William Maley

GM News: GM Lays Off 600 Workers At Ingersoll, Ontario Plant, Union Leader Supports NAFTA Renegotiation

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William Maley    410

Workers at General Motors' CAMI plant in Ingersoll, Ontario are reeling from the news this morning that 625 workers will be laid off. This unexpected move comes as the plant will solely focus on production of the new Chevrolet Equinox. Production of the GMC Terrain which had been part of CAMI will move down to Mexico for the 2018 model. Not surprising, officials at Unifor are none too pleased with this.

“I’m shocked, it’s an absolute embarrassment on behalf of GM as far as I’m concerned,” said Mike Van Boekel, chairperson of Unifor Local 88 to London radio station AM980.

"It was previously announced with employees that the next generation GMC Terrain will be produced outside of CAMI. We have confirmed the production location to be Mexico," said GM Canada Corporate and Internal Communications manager Jennifer Wright to CBC News.

GM Spokesman Tom Wickam tells The Detroit News the decision is not because of Terrain production moving down to Mexico, but due to an expected decline in overall production at the plant. But Unifor Local 88 president Dan Borthwick tells CBC News that GM that when the news of the Terrain moving down to Mexico was announced, it was Unifor's understanding that no jobs would be lost.

"Our understanding [was] that we had sufficient production in the future and we would not be incurring any layoffs. Within a week or two weeks we get this horrible news this morning that 600 members would be laid off."

GM disputes this, saying in a statement it "provided Unifor advanced notification of labour impacts related to product changeovers and transition at its CAMI facility."

Nevertheless, Unifor is angry. Unifor President Jerry Dias blasted GM and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) over the layoffs. He called the layoffs as “shining example of everything wrong with NAFTA. It must be re-negotiated. It is imperative that we have trade rules that help ensure good jobs in Canada."

“This decision reeks of corporate greed. It is not based on sales, it is an another example of how good jobs are being shifted out of Canada for cheaper labor in Mexico and Unifor will not let it happen without a fight.”

Dias went on to say that he is all for President Donald Trump's plan to renegotiate NAFTA.

It should be noted that CAMI was not involved in contract negotiations last year as they are covered by a different labor agreement. Negotiations will begin sometime later this for a new labor agreement at CAMI.

Source: AM980, CBC News , The Detroit News, The Truth About Cars


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oldshurst442    1,052
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Nevertheless, Unifor is angry. Unifor President Jerry Dias blasted GM and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) over the layoffs. He called the layoffs as “shining example of everything wrong with NAFTA. It must be re-negotiated. It is imperative that we have trade rules that help ensure good jobs in Canada."

“This decision reeks of corporate greed. It is not based on sales, it is an another example of how good jobs are being shifted out of Canada for cheaper labor in Mexico and Unifor will not let it happen without a fight.”

Dias went on to say that he is all for President Donald Trump's plan to renegotiate NAFTA.

 

HA! HA! HA!

Dias thinks that renegotiating NAFTA with Trump will benefit Canada?

HA! HA! HA!

Dias thinks that talking with Trump about NAFTA who Trump wants jobs BACK INTO the USA will somehow feel sorry for jobless Canadians?

HA! HA! HA!

Dias is one delusional and stupid Canadian!!!

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FordCosworth    128

A Force Federal fed Carbon tax coming...leaving Canada will become " not a surprise. "

I also wonder if Ontario's crazy utility rates had a hand in this? 

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dfelt    1,874

Heavy Socialism and tax's cause jobs to walk!

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daves87rs    352

At first I was angry, but then I realized the problems GM is having with canada's unions. Many issues at hand.

Though I think Mexico was not the answer. Back to the US would have been a smarter choice.

 

I get the feeling GM is going to get burned by doing this...and more than just Trump too...

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FAPTurbo    1,096
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It should be noted that CAMI was not involved in contract negotiations last year as they are covered by a different labor agreement. Negotiations will begin sometime later this for a new labor agreement at CAMI

this has nothing to do with the new usa administration, taxes or government... and everything to do with staking out bargaining positions. 

gm just has a trump card up its sleeve now to squeeze an even better deal out of ontario at the expense of its taxpayers. 

nothing new to see here: gm will ask for millions in federal/provincial money to stay and get it, the union will keep its jobs and canadian taxpayers will continue subsidizing companies who'll march towards automation anyways. 

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daves87rs    352
6 hours ago, FAPTurbo said:

this has nothing to do with the new usa administration, taxes or government... and everything to do with staking out bargaining positions. 

gm just has a trump card up its sleeve now to squeeze an even better deal out of ontario at the expense of its taxpayers. 

nothing new to see here: gm will ask for millions in federal/provincial money to stay and get it, the union will keep its jobs and canadian taxpayers will continue subsidizing companies who'll march towards automation anyways. 

Good chance....

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      Last Sunday night, workers at General Motors' CAMI Assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario went on strike due to the automaker and Unifor Local 88 being unable to reach a tentative agreement. The plant where the majority of the Chevrolet Equinoxes are built has been shut down since. Now the side effects are the strike are beginning to be felt.
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    • By William Maley
      Last Sunday night, workers at General Motors' CAMI Assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario went on strike due to the automaker and Unifor Local 88 being unable to reach a tentative agreement. The plant where the majority of the Chevrolet Equinoxes are built has been shut down since. Now the side effects are the strike are beginning to be felt.
      At least 255 workers at GM's St. Catharines, Ontario plant have been given temporary layoff notices that begin tomorrow. St. Catharines is where the transmissions for the Equinox are built. According to Automotive News, workers spent the week stockpiling transmissions.
      "We supply about 90 per cent of (CAMI's) transmissions, so it's related to that. Even though they were down, we ran all week ... We have a lot of transmissions stockpiled now because we didn't know if they were going to resolve it this week or not. It doesn't look like they're going to," said Tim McKinnon, chairman of Unifor Local 199 that represents St. Catharines.
      “We’re off until they get it settled. Every time they sneeze, we catch a cold. If they pick up more volume, we pick up more volume.”
      GM announced late last week that it is making production adjustments at St. Catharines, Spring Hill, and Flint Engine Operations. Both Spring Hill and Flint provide the engines for the Equinox. Also last week, Canadian supplier Magna International said it would suspend the supply of parts.
      The top concerns for the two sides are very different. For GM, it is the worry of having enough supply of Equnoxes for the demand. Sales rose 85 percent year-over-year in August. While GM does also build the Equinox in San Luis Potosi and Ramos Arizpe, Mexico, the two plants cannot match the output of CAMI (40,017 for the Mexican plants vs. 132,288 for CAMI). For Unifor, they want assurances that CAMI will remain the lead plant for the Equinox and want another product for the plant to build.
      Unifor has reached out to GM on Wednesday on possibly restarting negotiations. At this time, no word on whether two have or will meet.
      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Canadian Press via CBC
    • By William Maley
      Last night, workers at General Motors' CAMI Assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ontario went on strike. GM and Unifor Local 88 - the group that represents about 2,750 workers at the plant - were unable to reach a tentative contract before a deadline of 10:59 P.M. last night. This is the first time since 1996 that Canadian autoworkers went on strike against an automaker.
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      You might be wondering why a strike is taking place in the first place as GM already worked out a deal with Unifor back in September. That's because Unifor members at CAMI are under a different contract than workers at other plants, meaning they were not involved in the negotiations.
      CAMI is home to the Chevrolet Equinox and used to build the GMC Terrain, before being sent down to Mexico. The loss of the Terrain meant 400 workers were laid off, while another 200 workers took early retirement.
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      Source: Automotive News (Subscription Required), The Truth About Cars

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