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Camino LS6

The Pinto thread got me thinking

43 posts in this topic

...about other automotive issues associated with certain decades. Anyone remember the early days of clearcoat paint?

How about all the peeling Neons early on?

Or the bare Galvanized cowls of Ford Pickups in the 70s?

Maybe the rotten egg smell of catalytic converters in the late 80s and early nineteies?

Discuss.

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I remember people parking cars over leaves during the fall when Catalytic converters first came out. Few cars died by fire that way.

One fire down the street from my grandparetns was rather spectacular.

Chris

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Also...remember how piss poor a lot of GM cars ran with the E-Quadrajets.

Electronic fuel injection is wonderful. From about 1973 to about 1993 cars jsut didn't seem to run as well...and it really only has been in the last few years the OEM's seem to have gotten the tuning down.

Chris

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Almost happened to a V10 Dodge Ram a friend owned in '95 after he got it stuck in a field - somehow we put the fire out.

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Also...remember how piss poor a lot of GM cars ran with the E-Quadrajets.

Electronic fuel injection is wonderful. From about 1973 to about 1993 cars jsut didn't seem to run as well...and it really only has been in the last few years the OEM's seem to have gotten the tuning down.

Chris

Yup.

All that extra plumbing almost guaranteed vacuum leaks.

Seems to me EFI coming on the scene coincided with really stinky cat converter smells...

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How about all the peeling Neons early on?

It wasn't just the Neon. A lot of '90s model Chrysler products suffered from having the worst clear coat possible slapped on. I should post a few pics of what my dad's '99 Dakota SLT looks like. It's a nightmare. The truck only has 90,000 miles on it, but judging from the paint job you would guess twice as much. I don't understand why he hasn't bothered to paint it yet.

Also...remember how piss poor a lot of GM cars ran with the E-Quadrajets.

I could bitch all day long about an e-Quadrajunk. Worst piece of engineering ever devised by GM.

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Not really GM's fault, few of the late carb-fed engines ran well after a little age. All of the add-on junk for emissions ruined them via the hoses and leaks. EFI was a real godsend - cleaned the engine compartments right up.

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I remember people parking cars over leaves during the fall when Catalytic converters first came out. Few cars died by fire that way.

One fire down the street from my grandparetns was rather spectacular.

Chris

Those early converters were a real nightmare - saw a few cars with melted/burned carpet!

And, when they clogged up, all of the cars sounded like vacuum cleaners... whooosh! Whenever the driver hit the gas.

Those poor, choked, engines...

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God, don't I know.

Car I would love to own...tan over a buckskinish interior 1976 Corvette. I've talked about it before, know the guy who owns it, run into him once in awhile in the course of my work.

Car is unique...kind of actually Like the color combo just because its so 1970's. But a chocked mill...hell yes!

Methinks this is sadly why a lot of C3 Corvettes are left to rot. There are 6 (yes six!) later C3 Corvettes rotting behind barns or behind garages or in carports within a mile or so of my house.

The C3 could have been a much better car with the right powertrain. Wish I could go back in time and give GM an LS-3 and the hardware to go with it. THAT would have set the world on fire in 78.

But don't get me started on the C3. 1978 Indy pace car...OMG...LUST!

Sorry for the derail.

Chris

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Chrysler's 'lean-burn' system. My Dad's '79 Power Wagon had a 318 w/ a 2bbl carby...it would stall and flood easily, my left turn phobia came from learning to drive in that truck...accelerate on a left turn was a guaranteed stall..

Silver and dark metallic gray paint on '80s Fords that peeled. 2 years old, 10k miles, my '86 Mustang LX was starting to peel in '88..

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Oh...and one of the rotting cars that sits out 24/7 is a 74 454 Convertible, blue with a white top.

Good thing I don't know the owner...

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Chrysler's 'lean-burn' system. My Dad's '79 Power Wagon had a 318 w/ a 2bbl carby...it would stall and flood easily, my left turn phobia came from learning to drive in that truck...accelerate on a left turn was a guaranteed stall..

Silver and dark metallic gray paint on '80s Fords that peeled. 2 years old, 10k miles, my '86 Mustang LX was starting to peel in '88..

I remember that!

Chris

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As I recall, Chrysler had major ignition problems all through the 70s, not just the "lean-burn" era.

Damp days could kill them.

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Oh...and one of the rotting cars that sits out 24/7 is a 74 454 Convertible, blue with a white top.

Good thing I don't know the owner...

That car is still worth some coin...

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As I recall, Chrysler had major ignition problems all through the 70s, not just the "lean-burn" era.

Damp days could kill them.

Ballast resistors. Never leave home without a couple spare ones. Nothing like having one fail at night on a frozen backroad in the snow. Joy, joy.

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Speaking of EFI, I don't recall my family ever having problems with them...our first EFI cars were the '84 Escort, my '87 Mustang GT, and my folks' '87 Town Car. My '86 Mustang LX (my only car back then w/ a carby) had to have to carb rebuilt twice in the 6 years I had it..

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Ballast resistors. Never leave home without a couple spare ones. Nothing like having one fail at night on a frozen backroad in the snow. Joy, joy.

Haha!

Yeah, I think all of my Chrysler products had one mounted on the firewall.

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As I recall, Chrysler had major ignition problems all through the 70s, not just the "lean-burn" era.

Damp days could kill them.

I remember how profoundly crappy a lot of the Cordobas and so forth ran back then. The owner of the local Chryco dealer was a good "Christian" man who was part of the religous pentecostal type group my mother belonged to. He always felt terrible that he couldn't seem to keep his customers cars from the era running right.

He was a VERY good man who tried to do what he could to help people. We could use a few more like him today.

Chris

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Haha!

Yeah, I think all of my Chrysler products had one mounted on the firewall.

My Dad taught me how to change them. That saved my hide that winter I drove that Dodge Power Wagon. It only had 30k miles in '88, but lots of issues.

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Speaking of EFI, I don't recall my family ever having problems with them...our first EFI cars were the '84 Escort, my '87 Mustang GT, and my folks' '87 Town Car. My '86 Mustang LX (my only car back then w/ a carby) had to have to carb rebuilt twice in the 6 years I had it..

EFI was a real revolution, but not without its own drawbacks.

A dead fuel pump became a "tow event" and an expensive repair.

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EFI was a real revolution, but not without its own drawbacks.

A dead fuel pump became a "tow event" and an expensive repair.

Ya...a dead fuel pump in my '87 Mustang GT required a tow and a drop and drain of the gas tank, since the pump is in the tank.

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Ya...a dead fuel pump in my '87 Mustang GT required a tow and a drop and drain of the gas tank, since the pump is in the tank.

Try that on a pickup, and sometimes removing the bed becomes a good idea.

Still, the trade-off was worth it.

But remote pumps would be nice.

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EFI was a real revolution, but not without its own drawbacks.

A dead fuel pump became a "tow event" and an expensive repair.

Oh yeah.....

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