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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2020 Toyota Tundra TRD Pro CrewMax

      It is old, but still has some tricks.

    The Toyota Tundra holds the title of being the oldest full-size truck, coming in at thirteen years without any sort of redesign. On one hand, this makes the Tundra a very reliable and dependable truck. On the other hand, the Tundra isn’t able to fully compete with the likes GM, Ram, or Ford with their more modern designs and hardware. But there is one exception to this where the Tundra can be a good alternative to the Detroit Three, and it comes in the form of the TRD Pro.

    • Color can do a lot to a vehicle such as making an older model look modern or highlighting some of the polarizing elements of a design. This Army Green paint, which is new on all TRD Pros for 2020 makes the Tundra look younger and a bit more aggressive. 
    • Inside, you can tell that the Tundra is getting up there in age. The design hasn’t changed much and material quality cannot even compare to the likes of GM and Ram’s trucks. But I like the large buttons and knobs for various controls. Not only does it make it easier to find, but it means you can have a set of gloves on and easily control various aspects.
    • One key improvement for 2020 is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto being added to the Tundra’s Entune system, which gives drivers another choice in their infotainment choices.
    • The Crewmax model seen here is huge. Step into the back seat and you might think you entered a limo with an endless amount of head and legroom on offer. I do wish the seats had a little bit more padding.
    • Only one engine is available on the 2020 Tundra; a 5.7L V8 with 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. This is teamed with a six-speed automatic and four-wheel drive.
    • This engine provides plenty of thrust and provides an engine burble that you might expect from one of the Detroit three’s V8 trucks. The automatic is very smooth when changing gear and seems to where it needs to be in any situation.
    • The downside to this V8 is fuel economy. The EPA says TRD Pro CrewMax will return 13 City/17 Highway/14 Combined. I saw an average of 14.2 mpg during my week of a 60/40 mix of highway and city driving. Maybe a couple more gears for the automatic could improve this.
    • Toyota has kitted the Tundra TRD Pro with some serious off-road chops; Fox internal bypass dampers for all four corners, TRD springs that increase wheel travel, and a set of Michelin LTX off-road tires. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a chance to try it off-road. But other reviewers who have taken it off the beaten path report the TRD Pro is very capable. 
    • What I can report is the changes to the suspension makes for a surprisingly comfortable ride.
    • This suspension does mean you will experience a fair amount of body roll when cornering, but that is to be expected with a truck like this.
    • My Tundra TRD Pro CrewMax starts at $52,780. With some accessories and destination, the price climbs $55,020.
    • The Tundra is getting long in the tooth as evidenced by the interior and poor fuel economy from the V8 engine. But the TRD Pro helps freshen the Tundra a bit and makes a compelling option for those who plan on spending more time off the beaten path.

    Disclaimer: Toyota Provided the Tundra, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2020
    Make: Toyota
    Model: Tundra
    Trim: TRD Pro CrewMax
    Engine: 5.7L DOHC 32-Valve i-FORCE V8
    Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, Four-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 381 @ 5,600
    Torque @ RPM: 401 @ 3,600
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 13/17/14
    Curb Weight: N/A
    Location of Manufacture: San Antonio, TX 
    Base Price: $52,780
    As Tested Price: $55,020 (Includes $1,495.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Chrome Tube Steps - $535.00
    Stainless Steel Door Edge Guard - $140.00
    Door Sill Protector - $70.00



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    5 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

    Back on topic, how about the 2020 TRD Pro?

    2020?

    Im still flabbergasted  with the 2012 Tundra towing the Space Shuttle...  I STILL cant contain myself.      :rolleyes:

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    50 minutes ago, oldshurst442 said:

    2020?

    Im still flabbergasted  with the 2012 Tundra towing the Space Shuttle...  I STILL cant contain myself.      :rolleyes:

    Thought that was the 1912 Tundra towing it? 🤔 The truck is just so dated! :P 

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    19 hours ago, Robert Hall said:

    Back on topic, how about the 2020 TRD Pro?   I like the shade of green and how the model name is embossed on the rear fenders rather than a decal... I like the front end, simple and relative clean, not as busy and overwrought as many trucks are today. 

