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  • William Maley
    William Maley

    Quick Drive: 2017 Genesis G80 3.8 HTRAC

      Same Car, Different Name

    Over two years ago, I spent some time in then redesigned Hyundai Genesis. Unlike most of the test vehicles that come with everything minus the kitchen sink, the Genesis 3.8 I had was a base model with no options. It would prove to be “a damn fine automobile” as it offered many of items and driving experience you would expect in a luxury vehicle, minus the price tag. Since then, Hyundai has spun off Genesis into its own brand and the vehicle wearing this name has gotten a new one, G80. When it was dropped off for a week’s long evaluation, I had to do a double take since it looked exactly the same as the model I drove back in late 2014. It was only when I looked around and saw changes to the interior and the HTRAC badge on the trunk lid did I realize the wool wasn’t being pulled over my eyes.

    • The name might be the only significant change anyone will be able to point out with the G80, as the rest of it is still much the same as the 2015 Genesis. The only real changes between the two are new a grille insert featuring a radar module and HID headlights.
    • At least the interior is slightly different. Some new trim materials such as matte wood and higher quality leather upholstery help make the G80 become a special place to sit in. That higher quality leather is only available when you order the Ultimate package.
    • One other item the Ultimate package brings is a larger 9.2-inch HD touchscreen with a revamped infotainment system. A handsome, yet simple interface provides one of most user-friendly systems we have ever come across. It doesn’t hurt there are multiple ways of controlling the system such as using the touchscreen, a control knob in the center console, or the redundant buttons on the center stack. A big downside to this system is there is no Apple CarPlay or Android Auto compatibility. If you really want that, you’ll need to skip the Ultimate package and stick with the smaller 8-inch screen. I’m hoping this gets addressed with the 2018 model.
    • Also, would it kill anyone at Genesis to add more USB ports?! There is only one in the entire vehicle which will cause arguments to happen on long trips.
    • Otherwise, a lot of the traits that I liked in the previous Genesis remain in the G80 such as supportive front seats, roomy back seat, and high build quality.
    • Power in my tester comes from a 3.8L V6 engine delivering 311 horsepower and 293 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic routes power to either the rear-wheels or in my case, an optional HTRAC all-wheel drive system. A 5.0L V8 offering up 420 horsepower is available as an option.
    • Despite what the numbers say, the 3.8 doesn’t feel quick. A curb weight of 4,453 lbs for our test vehicle robs a fair amount of the V6’s performance.
    • On the upside, the V6 is very refined with low levels of NVH. The engine also never feels like that it is running out of breath under acceleration.
    • Fuel economy is disappointing with EPA figures of 16 City/25 Highway/19 Combined for the V6 HTRAC model. I saw an average of 20.4 mpg for the week.
    • Genesis didn’t mess with the G80’s suspension tuning which is a very good thing. It still excels at smoothing over bumps and road imperfections. One improvement I would make is adding a little bit noise isolation. There was a fair amount of road noise that came into the cabin.
    • If you’re looking for something exciting to drive in the class, I would say skip the G80. The soft suspension tuning leads to a fair amount of body roll when entering a corner a bit too enthusiastically.
    • The price has crept up since the Genesis became the G80. Compared to the 2015 model I drove with a base price of $38,000, the 2017 G80 starts at $41,400. Add HTRAC and price creeps up to $43,900. Our test G80 3.8 HTRAC with the Premium and Ultimate packages came to an as-tested price of $53,800. Before you have a heart attack on the price, this is quite the value when you take into consideration what you get and the impressive build quality. But I think the best flavor of the G80 is with the Premium package. Skip the HTRAC AWD and you’ll end with a well-equipped luxury model for just a hair over $46,000.
    • While Genesis is still trying to find its place in the luxury class market, the G80 shows that the brand is going in the right direction. Start with a good base and make some slight improvements to it. Yes, the G80 needs to lose some weight to help with the performance of the V6 and fuel economy. But if there anything I have learned with Hyundai and Kia, they are fast learners and make the necessary improvements. I wouldn’t be shocked if Genesis goes the same way.

     

    Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G80, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas

    Year: 2017
    Make: Genesis
    Model: G80
    Trim: 3.8 HTRAC
    Engine: 3.8L DOHC 24-valve V6 with CVVT
    Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
    Horsepower @ RPM: 311 @ 6,000
    Torque @ RPM: 293 @ 5,000
    Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/25/19
    Curb Weight: 4,453 lbs
    Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, South Korea
    Base Price: $43,900
    As Tested Price: $53,800 (Includes $960.00 Destination Charge)

    Options:
    Premium Package - $4,750.00
    Ultimate Package - $4,200.00

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    3 hours ago, riviera74 said:

    Sounds like a really good car at a great value.  Why can't Buick or Lincoln do this?

