert being that you have never sat in much less driven to one to think it’s “a little high”. Furthmore, unlike the Charger and 300, this one can actually take turns. 

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    39 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    Badge snob alert being that you have never sat in much less driven to one to think it’s “a little high”. Furthmore, unlike the Charger and 300, this one can actually take turns. 

    Please tell us more about your experiences driving Chargers and 300s.  And furthermore, Kia Stingers.

     

    Edited by ocnblu
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    1 hour ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Well, Kia already has cars more expensive--the Credenza and K900, which compete against Genesis and others in the luxury space.  It will be interesting to see how the Stinger is received as a sports sedan...something about it does make me think 'Kia Charger' more than Audi, BMW, MB, etc competitor.. part of that is the name, which really sounds like it should been a Dodge name in the late 60s... 

    In pictures...the Stinger has intrigued me as of late.

    In pictures, I find the Stinger to be a good looking sedan. I stress "in pictures" because I got to see it in person first to let  go of my own negative Korean car biases.

    But I do like the Genesis...so I dont know why I still hold this bias...I wouldnt buy one...but I like it!

    I see the Stinger more of a RWD Optima rather than a  "Kia Charger" though. Not that that is bad thing. Whether I find its a RWD Optima or you view it as a Kia Charger.

    To be honest...I think its a GREAT thing that KIA and Hyundai are offering enthusiast machines. Yes Hyundai and KIA enthusiast  machines are a work in progress, at least they are heading in an enthusiast direction. And heading in a good direction at that!

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    8 minutes ago, ocnblu said:

    How did he like it.  Did he autocross it?

    HE LOVED IT!!!

    He wished he could have another!

    Although I dont agree with his assessment that these cars dont handle well. I think they handle well enough...but then again...I never daily driven one like he did...

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    8 minutes ago, oldshurst442 said:

    In pictures...the Stinger has intrigued me as of late.

    In pictures, I find the Stinger to be a good looking sedan. I stress "in pictures" because I got to see it in person first to let  go of my own negative Korean car biases.

    But I do like the Genesis...so I dont know why I still hold this bias...I wouldnt buy one...but I like it!

    I see the Stinger more of a RWD Optima rather than a  "Kia Charger" though. Not that that is bad thing. Whether I find its a RWD Optima or you view it as a Kia Charger. 

    Yes, me too...in pictures. Have yet to see it in person. The roofline does look straight off the previous Optima... my Charger reference isn't because of the styling, but the name and the concept--a mainstream brand largish RWD sports sedan..the Charger is really the only other one out there... I think it's great that Kia, Hyundai and Genesis are aspiring to make world class sports sedans and luxury cars..more competition is a good thing...

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    17 minutes ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Yes, me too...in pictures. Have yet to see it in person. The roofline does look straight off the previous Optima... my Charger reference isn't because of the styling, but the name and the concept--a mainstream brand largish RWD sports sedan..the Charger is really the only other one out there... I think it's great that Kia, Hyundai and Genesis are aspiring to make world class sports sedans and luxury cars..more competition is a good thing...

    Yes! Yes!

    Most definitely does the name Stinger belong to a Mopar from the 1960s!

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    "Stinger" reminds me of "Super Bee", so yeah, there is that aspect... and I believe Kia is trading on American nostalgia with the name they chose.

     

    Would love to see a Dodge Hornet compact with a turbo 4... such a natural family name... Hudson Hornet begat the AMC Hornet (wasn't there a family line there?) and AMC was absorbed by Chrysler... hence the once and future Dodge Hornet...

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    1 hour ago, dfelt said:

    You do not know that it is way too much for a Kia, your showing your badge snob as I would say that 60% of the MB auto's are way overpriced. Everything from the MB A class to the C class is way overpriced for what you get and in that regards much of the E and S class too in comparison to much better deals from other makers.

    I am glad Kia made a rear drive car, I wish there were more of them out there.  But imagine Chevy trying to sell a sedan smaller than the Malibu for $40-50k, when they tried a full size car with a V8 for $45k that didn't work.  

    The Stinger is a better deal than the Regal, but there are Camaro, Mustang, Challenger, Charger, 300 for less money.  I think if they priced it like and targeted Mustang and Camaro (performance with a back seat and awd) then Kia could get a lot of sales.  If they try to be a value play to the Germans it won't work.

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    31 minutes ago, ocnblu said:

     

    Would love to see a Dodge Hornet compact with a turbo 4... such a natural family name... Hudson Hornet begat the AMC Hornet (wasn't there a family line there?) and AMC was absorbed by Chrysler... hence the once and future Dodge Hornet...

    Yep, AMC was created by the merger of Nash and Hudson.   As far as Dodge compacts, it's too bad Dodge wasn't able to see success w/ the Dart..not sure what the issue there was..

    Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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    2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

    How did he like it.  Did he autocross it?

    If the Magnum had feelings I am sure the auto was cross with him when he sold it.

    1 hour ago, ocnblu said:

    "Stinger" reminds me of "Super Bee", so yeah, there is that aspect... and I believe Kia is trading on American nostalgia with the name they chose.

     

    Would love to see a Dodge Hornet compact with a turbo 4... such a natural family name... Hudson Hornet begat the AMC Hornet (wasn't there a family line there?) and AMC was absorbed by Chrysler... hence the once and future Dodge Hornet...

    My wife's family had an AMC hornet when she was a kid...in families and car companies there are parts of the past that really belong in the closet.

