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William Maley

Quick Review: 2012 Chevrolet Volt

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William Maley    405

William Maley

Staff Writer - CheersandGears.com

July 3, 2012

2011 was a tumultuous year for the Chevrolet Volt: sales didn't meet the high expectations set by General Motors, dealers had problems trying to get them off their lot, and then there was the battery fires which prompted a recall and a congressional hearing.

2012 so far is turning out to be a much better year for the Volt. Currently, the Volt is outselling Chevrolet's other halo car, the Corvette. (7,057 Volts vs. 5,547 Corvettes) and is on track to hit 20,000 units before the end of the year.

gallery_10485_438_514058.png

It seemed like a perfect time to revisit the Volt and wonder if it could reach the 20,000 mark.

Has anything changed since the last time the Volt visited the C&G Garage?

The big news for the 2012 Volt was a price drop to $39,995 (includes a $850 destination charge). To accomplish that, Chevrolet removed some of the standard features for the 2011 model and made them options. If you want your 2012 Volt to be like the 2011 model, you will have to pony up some more money. Also, the 2012 Volt comes with option of Chevrolet's MyLink Infotainment which adds the ability of playing Pandora and Stitcher internet radio. Other than that, the Volt is pretty much the same.

Next: The Exterior & Interior


So, the exterior is the same?

Since its last visit to the Cheers and Gears garage in February 2011, the Volt's exterior hasn't changed much. The front end features a fascia that is integrated well into the hood and front fenders to help improve aerodynamics. Also, the front end features a closed shield grill and projector headlights that extend into the front fenders. The side profile shows off the Volt's aerodynamic shape very well and features a chrome strip running underneath the windows. The Volt's back end is tall and has a squared off shape that is hidden by a spoiler.

And the Interior?

Also unchanged. Stepping into the Volt for the first time feels like you have entered the future. The Volt's instrument cluster says farewell to analog gauges and uses a large LCD screen to display all of the necessary information clearly. The center stack is mostly comprised of capacitive-touch controls that are simple to use, except in direct sunlight where its difficult to figure out which button does what. Sitting on top of the stack is a LCD touchscreen that handles climate, audio, economy information, and the optional navigation system.

gallery_0_438_809922.png

One thing that could upset buyers about the Volt are some of the materials used for the dash. The center stack and certain parts of the interior use hard plastics. Even though the plastics are nicely grained and help cut down on weight, some buyers would expect better quality materials for the price.

As for interior space, the Volt has enough headroom for both front and rear seat passengers. Legroom does come at premium, especially for the back seat passengers due to the placement of the battery.

Next: Powertrain, Fuel Economy, Charging, and Verdict.


What about the powertrain? How does it drive?

The Volt comes equipped with an electric motor delivering 111 kW (149 HP) and 368 lb-ft of torque. The electric power comes from a large 5.5 ft., 435 lb., t-shaped 16-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that is mounted in the middle of the vehicle. The final piece of the Volt's powertrain is a 84 HP 1.4L engine acting as a generator once you deplete the battery, giving you an extra 300 miles.

gallery_0_438_707273.png

Driving the Volt is like driving any other vehicle, albeit with barely any engine noise. Acceleration is very surprising due to low end torque of the electric motor. Getting up to speed on freeway onramps or leaving a stoplight was no problem for the Volt.

The transition from the Volt running on electric power alone, to using the gas engine is very seamless. The only giveaways that the transition has happened are the battery gauge changing to a gas gauge in the gauge screen and the slight hum from the 1.4L engine.

The Volt's handling is very planted, likely due to the placement of the 435 lb. battery. But it's also tuned for comfort, floating along the rough surfaces that dot the Detroit area. If you're expecting a quiet ride, you'll get it under 50 MPH. Over 50 MPH and you'll be able to make out road noise, especially in the back.

Steering also follows the comfort route, feeling light and somewhat "numb".

Fuel Economy?

The EPA rates the Volt at 95 City/93 Highway/94 Combined on EV power and 35 City/40 Highway/37 Combined when the gasoline engine kicks on. My average for the time I had the Volt was around 50 MPG. I'm betting the average would be higher if I had not taken a 100 Mile round-trip on the freeway and the battery only having a 20 Mile charge. Once the battery was depleted and the gas engine kicked in, the averaged dropped from 50 MPG to the low to mid 40's.

If you want the max fuel economy out of your Volt, stay within the 40 Mile EV range.