    I like the simplicity.  Definitely will take it over this mess of the front end

    2020-chevrolet-silverado-1500-3-0-liter-

    I do like the looks of the RAM the most though

    Black1.jpg?resize=768,520&ssl=1

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    On 7/25/2020 at 1:08 PM, balthazar said:

    in 2019, the 'coma outsold the GM mid-size pickups by about 93K units.
    It's like the.... corolla of the mid-size truck segment. Doesn't seem to matter how mediocre it is (49 recalls, with a couple years earning a recall about every 3.5 weeks), it keeps finding buyers.

    Not disagreeing with your post but that was not reason for my reply to riviera. They made the statement that Tacoma sales were garbage like the Tundras when they are not, so much so that they sold double the number of Colorado’s last year despite the Colorado being the overall better truck. Brand loyalty 101, much like the F-150 and Silverado outselling RAM even when RAM has had the better truck at times. 
     

    And sorry Balth, but I’m more than happy to show the sheer pile of twenty year old S-10s and first gen Colorado’s that turned to pure $h! since you seem to think that only the Tacoma should face that level of criticisms. Like them or not, they have earned their reputation for being solid trucks with a pretty healthy record in the reliability department. Their high resale values over the years back this up. 

    Edited by surreal1272
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    18 hours ago, balthazar said:

    Pretty boring and very 2010.

    How “exciting” does a pick up need to be? It’s a damn pick up. 

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    On 7/24/2020 at 4:57 PM, riviera74 said:

    Sales of Tundras and Tacomas are also SAD compared to the domestics.  Remember that too.

    BTW: Do modern Tacomas have that frame damage issue that 10-20 year old ones do?

    Tacomas lead the sales of the mid-size trucks...by a pretty good margin. As of Q2, they sold 51k Tacomas and the next closest was the Ranger with 25k units. 

    Q2 Sales.JPG

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    31 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    Not disagreeing with your post but that was not reason for my reply to riviera. They made the statement that Tacoma sales were garbage like the Tundras when they are not, so much so that they sold double the number of Colorado’s last year despite the Colorado being the overall better truck.
    And sorry Balth, but I’m more than happy to show the sheer pile of twenty year old S-10s and first gen Colorado’s that turned to pure $h! since you seem to think that only the Tacoma should face that level of criticisms. Like them or not, they have earned their reputation for being solid trucks with a pretty healthy record in the reliability department.

    No; we agreed : 'coma sales are not poor- they lead the segment. That's inarguable.

    As far as being 'healthy & reliable' - the recalls not only are frequent to the point of sheer annoyance, too many are of a serious nature spilling over into 'unprecedented' territory. The reputation has not yet been tempered by recent reality, but that's a common occurrence.

    My point was not to at all imply the Chevrolet's were better, as much as it was to point out that the toyoters AREN"T. That's the picture that needs adjustment.

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    31 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    How “exciting” does a pick up need to be? It’s a damn pick up. 

    Here : it's boring compared to the other 'unexciting' pickups.

    Look, it's sedans that are unexciting. Cramped, limited capabilities, no advantages over trucks other than parking ability in tight lots.
    Damned pick-ups are overtaking the industry, obviously consumers frequently find them exciting.

    Imagine 2 sedans; one has more power, more cargo & load capacity, towing ability if you need it, the same level of finish & amenities, more levels of individualizing, better crash protection, better vision, stronger built, better resale.... some difference in pricing (but less so than comparing a average sedan to an average EV sedan).... so far which one has you more interested?

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    24 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    No; we agreed : 'coma sales are not poor- they lead the segment. That's inarguable.

    As far as being 'healthy & reliable' - the recalls not only are frequent to the point of sheer annoyance, too many are of a serious nature spilling over into 'unprecedented' territory. The reputation has not yet been tempered by recent reality, but that's a common occurrence.

    My point was not to at all imply the Chevrolet's were better, as much as it was to point out that the toyoters AREN"T. That's the picture that needs adjustment.

    You misread what I said when I mentioned “disagreed”. You also know, as well I do, that recalls do not mean a car or truck is unreliable. Now, specific mechanical or powertrain failures or issues are one thing but thats not what is going on with the Tacoma. 