    2 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Yes, me too...in pictures. Have yet to see it in person. The roofline does look straight off the previous Optima... my Charger reference isn't because of the styling, but the name and the concept--a mainstream brand largish RWD sports sedan..the Charger is really the only other one out there... I think it's great that Kia, Hyundai and Genesis are aspiring to make world class sports sedans and luxury cars..more competition is a good thing...

    I love the aspirations of the Korean companies.  A real part of me is excited as an enthusiast here.

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    3 hours ago, smk4565 said:

     

    The version that Car and Driver drove was $50,000, that is just too much for a Kia.  $29,900 base and $37,000 for the V6 would have looked more competitive.  The problem I suspect is Kia will see BMW or Alfa Romeo as their competition, which it isn't.

    Unlike the BMW and the Alfa this thing will self propel after the warranty expires without expensive life support.

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    13 minutes ago, A Horse With No Name said:

    Unlike the BMW and the Alfa this thing will self propel after the warranty expires without expensive life support.

    Maybe, maybe not we don’t know too much about long term reliably of the Hyundai twin turbo V6, but Kia scores well in reliability ratings.

    The Kia will depreciate twice as fast as a BMW though, a five year old 3-Series will probably sell for $10,000 more than a five year old Stinger.  Case in point, a 2015 Kia K900 V8 was $59,000 new, they sell certified used for $27,000 now, that is a hell of a drop.

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    5 hours ago, Cubical-aka-Moltar said:

    Well, Kia already has cars more expensive--the Credenza and K900, which compete against Genesis and others in the luxury space.

    Kia cannot give the K900 away- it's a flop. September US sales : 31. It's a $50K Kia. Yeah.

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    4 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    Maybe, maybe not we don’t know too much about long term reliably of the Hyundai twin turbo V6, but Kia scores well in reliability ratings.

    The Kia will depreciate twice as fast as a BMW though, a five year old 3-Series will probably sell for $10,000 more than a five year old Stinger.  Case in point, a 2015 Kia K900 V8 was $59,000 new, they sell certified used for $27,000 now, that is a hell of a drop.

    Agreed.  It's almost Mercedes-like.

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    Hey to those of you actually interested in this car - test drive it, but buy it in Canada, have it delivered there and then import it back into the U.S.

    For some inexplicable reason, the car fully loaded in Canada is priced $5000 less nominally. That's before you factor in exchange rates. We Canadians get a massive discount on this car. Also, missing features like a 360 degree camera are included in the Canadian market car.

    Seriously - it's the SS car Chevy stopped making, Ford cannot possibly build without sinking billions, and Chrysler won't make for atleast another 4 years, if they even try to remake the Charger or 300 on the Giulia platform.

    Kia is by introducing this car the last holdout in the affordable RWD performance 4 door grand tourer.

     

     

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    • Prices going up. Economy not fully recovered. Supply shortages. Money printer going brrrr... I think of the following words. Stagflation... And  A word that starts with 'C' and ends with 'm'. In Canada - (no incentives for people to work below a certain income level, reducing productivity and making costs go up). Oops I might be derailing thread. Please no one entertain the kind of word I was thinking. Yeah lumber prices are bad. I heard Canada (where I live) might be limiting exports due to the cancellations of keystone too. Not sure if true or not. As for Tesla cars. I don't think any car maker could sell those cheap Wuling things yet in NA. I don't see the price points ever going lower, maybe some more features for the money down the line. And Tesla is about to be inundated with competition. I think their position is not nearly as strong as when the Model Y came out. Paper tiger maybe.
    • Supply down + Demand Up = higher prices.... not that hard. Prices for nearly everything are going up. It has nothing to do with BEVs.  It has to do with everything from lumber to microchips being in short supply. Also... prices for used and new gasoline powered vehicles is going up too, so at worst, BEVs are just keeping pace with the industry as a whole. Furthermore, no one gave a date as to when the cost of BEVs would dip below ICEs, so calling that misinformation is substantially premature.  The big, experienced manufacturers like GM and MB have been awoken like a sleeping dragon and the new BEV platforms coming from them are going to be serious entries, not just an electric motor thrown in one of their gasser models with a bunch of laptop batteries in the trunk. As of about 3 years ago, they all started taking BEVs seriously. There will be economies of scale as the cells of a Silverado don't need to be any different in composition than the cells in a Bolt... the only difference will be quantity.  GM will no longer need to build 197 different powertrain combinations, it will be reduced to 10 (if memory serves, it's somewhere in that ballpark of a delta in powertrains). There will no longer be a need for complex 10-speed transmissions. No AWD systems. No exhaust systems. There won't be complex electro-mechanical systems to turn cylinders on and off while driving. There won't be turbo-chargers. There won't be those electronic shutters that close a grille at speed. All of that stuff listed that needs to be engineered and re-engineered every 5 - 7 years will go away. None of that is in place today and no one claimed it would be in place by today, but you have the combined industrial might of GM, Ford, BMW, Mercedes, VW, Hyundai, Telsa, Panasonic, Samsung, LG, and others working on it.
    • On a side note, all of my closest friends recently bought bikes either this year or last year and it REALLY has given me the itch. I just don't have a garage for one yet and couldn't justify spending the money when we have a home to finish and garage to build.. Two of them have some Harley of sorts and two of them have Indians, none of them are my style or anywhere near what I would want to ride. I'm a HUGE fan of the naked sporty bikes.  Something like a Monster 796,  Triumph Street Triple 675, Yamaha MT-09, would be perfect for me
    • ^ Not sure it's that specific; on the Silverado/Sierra, the active safety features package is optional, and costs $890. I do think electronics in general are responsible for most of the recent price escalations. I can easily see calling claims of 'BE's are going to cost the same or less than ICs' as "misinformation".   
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