How long did it take to charge the battery?

Chevrolet says to charge a depleted Volt battery takes about four hours with the 240V charger or ten to twelve hours when using the 120V charger. I matched the ten to twelve hours charge time for a depleted battery. As for when the battery is about halfway used, charging time is about five to six hours.

gallery_10485_438_964194.png

And the verdict?

The Volt appears to have survived its first year with some minor bumps and bruises. The press about the fires and poor sales seem to be going away. In its place are the positives of the Volt; the quietness of the powertrain, extended range provided by the gas engine, and driving like a normal car. Some will balk at the high price and not getting that many luxuries. But with the Volt, you're buying it for the technologies. If you want luxuries, there's the Cadillac ELR coming in 2014.

The Chevrolet Volt solves one of the biggest problems plaguing electric vehicles; range anxiety. And people are beginning to take notice. Can it reach 20,000 sales? The answer looks to be yes.

Before I end this review, I need to make a note about electric vehicles in general. At this present time, electric vehicles aren't quite ready for primetime, but they're getting close. The problems are still price and battery capacity. The Volt might be the best comprise for an electric car, but it still falls into the price problem as other EVs. Electric vehicles are for small audience, despite almost everyone wanting one.

If you really have your heart set on an electric vehicle, be prepared to ask some difficult questions and doing some homework on your driving habits. Because that could make difference owning an electric or making an expensive mistake.

Disclaimer: General Motors provided the vehicle, insurance, and one tank of gas.

Year - 2012

Make - Chevrolet

Model - Volt

Trim - N/A

Engine - 1.4L Four-Cylinder, Voltec Electric Drive System

Driveline - Front Wheel Drive, Automatic

Horsepower @ RPM - 149 HP

Torque @ RPM - 368 @ 0 RPM

Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 95 City/93 Highway/94 Combined (EV Power), 35 City/40 Highway/37 Combined (Range Extender)

Curb Weight - 3781 lbs

Location of Manufacture - Detroit, Michigan

Base Price - $39,145.00

As Tested Price - $44,970.00 (Includes $850.00 Destination Charge)

William Maley is a staff writer for Cheers & Gears. He can be reached at william.maley@cheersandgears.com or you can follow him on twitter at @realmudmonster.

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ocnblu    773

Yes, fair and balanced. Facts are nice.

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dfelt    1,863

Awesome read, Amazing is that last year, the dealerships had volts on the lots in Seattle, but I saw NONE on the road, this week alone, I have seen 3 volts all different color and yesterday on the bus ride home from work saw two more. Could have been the same as I saw earlier, but still 5 volt sitings in a matter of 3 days compared to none up till then does show the car is growing in popularity.

Forgot about the volt I saw on my weekend road trip with the wife. Funny we saw it and then pulled in for gas and at the gas station was a California Licenses prius and they were putting Oil into the engine and Tranny fluid in also. They told me it has been that way ever since they bought it new. Always used fluid but does not leak on the ground, so not sure where it goes, but their toyota dealership could not find any problems, so they just check every time they gas up and they now are approaching 80K miles.

For me, I would have demanded a new car as that one is clearly a lemon.

Back to the volt, we ran into the one that I passed at a winery in Eastern Washington. Owned by a woman who just loves it. She said she gave a fair test drive to both the Volt and the prius as the Nisson Leaf did not meet her needs of being able to go anywhere. The prius was nice but to small inside and she felt the Volt was and now proven as it was her second weekend out on road trips with friends since buying it. There were many people there that looked at the womans car and liked what they saw. To quote one guy. Seems america finally got a good mid size car to compete against those tiny imports.

If people can get this kind of positive, then we will see more people supporting American Made auto's.

GM keep up the drive for Quality built products.

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Yes, Gm keep up the drive!

Saw a red/maroon volt get pulled over bny the Ohio State Highway patrol today...

Glad to see the Volt doing well!

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ocnblu    773

I still don't want one.

  • Upvote 1

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hyperv6    774

I think many fail to remember that the Prius has a slow start up before it became a poster child for the all that must be done to save the planet car.

Now if they can just work on the price I think they will be a much more common sight on the roads.

I see them here nearly daily anymore and I can't say that for the Leaf. In fact I see more ZR1 Vettes around here than Leafs.

In fact this month Zero Leafs and 1 ZL1 Camaro and about a dozen Volts.