     

    Your point is still flawed in that even when the average Toyota “isn’t”, it is still more reliable than most of the competition. The average buyer is loyal but not so loyal that they will continue to buy a product if its a pile of $h!.

     

    Just saying, I get that you don’t like Toyota but lets keep this grounded in reality, since the rest of this thread clearly went off into a black hole of historical nonsense.

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    40 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    Here : it's boring compared to the other 'unexciting' pickups.

    Look, it's sedans that are unexciting. Cramped, limited capabilities, no advantages over trucks other than parking ability in tight lots.
    Damned pick-ups are overtaking the industry, obviously consumers frequently find them exciting.

    Imagine 2 sedans; one has more power, more cargo & load capacity, towing ability if you need it, the same level of finish & amenities, more levels of individualizing, better crash protection, better vision, stronger built, better resale.... some difference in pricing (but less so than comparing a average sedan to an average EV sedan).... so far which one has you more interested?

    Fair point but my point is that most trucks are being sold on “sizzle” Instead of function, something the Tundra does not excel at since it hasn’t changed in eons. Now having said that, lets look at some those factors, starting with resale. According to KBB, the Tundra is tops there.

    https://www.kten.com/story/41657657/5-used-trucks-with-the-highest-resale-value

     

    Reliability? You can’t even begging to say that the Tundra isn’t reliable.

     

    As yes, it lags in power because it only offers two engine choices, which is dumb on Toyotas part. However, that 5.7L has more HP than the 5.3L which is a selling point for some buyers. 

     

    The point is, that its not as bad as you think. Yes, it is dated, inside I and out. Yes, it needs more engine choices. However, it is still just a pick up truck, the same as the rest and would perform 100% of the time for 99% of the pick up buyers out there that don’t need a heavy duty truck. As this point though, Toyota either needs to get serious about the Tundra (if it wants it to survive) or just pull the plug and focus solely on the Tacoma. Just my two cents.

     

    Since you brought up recalls earlier though, here’s a comparison for you. 2020 Tundra vs 2020 F-150. Does it still matter?

     

    E345EE23-B1CF-40E3-9A6E-FA0A13CBE1EA.png

    6307F983-6D52-493B-BD9E-983CA70C2863.png

    Edited by surreal1272
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    31 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

    As yes, it lags in power because it only offers two engine choices, which is dumb on Toyotas part. However, that 5.7L has more HP than the 5.3L which is a selling point for some buyers

    There's actually only one engine available. There's no V6. 

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    "Unreliable" is an variably-defined term.

    If the OEM is sending me a letter once a month, telling me I need to repeatedly bring/leave my truck at the dealer for -let's call it- "attention", and it's therefore not waiting in my driveway for me, is it still "reliable"?

    - - - - -
    A recall for a 'missing paragraph in the owner's manual' is less than nothing and zero reflection on the product itself. So (IMO) are recalls centered around aftermarket hood scoops, lamp assemblies, rims/lug nuts. Tho those parts should be tested/passed by the OEM, I acknowledge a degree of risk on any part not directly under OEM manufacturing supervision. Likewise with dealer-level alterations.

    However, I cannot define leaking rears, loss of brakes, broken valve springs, cracking driveshafts, cracking bodywork, seat heater fires, window switch fires, separating ball joints, unintended cruise acceleration, failure of air bags to deploy, broken leaf springs puncturing the fuel tank, etc etc etc as the vehicle still being 'reliable'.

    IMO, "reliable" encompasses [actual reliability of operating condition, breakage of components, and the number/severity of recalls / TSBs] that put my vehicle out of service. There is also a 'comfortable degree of confidence' that's an amorphous component of consumer satisfaction.

    - - - - -
    I only remember 2 recall notices for my 2500HD in the 16 years I've had it; one for the center rear child seat anchor (not applicable to me + my rear seat is totally removed), and the instrument cluster glitch. A SINGLE OCCURRENCE ONLY: I pulled out of a convenience store lot and all gauges went to 0. I shut the truck off & coasted to the side, immediately thinking of oil pressure. Thought about it a moment, decided it was an instrument thing, started the truck & all was fine. That was about 8 years back - never happened again. To me, that's still 100% 'reliability' because there was no operational detriment and no downtime for service.

