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William Maley

Karma News: Revitalized Fisker Aims For Mid-2016 Production Restart

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Since being bought by Chinese auto parts supplier, Wanxiang Group, Fisker Automotive has been quietly ramping back up with a new headquarters in Costa Mesa, CA, and an upcoming factory in Moreno Valley, CA. But one item that has been up in the air is when production of the Karma would restart. Speaking with The Oakland County Register, Fisker's chief marketing officer Jim Taylor said the automaker will relaunch sometime in the middle of 2016.

 

“We want to be out next year. Midyear is our target. That’s what we’ve told the plants and our suppliers, but we won’t make any promises to say this is our launch date, get ready,” said Taylor.

 

There is still a number of items and issues that Fisker has to work on before having vehicles rolling down the production line. At the moment, Fisker is busy hiring people for their headquarters and production facility. Complicating matters are number of delays and no real information as to changes for the model.

 

Source: The Orange County Register


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So end result is expect new / old fisker's to be on sale in 2017 some time at the earliest.

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ما شاء الله

Any way you can post this in English as I cannot even read what it is supposed to say so I can use a language translation program.

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ما شاء الله

 

!!

 

يجب أن تجد القرد اليشم قبل اكتمال القمر القادم.!

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Oh my, isn't that SPECIAL?

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ما شاء الله

و أشعة الشمس والمطر ألم

 

 

Google translate.

 

The King Nedal simply said...JOY!

 

So I just do what I do best. Compliment you with songs and videos.

 

I simply wrote back  "and pain, sunshine and rain"

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Fiskers look amazing. Anything designed by the former head stylist of Aston Martin had better look good. But time marches on, and I fear that this will just be a very nice-looking antique.

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I dont want to admit it...but like you said...time marches on.

This is a design that people lusted after 4-5 years ago.

The only thing that does not make this car obsolete in looks is 2 things:

 

1. it looks soooo damned good even after 4-5 years has passed.

 

2. Its main competitor in the Tesla Model S has not changed in that same time frame one bit.

 

However...its hard to make a comeback when you hit rock bottom. Few succeed.

GM is one of those that has succeeded.

 

And...BMW, although a coupe, has brought another lust worthy competitor to this segment.

And the i8 is just as sexy as the Karma.

Hopefully Fisker does not stumble in the production part like they did the first time around...and I think that is where the battle will be fought this time around again....not in looks, not in technology....but in the quality of the build and everything surrounding the customer/product relationship.

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If Fisker and Musk had been able to work together on a single design it would have been something to see.

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1. So few people have seen one that to most people, it isn't "old news".

2. BMW has been selling the same design for 25 years and it works for them.

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The way I fisker it, this will die again soon.

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