While it is not my dream car I could live with one if I had too. It would make a great beat around town car or work car but I would need a Camaro or Vette in the Garage to have some fun. But I would say the same if I owned a Cruze too.

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      If you're a truck manufacturer and have decided to build an off-road special, sooner or later you will be entering it a desert race to prove its merit. Ford and Toyota have done it with their respective models, and soon Chevrolet will be joining this crowd with the Colorado ZR2.
      The truck seen here was developed and built by Hall Racing. Competing in the Best in the Desert’s General Tire “Vegas to Reno” (the longest off-road race in the U.S), the Colorado ZR2 will be in class 7300, reserved for stock mid-size trucks and SUVs. 'Stock' carries a different meaning in racing as the ZR2 has some modifications for the race such as a rollcage, racing seats and harnesses; 44-gallon fuel tank, and additional lighting.
      Otherwise, most of the mechanical bits such as the 3.6L V6, eight-speed automatic, front and rear locking differentials, and the stock wheels. The Multimatic spool valve shocks have been tweaked, but Chevrolet doesn't mention how. The truck will also be acting as test bed for possible new parts for the ZR2 and regular Colorado from Chevrolet Performance.
      Source: Chevrolet
      Press Release is on Page 2


      COLORADO ZR2 MAKES COMPETITION DEBUT IN AMERICA’S LONGEST OFF-ROAD RACE
      Hall Racing to compete in stock-class with ZR2 in Best in the Desert Racing series LAS VEGAS — Chad Hall of Hall Racing will debut a modified 2017 production Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 during Best in the Desert’s General Tire “Vegas to Reno” race presented by FOX.
       “Vegas to Reno,” known as “the longest off-road race in the United States,” begins at 9:30 a.m. on Friday in Las Vegas and ends at various times on Saturday morning, August 19, in Reno, Nevada. More than 350 contestants are expected to participate this year’s 550-mile race.
      The course encompasses a wide array of grueling terrain, from silty desert wallows, to dry lake beds and mountain passes as high as 8,000 ft. above sea level.
      Entered in class 7300, which comprises stock production mid-sized pick-ups and SUVs, Hall Racing’s modifications to their ZR2 include sanctioning body-mandated safety items such as a roll cage, a 44-gallon racing fuel tank and racing seats with safety harnesses. KC HiLites racing lights, two-way radios and a GPS system have also been added.
      The truck retains the stock ZR2’s 3.6L V-6 engine and eight-speed automatic transmission, along with a modified version of ZR2’s Multimatic DSSVTM damper technology.
      In addition to Hall Racing’s alterations, this crew cab ZR2 acts a testbed for Chevy Performance and hints at a range of potential parts to be offered for ZR2 as well as the standard Colorado.
      “The components being tested on this truck are ultimately intended to take the already-exceptional off-road capability of the Colorado to the next level,” said Russ O’Blenes, director, Performance Variants, Parts and Motorsports for General Motors.
      “Racing them allows us to quickly understand their performance attributes and reliability in the extreme environment of off-road racing, ensuring the highest performing components for Colorado customers.”
      Hall Racing, the winningest family of off-road racers in the legendary Baja 1000, has a long history of racing with General Motors production-based vehicles in both Best in the Desert and SCORE desert series.
      “The Colorado ZR2 is one of the most capable production platforms we’ve used as a foundation for our racing program,” said Chad Hall. “The base Colorado is strong and robust with the expected advantages of a midsize package. ZR2 adds great technology, like the Multimatic DSSVTM dampers and the front and rear locking differentials that are vital to stock class desert racing.”
      The 2018 Colorado ZR2 is effectively a segment of one, combining the nimbleness and maneuverability of a midsize pickup with a host of new off-road features and the most off-road technology of any vehicle in its segment.
      Compared to a standard Colorado, the ZR2 features front and rear tracks that have been widened by 3.5 inches and a suspension lifted by two inches. Functional rockers have been added for better performance over rocks and obstacles, and the front and rear bumpers have been modified for better off-road clearance.
      Class-exclusive features include standard front and rear electronic locking differentials, available diesel engine and the first off-road application of Multimatic Dynamic Suspensions Spool Valve (DSSVTM) damper technology.
      As with all Chevrolet trucks, the Colorado ZR2 is built with durability in mind, including a fully boxed frame, roll-formed high-strength steel bed and Duralife brake rotors.

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