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    1 hour ago, ccap41 said:

    There's actually only one engine available. There's no V6. 

    You are correct on the V6 but they were offering the 4.6L on the entry level until very recently apparently. They haven’t offered the V6 in years. 

    47 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    "Unreliable" is an variably-defined term.

    If the OEM is sending me a letter once a month, telling me I need to repeatedly bring/leave my truck at the dealer for -let's call it- "attention", and it's therefore not waiting in my driveway for me, is it still "reliable"?

    - - - - -
    A recall for a 'missing paragraph in the owner's manual' is less than nothing and zero reflection on the product itself. So (IMO) are recalls centered around aftermarket hood scoops, lamp assemblies, rims/lug nuts. Tho those parts should be tested/passed by the OEM, I acknowledge a degree of risk on any part not directly under OEM manufacturing supervision. Likewise with dealer-level alterations.

    However, I cannot define leaking rears, loss of brakes, broken valve springs, cracking driveshafts, cracking bodywork, seat heater fires, window switch fires, separating ball joints, unintended cruise acceleration, failure of air bags to deploy, broken leaf springs puncturing the fuel tank, etc etc etc as the vehicle still being 'reliable'.

    IMO, "reliable" encompasses [actual reliability of operating condition, breakage of components, and the number/severity of recalls / TSBs] that put my vehicle out of service. There is also a 'comfortable degree of confidence' that's an amorphous component of consumer satisfaction.

    - - - - -
    I only remember 2 recall notices for my 2500HD in the 16 years I've had it; one for the center rear child seat anchor (not applicable to me + my rear seat is totally removed), and the instrument cluster glitch. A SINGLE OCCURRENCE ONLY: I pulled out of a convenience store lot and all gauges went to 0. I shut the truck off & coasted to the side, immediately thinking of oil pressure. Thought about it a moment, decided it was an instrument thing, started the truck & all was fine. That was about 8 years back - never happened again. To me, that's still 100% 'reliability' because there was no operational detriment and no downtime for service.

    For YOUR truck. Doesn’t mean there weren’t others depending on the VIN. Still doesn’t change what I have said and I stand by it. Overall, both Toyota’s are reliable, end of story. Your one off anecdotal story about your one truck doesn’t change that. 

    Edited by surreal1272
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    It something isn't breaking down on me and whatever the repair is covered while I have a loaner vehicle, it's reliable in my book. 

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    • I wasn't comparing my truck to toyoters, just giving an example of my definition of reliable.

    • Loaner trucks don't happen to work for me- I work out of my truck; all my tools are in there. Not only can't I work, I also have to offload most of my tools for peace-of-mind reasons/security when at the dealer, then reload when it comes back. That s huge inconvenience. Plus, my truck is 150K miles out of warranty, so something breaks it's not covered. I've only had it in for service maybe a half dozen times tho (maintenance work I do myself).

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    Every Truck can break down, some just do it in splendid fashion more than others.

    image.png

    Other just make me wonder how the hell did they get tabs for the dangerous auto to be on the road?

    image.png

    I would for sure NOT buy a used truck from the east coast, midwest or Canada. The amount of salt on the frame makes me nervous of not if but when it will snap.

    image.png

    image.png

    image.png

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    11 hours ago, David said:

    Every Truck can break down, some just do it in splendid fashion more than others.

    Exactly.  Yet every time there is review of Toyota truck, you LOVE posting these old pictures of broken Tacomas.  I live in North East and as I previously mentioned my co-worker had to get rid of his old SIlverado because it was too rusted, he got brand new F-150 and had numerous electrical problems.  My boss had Expedition that he had to get rid of just few weeks ago because it got too rusted to pass inspection and repair was too expensive.

    Tundra might be by far not the best truck compared to others but I heard many times from my co-workers who are "truck people" that they are more reliable in general. 

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    balthazar

    Posted (edited)

    I've never seen a truck with a snapped frame in person.

    My '04 SIlverado has lived it's life in NJ, frame has no major scale, nevermind rot. Should turn 200K miles this week. My 80-yr old Ford spent it's life in NJ and it's frame is excellent- no rot or weak spots, but I have no idea how many miles are on it. It worked a good 35 years tho.