    GM already has the CTS for midsize RWD luxury. The only thing wrong with that car is the poor execution of CUE. From an engineering standpoint, Cadillac crushes anything Hyundai has to offer. Buick has a very profitable niche of FWD-based luxury. If value and comfort top your priorities list, then you can get a fully loaded Lacrosse with a torque vectoring AWD system in the low $40k range.

    Lincoln... has a laundry list of issues and I'm not going to beat a dead horse. Everyone already agrees the brand needs to go RWD.

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    12 hours ago, riviera74 said:

    Sounds like a really good car at a great value.  Why can't Buick or Lincoln do this?

     

    10 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    Because they don't do rear wheel drive.

    Buick and Lincoln do not need to emulate this 1980's warm over nor do they need to follow the whole RWD thing. FWD and AWD works and has not stopped plenty of people from buying Audi.

    5 minutes ago, riviera74 said:

    No need for AWD for me.  I will take RWD over FWD any day of the week for my next car.  As for CUE, what needs to be fixed to make CUE actually good if not great?

    CUE is good, but can be even better with more responsive touch system and a current nav equal to google or a couple other industry leaders.

    For the most part, CUE works just fine except when you get to non-GM drivers that seem to think CUE should be just like the germans or asians and cannot seem to figure out how to use it.

    Kinda like Apple or Windows. two different interfaces and part of the group is always confused.

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    16 minutes ago, dfelt said:

     

    Buick and Lincoln do not need to emulate this 1980's warm over nor do they need to follow the whole RWD thing. FWD and AWD works and has not stopped plenty of people from buying Audi.

     

    But it has stopped thousands of people from buying a Lincoln.

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    11 hours ago, smk4565 said:

    But it has stopped thousands of people from buying a Lincoln.

    That is not able to be confirmed. Marketing and sales are a fickle thing and without thousands being interviewed and documented that they have refused to buy Lincoln because of being FWD one has a hard time saying that this has stopped people.

    More likely the poorly built auto's, cheap material and fit/finish played a bigger part in people not buying Lincoln.

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    2 hours ago, dfelt said:

    That is not able to be confirmed. Marketing and sales are a fickle thing and without thousands being interviewed and documented that they have refused to buy Lincoln because of being FWD one has a hard time saying that this has stopped people.

    More likely the poorly built auto's, cheap material and fit/finish played a bigger part in people not buying Lincoln.

    Poorly built because they are Fords in disguise.  If they went with their own chassis, own engine, own materials then they would sell more cars.  The market knows they are Fords, thus they look elsewhere.  if they were rear drive they could charge more thus make them not so cheap and sell more.  They could put more horsepower in and sell more, etc.

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    14 hours ago, dfelt said:

     

    Buick and Lincoln do not need to emulate this 1980's warm over nor do they need to follow the whole RWD thing. FWD and AWD works and has not stopped plenty of people from buying Audi.

    CUE is good, but can be even better with more responsive touch system and a current nav equal to google or a couple other industry leaders.

    For the most part, CUE works just fine except when you get to non-GM drivers that seem to think CUE should be just like the germans or asians and cannot seem to figure out how to use it.

    Kinda like Apple or Windows. two different interfaces and part of the group is always confused.


    Disagree with your premise. CUE in the CTS doesn't need a more responsive touch system, it needs more intuitive physical controls. The redesigned layout in the CT6 and XT5 is a step in the right direction, but I heard the mouse pad thing is terrible in execution. Firmware updates might be able to sort that out.

    What bothers me most is Cadillac saw the negative feedback Ford received for capacitive touch systems and doubled down anyway, introducing the original CUE center stack unchanged across the lineup over the course of 3 years. That's just flat out stupid.

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    27 minutes ago, cp-the-nerd said:


    Disagree with your premise. CUE in the CTS doesn't need a more responsive touch system, it needs more intuitive physical controls. The redesigned layout in the CT6 and XT5 is a step in the right direction, but I heard the mouse pad thing is terrible in execution. Firmware updates might be able to sort that out.

    What bothers me most is Cadillac saw the negative feedback Ford received for capacitive touch systems and doubled down anyway, introducing the original CUE center stack unchanged across the lineup over the course of 3 years. That's just flat out stupid.

    And yet myself and @Cmicasa the Great who have put our money where our mouth is do not seem to have the problems so many of you state CUE has. So is this just repeating what other magazines are stating due to a lack of familiarity with the system or what?

