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Drew Dowdell

How to get your landlord to hate you.

48 posts in this topic

Only took one post to get this thread tog o downhill. :P

That sucks dude...in our own house I did it to keep the rug in place, but then out hardwood floors are in crappy shape anyway so I don't care (last owner put nasty red and yellow carpeting over the hardwood floors).

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had this tenant not put so many holes in the walls I wouldn't have to repaint the place because it's otherwise fine.

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You know what would be cheaper? An electrical "accident" that destroys the place. Insurance fraud is free!

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wall filler FTW?

Unless is the magic wall filler that matches color to the wall around it, it'll still have to be painted.

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My dad owns apartments, and has a few horror stories; a substantial amount of them involve tenants doing their own painting, often not using any form of planning, and choosing the worst colours evar.

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Unless is the magic wall filler that matches color to the wall around it, it'll still have to be painted.

Point, I don't know why I forgot that.

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The walls are white but she still put so many holes and did so much damage that I have to paint the place again.

The worst was the apartment next to this one. Albert and I use that former tenants first name as a descriptor of how dirty something is. "How dirty? Sadeeka dirty!" You know those beads people sometimes put in children's hair? I have a very rude, very un-PC, very likely to get me sued somehow, name for those beads because of that apartment.

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Will you seek out Sadeeka and make her sad?:huh:
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I imagine you keep those deposits in an interest-bearing account so you never lose money on repairs you find necessary.
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I imagine you keep those deposits in an interest-bearing account so you never lose money on repairs you find necessary.

not allowed.

If I keep the deposits in an interest bearing account, I have to return the interest to the tenant at the end of the lease term. It's too difficult to keep track of so I don't do it.

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At my last apartment, I got back about $20 out of a $300 security deposit. Besides the destroyed garage door (I backed through it when closed), I also pretty much destroyed both bathrooms (weak modern low-flush toilets always stopped up, the tub separated from the wall, carpeting pretty much worn out, etc.. It was a brand-new place, I was the first resident, stayed there 5 years until I bought my 1st condo.

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My first apartment had a $300 security deposit. We had pictures nailed up and some black bedding pigment rubbed onto the bedroom wall; however, after we replaced a light cover that was cracked (wasn't our doing and was missed on pre-inspection) we washed all the walls, closets, cupboards, windows, fireplace, deck, storage room and cleaned the carpets to have $250 returned. $50 covers mandatory carpet cleaning when moving out. We offered to fill all the nail holes but the building manager said he preferred to do it himself because they had poor experiences with tenants in the past botching the repairs. To be honest, we cleaned areas that had never seen a cloth. The tops of the kitchen cupboards had layers of dust and grease that had been there for years. The manager admitted that he rarely ever returns any deposits; however, we were so good to the place and did such a great job cleaning that he was just glad that hole filling and spot painting was the ONLY thing he had to do for the next tenant.

For many landlords, a security deposit will cover simple repairs; however, many tenants also get charged for additional repairs if they were responsible for the damages. My mother has a rental place and I hardly ever feel any compassion for tenants when it comes to the amount of damage they cause to the living space. Being a landlord is tough.

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Haha, Drew, you would LOVE me as a tenant... when I went to leave my old place and they did the walkthrough to see if I left things in good order, the guy said, "Wait, did you even live here?! My GOD, other than a coat of paint, I have to do NOTHING. It's IMMACULATE."

I'm a neat freak, what can I say.

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Yep, owning means I can put holes wherever the hell I want. Just looking around in the office ('twas my bedroom in high school) there are about a dozen holes, plus the piss-poor patch job on the wall where the door handle went into the drywall. The other rooms are probably just as bad, I didn't bother looking around when I bought the place, I knew what I was getting into. I've got to say, my dad did a hell of a job fixing the hole in the ceiling created that one time I was in the attic and mis-stepped and fell into the hallway.

Edited by Satty
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I can't wait to own.... :yes:

It has its perks, as well as its drawbacks. We rented our house for a year before we bought it from the owners. That was the best advantage because anything that ever needed repairs was covered while we were renting; so by the time we bought it, we knew exactly what was good and bad about the place. The biggest problem with owning is all the potential extra costs, if you can't manage to do any of the repairs yourself with just the cost of materials to worry about. The biggest advantage is utilizing the value of the home for equity.

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I am so glad I own with my Mom. And a brand new house so I shouldnt have to worry too much about repairs for maybe 20 years or so. Rent iasnt cheap here either so I am just as glad I own. Plus nobody playingt their TV really loud in the next apartment or partying and waking you up. And you are building equity.

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It has its perks, as well as its drawbacks. We rented our house for a year before we bought it from the owners. That was the best advantage because anything that ever needed repairs was covered while we were renting; so by the time we bought it, we knew exactly what was good and bad about the place. The biggest problem with owning is all the potential extra costs, if you can't manage to do any of the repairs yourself with just the cost of materials to worry about. The biggest advantage is utilizing the value of the home for equity.

Considering the bashing I'm getting this year, rent to own could work (though I'm not a fan of it)

As far as repairs, it helps to know "people"... 8)

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