    A buddy scrapped a Chevy pickup maybe 5 years ago when it was too rotted, but it was a 1990 that spent YEARS plowing & salting every winter.

    Edited by balthazar

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    I've never seen a Tacoma or Tundra with a snapped frame in person either but they're apparently happening left and right. 

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    16 hours ago, David said:

    Every Truck can break down, some just do it in splendid fashion more than others.

     

    Other just make me wonder how the hell did they get tabs for the dangerous auto to be on the road?

     

    Some salty states have annual inspections---like Pennsylvania.  Others, like Ohio, have no inspections.  So lots of rusty chud on the roads here.

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    Does Ohio inspect frames annually? I doubt it.

    Jersey had annuals, they never checked the frames here. Cat converter in place is it, underneath.
    But NJ stopped safety inspections some years ago, except for emissions. (Diesels exempt).
    - - - - -
    Was just eyeballin a late '80s Chevy pickup sitting at my buddy's shop. Frame has mild surface rust but no heavy rust or rot showing thru either wheelwell.

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    1 minute ago, balthazar said:

    Does Ohio inspect frames annually? I doubt it.

    Jersey had annuals, they never checked the frames here. Cat converter in place is it, underneath.
    But NJ stopped safety inspections some years ago, except for emissions. (Diesels exempt).
    - - - - -
    Was just eyeballin a late '80s Chevy pickup sitting at my buddy's shop. Frame has mild surface rust but no heavy rust or rot showing thru either wheelwell.

    No, nothing like that...only emissions tests every two years for vehicles going back to '96..and mostly just a check of the codes, gas cap test.   As I said, a lot of rusty stuff still on the roads around here..I remember 40 years ago as a kid Ohio having safety inspections, but that's long gone..

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    ykX

    Posted (edited)

    18 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    Does Ohio inspect frames annually? I doubt it.

    Jersey had annuals, they never checked the frames here. Cat converter in place is it, underneath.
    But NJ stopped safety inspections some years ago, except for emissions. (Diesels exempt).
     

    NJ's inspection is a joke now.  Used to be much better.

    But I work in PA and it seems the inspection here is pretty strict.  It seems among other things they check for rust extensively.

    Edited by ykX
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    Jersey used to sometimes flag you for significant body panel rust, but they never checked structural.

    ykX - when did NJ stop everything but emissions - was it during the recession ‘08-09?

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    44 minutes ago, balthazar said:

    Jersey used to sometimes flag you for significant body panel rust, but they never checked structural.

    ykX - when did NJ stop everything but emissions - was it during the recession ‘08-09?

    Something around that time I believe.  My first car I owned in NJ in the early 2000s, I remember I got rejected for having bad shocks, even though I didn't feel any issues.  They used to check shocks, brakes and other main things, not sure how much they were checking for rust.  I bought new car in 2006 which had few years until the first inspection and I think they already were checking only emissions.

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      Curb Weight: 3,891 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Tahara, Aichi, Japan
      Base Price: $54,505
      Author's Note: Unfortunately, I lost my copy of the window sticker for this particular test vehicle, hence why I don't have the as-tested price or option list for this review.
  • Posts

    • when GM goes under, Hyundai can buy their scraps and continue to sell those new Cadillac EV's without changing the name rather than what Mary's GM wants to do with Cadillac, starve them of new excellent ICE product....develop a couple expensive low volume electric vehicles with "IQ" names and see if that will keep the brand from going under.
    • Whoa, glad to see you back Drew! Aaaaand congrats on the purchase!
    • Krispy Kreme is awful, a mouth full of Lard spilled all over. Had one when it was hot and off the production line, thought it was good, went back to have another out of the box a couple hours later as the family was traveling. Tasted and felt like I would imagine when you try to take a bite out of a pile of cisco lard. Hard pass on donuts. Just do not get the appeal, I imagine for the french they would rather have a croissant than a doughnut. 
    • ^ They shared chassis', not bodies. In '58, Edsel's junior series cars used an overbored version of Ford's 352 V8, measuring 361 CI. But the senior Edsels used a proprietary 410 CI V8. It was '59 that the Edsel got 'corporatized', including offering a I6 from Ford.
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