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    1 hour ago, dfelt said:

    And yet myself and @Cmicasa the Great who have put our money where our mouth is do not seem to have the problems so many of you state CUE has. So is this just repeating what other magazines are stating due to a lack of familiarity with the system or what?

    Touch interfaces are one of the top consumer complaints in the auto industry. It's a case of you seeing a problem through rose-colored glasses. Cadillac sales don't line up with the impressive quality, performance, and engineering behind them, and CUE almost certainly factors into that.

    For me personally, I really wanted to give the ATS a chance, but it was priced out of contention. I got my Chevy SS for the price Cadillac wants for a mid-level ATS 2.0T with less equipment. Having MyLink with buttons and knobs is certainly a bonus. I'd say that I, too, put my money where my mouth is.

    Edited by cp-the-nerd
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    7 minutes ago, cp-the-nerd said:

    Touch interfaces are one of the top consumer complaints in the auto industry. It's a case of you seeing a problem through rose-colored glasses. Cadillac sales don't line up with the impressive quality, performance, and engineering behind them, and CUE almost certainly factors into that.

    For me personally, I really wanted to give the ATS a chance, but it was priced out of contention. I got my Chevy SS for the price Cadillac wants for a mid-level ATS 2.0T with less equipment. Having MyLink with buttons and knobs is certainly a bonus. I'd say that I, too, put my money where my mouth is.

    I can understand that and respect it. For me, I got my Escalade ESV Platinum edition as it did not seem that much more than a fully loaded Yukon XL Denali edition plus I liked the style and the few features better than the Yukon. 

    With that said, I can also agree with you on the SS over the ATS. I would take one too if I could not afford a CTS-V edition.

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    5 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

    I'm not a fan of capacitive touch controls in any car brand.  You can't operate them with gloves on. 

    So....take the f***ki*ng gloves off, eh?!  :D

    Do it Canadian style while you are at it!

    gloves_medium.gif

     

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    I really like this car.

    2017-Genesis-G80-front.jpg

    There are many of these around in my neck of the woods.

    I havent noticed if they are Hyundai badged or Genesis badged because my level of enthusiasm for them does not go further than "nice car", but I too, feel Genesis is heading in the right direction both in looks, features, fit and finish and marketing.

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    The Genesis is heading in the right direction.  If I were Lexus/Cadillac/MB/BMW, I would be very concerned that Genesis is essentially undercutting them.  Just like Lexus undercut the MB S-Class with the original LS400 in 1990.

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    On 5/16/2017 at 3:35 PM, cp-the-nerd said:

    Touch interfaces are one of the top consumer complaints in the auto industry. It's a case of you seeing a problem through rose-colored glasses. Cadillac sales don't line up with the impressive quality, performance, and engineering behind them, and CUE almost certainly factors into that.

    For me personally, I really wanted to give the ATS a chance, but it was priced out of contention. I got my Chevy SS for the price Cadillac wants for a mid-level ATS 2.0T with less equipment. Having MyLink with buttons and knobs is certainly a bonus. I'd say that I, too, put my money where my mouth is.

    certainly a bonus. I'd say that I, too, put my money where my mouth is.

    People like to bitch about anything that is CHANGE. My father still has a freakin flip phone because of this.. it has buttons. As to consumer complaints.. Fuck em.. I'm all for progress. If turning a knob influences your decision that I would tell them to go for the inferior car. The interface is easy as pie to use. 

    Cadillac sales.. CADILLAC sales have to do with lack of product (CUVs and variants) not the CUE system that even the magazines are now calling "quite good." Initially it had some hiccups in performance.. that is not the case anymore. My V's CUE is just as easy to operate as my MyLink in all the other cars. 

    @Drew Dowdell   like Olds said.. take the gloves off. Anyone with a Cadillac that has CUE should have opted for.. (or is it standard??? I don't kno because it always comes with my cars) HEATED STEERING WHEEL. 

    On 5/17/2017 at 4:38 PM, Sal Collaziano said:

    There's really nothing wrong with the G80 or G90. They're both nice sedans that can be had for a great price...

    They are Hyundais.. and that still says a lot.. about nothing... other than copying other's designs, gobbling them together and acting as if it were original. In Hyubdais defense.. I do kno that they head-hunted Audi designers, but still... that's a BS excuse. Wish they would go out of business. 

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    Wow- why is that center right HVA/C vent upside down?? Friday build date?

     

    Wait- I see; it's the same vent as on the left, but inverted. I've never seen such an in-your-face cut corner.

    Edited by balthazar
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    About the glove argument....

    I was shopping for new gloves this past winter and I noticed that there are big, thick warm gloves good for -40 (Farhenheit or Celsius...same temperature actually) that are touch screen friendly....technology advances in gloves too!

    So...wearing gloves should not be a problem in 2017 for these touch screens...

     

    Let it be known though that I dont like screens of any kind in my cars!

    I think its gimmicky!

    But, since phones and computers and home improvement electronics are this way anywhere from thermostats to alarm system keypads to lighting, to all in one giant touch screen central basepad that uses the smartphone to connect your house and yourself anywhere on the planet to even control your audio equipment and your connected freakin' esspresso machine ....the auto industry just as well follow suit.

    HOME AUTOMATION IS INSANE!!!

    Like I said, cars just as well join in on the fun!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Edited by oldshurst442
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    38 minutes ago, Cmicasa the Great said:

     

    Nicely Stated!

    @oldshurst442 I can respect your dislike of the screens in an auto.

    I on the other hand love them, I love the customization of what info you want and the various ways to present said info. I love having HUD. Once you drive an auto with HUD and custom screens, touch or not, it is very hard to go back to old style traditional manual gauges.

    If you have not test drove an auto like the corvette or any of the cadillac systems with HUD, I encourage you to do so, go through and choose one of the default screens to see the various differences including their old school analog gauge cluster look and still have HUD and I bet you will come to really like it. Pretty freakin cool.

    Course as a computer engineer, I love old to learn from, but preferre newer the better. :D Move forward is always good with tech. :metal: 

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      Options: N/A
    • By William Maley
      Do you need a V8 engine in your flagship luxury sedan? That's a question I posed myself when a Genesis G90 equipped with a 5.0L V8 engine was dropped off for a week. The standard G90 with the twin-turbo V6 offers an impressive amount of performance and refinement. But the V8 offers much more power, along with some extra goodies you cannot get with the V6. 
      Since our last visit with the G90, Genesis has given a bit of a facelift. The front end prominently features a new diamond-shape. I found myself growing to like it, even if I thought it was a tad too large. But I can see this becoming a point of contention. Other changes include new wheels and a restyled rear end that makes the G90 look a bit cleaner. No changes of note for the interior. It still is very luxurious to sit in and the controls are logically laid out. The only item I'm sad not to see is the new 12.3-inch digital cluster that is found in the all-new G80 and GV80. Opting for the Ultimate means back seat passengers get their own screens mounted behind the front seats. This allows you to tap into the G90's infotainment system to play audio, check various information, and look at the navigation system. Ultimate models come with the larger 5.0L V8 producing 420 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is available as an option. The V8 is a bit of a tough sell when compared to the twin-turbo 3.3L V6 as it slower off the line and not as flexible whenever you need to accelerate quickly. Both engines also are similar in terms of refinement, offer a muted engine note. The only place I found the V8 to be slightly better than the V6 was in my average fuel economy. The V8 returned 24.7 mpg, while the V6 only got 20.3 mpg. A combination of the V8 G90 being rear-wheel and not all-wheel, along with more miles being done on the highway likely contributed to the better fuel economy figures. Ride quality is still on the hallmarks of the G90. With the adaptive suspension in either SMART or Comfort, the G90 glides along any road surface with nary a bump or pothole coming inside.  Around bends, the G90 doesn't feel at home with a fair amount of body roll. There is a Sport model to help reduce this, along with adding more weight to the steering. For the as-tested price of $76,695, you are getting quite a lot of equipment. There are LED headlights, Nappa leather upholstery, three-zone climate control, 17-speaker Lexicon audio system, power sunshades, adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, memory settings for seats, and much more. The only way I could recommend the G90 Ultimate is either if you're operating a livery service or just want a V8 engine no matter what. Otherwise, you'll be happy with the G90 Premium and its twin-turbo V6. That said, the current G90 is starting to show its age, especially when compared to some of the new Genesis models such as the G80 and GV80. A new model is coming down the pipeline and if the recent models are any indication, the G90 has a real shot of becoming one of the best luxury sedans. Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G90, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Genesis
      Model: G90
      Trim: 5.0 Ultimate
      Engine: 5.0L GDI V8
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 420 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 383 @ 5,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 16/24/19
      Curb Weight: 4,817 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, Korea
      Base Price: $75,700
      As Tested Price: $76,695 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options: N/A

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Genesis has come a long way since it was spun off to its own brand back in 2015. We have heaped praise on the G80 and G90 sedans, but it needs to be noted that these were badged as Hyundais before becoming Genesis models. The real test would be seeing how an original model stacked up. Our chance came in the fall when a 2020 Genesis G70 3.3T Sport was dropped off for a week. This new entrant into the compact sport luxury sedan appears on paper to have the goods, but how would fare in the real world?
      The Heart & Bones
      Power in this G70 is the optional twin-turbo 3.3L V6 engine providing 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque. This is mated with an eight-speed automatic which routes power to the rear wheels. All-wheel drive is an option. Having some experience with this engine in the Genesis G80 Sport and Kia Stinger GT, I knew this engine would pack quite the punch. Step on the accelerator and the V6 provides a massive wallop of power for any situation needed. The eight-speed automatic delivers rapid and smooth gear changes.
      Where the V6 falls apart is in fuel economy. EPA figures for the G70 3.3T RWD are 17 City/26 Highway/20 Combined. My average for the week landed at a disappointing 19.2 mpg. The standard turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder is better at 22/25/30 with the automatic.
      Handling is where the G70 shines. My 3.3T Sport comes with a couple of extra goodies - an electronically controlled suspension and a set of Michelin Pilot Sport summer tires. On the test route I use to evaluate handling, the G70 felt nicely balanced and provides the driver a big grin when going into a corner. The steering provides the right amount of weight and feels needed for enthusiastic driving. 
      When it comes time to do the daily commute, the G70 surprises here. Turn the drive mode knob into either Comfort or Smart, and the suspension softens up to provide a mostly smooth ride. I do wish the Pilot Sports had a slightly taller sidewall as some bumps do make their way inside. Also, barely any outside noise comes inside.
      Outside In
      While it may share the same bones as the Kia Stinger, I find the G70 a little bit easier on the eyes. Some of this comes down to the G70 being shorter in overall length (about a foot), and wheelbase (around three inches). Details that will catch your eye are gloss black wheels which come as part of the Sport package; the large front grille, and slim headlights.
      The G70's interior is very well done. Genesis' designers were able to craft an interior that not only looks nice but is also very functional. Many of the materials used are some of the best in the class with leather, aluminum, and soft-touch plastics. I also appreciate that the center stack is angled slightly towards the driver, allowing for easier access to the various controls. Speaking of that, there are a fair number of them for the audio, climate control, and other systems - primarily made up of large knobs and buttons. It may lack the minimalist look many are trending towards, but the ease of use cannot be beaten.
      For those sitting up front, Genesis provides a set of supportive sport seats with adjustable bolsters. I found the seats to do an excellent job of holding you in place while driving aggressively, but also providing the support and comfort needed on long trips. The back seat is a different story as there is barely any head and legroom available. The limited legroom also makes entry and exit difficult.
      Another issue with the G70 is the infotainment system. It's the same eight-inch system you'll find in several Hyundai vehicles such as the Kona and Venue, not the one seen in the G80 and G90 sedans. While the system is very easy to use and snappy, it doesn't fit the luxury image that the G70 is portraying. The good news is that the G70 will get a new infotainment system more fitting of its image as part of a refresh for 2022.
      A Threat?
      For a first attempt at the highly competitive luxury sport sedan class, Genesis knocked it out of the park. The G70 provides a triple threat of excellent performance, sharp handling, and a design that stands out. But now comes the big challenge for Genesis; luring buyers from the old guard. If they can do that, then the G70 can lay its mark.
      Cheers:
      Potent Twin-Turbo V6
      Crisp Handling
      Premium Interior
      Jeers:
      Infotainment System Hampers Luxury Ideal
      Cramped Rear Seats
      Fuel Economy Trailing the Pack
      How I Would Order a G70: Basically I would order the vehicle seen here, but in blue. That brings the as-tested price to $51,245.
      Alternatives:
      Kia Stinger GT: The sister model to the G70, the Stinger is more daring in its design with a hatchback shape. This also makes it slightly more practical than the Genesis. Where the G70 clobbers it is in the interior as the Stinger lacks the design and quality of materials. Performance and handling is a dead heat. Alfa Romeo Giulia: The G70's closest competitor when it comes to driving fun. No matter which version you choose, the handling is sublime and the steering is slightly better. I also find the Giulia's looks to be towards the top of the class with an elegant shape. But being an Alfa Romeo, the Giulia's reliability is very questionable.  Disclaimer: Genesis Provided the G70, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2020
      Make: Genesis
      Model: G70
      Trim: 3.3T Sport
      Engine: 3.3L Twin-Turbo GDI V6
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, Rear-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 365 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 376 @ 1,300
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 17/26/20
      Curb Weight: 3,774 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Ulsan, Korea
      Base Price: $44,650.00
      As Tested Price: $51,245.00 (Includes $995.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Prestige Package: $2,850.00
      Elite Package: $1,450.00
      Sport Package: $1,300.00

      View full article
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