Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Z-06

Sequoia gets humped right after its release!!

72 posts in this topic

Linkity

Posted Image

Toyota Changes the Rules in the Full-Size Class — Again <--- :rotflmao: :rotflmao:

Vehicle Tested:

2008 Toyota Sequoia 4dr SUV

First Impressions:

Arguably the most useful, most refined and easiest-to-drive full-size SUV ever built, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia will keep a large family from being forced to adapt to a fleet of Priuses.

During a day in the 2008 Toyota Sequoia, we end up visiting every small town within 100 miles of Raleigh, North Carolina. We're shooting a video of Toyota's redesigned full-size SUV as it motors along in suburban America. But it's easier said than done on roads dotted with housing subdivisions, school buses and even logging trucks.

Finally, with dusk falling, we point the Sequoia back toward the city. We're tired of each other's company after a long day, but as we look around at the cavernous interior of this new full-size Toyota, we remain in agreement on one thing.

The 2008 Toyota Sequoia is still as quiet, comfortable and pleasant to drive as it was eight hours ago. As large, truck-based, eight-passenger SUVs go, this is a good one.

Maybe we shouldn't be surprised. As Motohara Araya, the Sequoia's chief engineer, told us when he described this SUV's mission, "Americans pack everything they need, and usually a little bit more. Within the cabin, they want to be comfortable, safe and well-fed, and require personalized entertainment for all aboard. Most importantly, they are fearless in their attempts to cover as much ground as possible in a single day — and a thousand miles translates to about 14 hours behind the wheel."

This Is Getting Serious

Sold from 2001-'07, the first-generation Toyota Sequoia was a good one, too. But since it was based on the platform of Toyota's downsized Tundra pickup of that time, it wasn't as roomy or powerful as its chief rivals, the Chevrolet Tahoe and Ford Expedition.

Now that there's a full-size platform available from the all-new 2007 Toyota Tundra, the Sequoia has grown to comfier proportions while picking up Tundra's torque-rich 5.7-liter V8, too.

With a wheelbase that's 4.0 inches longer and a track front and rear that's 2.0 inches wider, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia is a bit larger than the Tahoe and about the same size as the Expedition. The Sequoia's cabin has grown noticeably larger, as there's a huge increase in shoulder room and significantly more third-row legroom.

Maximum cargo capacity has declined slightly compared to the previous generation, although this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, because the redesigned Sequoia has a fold-flat third-row seat made possible by a new, independent double-wishbone rear suspension. The second-row seats fold flat, too, so there are now 120 cubic feet for non-human cargo — more than 11 cubic feet more than the Chevy or Ford.

From SR5 to Platinum

There are presently no plans for a Lexus-badged twin of the Sequoia (the upcoming LX 570 is derived from the Land Cruiser), so Toyota has been free to expand the Sequoia range upward. In addition to familiar SR5 and Limited trim levels, there's a new Platinum model loaded with kit you might find on a Lexus.

The company expects 55 percent of buyers to choose the sensible Sequoia SR5, which is outfitted with cloth upholstery and seats for eight, triple-zone automatic climate control, a CD stereo with an auxiliary audio jack, stability control and front and rear side airbags as well as three-row curtain airbags. Another 35 percent will opt for the Limited, which adds front and rear parking sonar, leather upholstery, power seats, upgraded instrumentation and a JBL sound system.

Ten percent will take the Sequoia Platinum like the one we're driving, which has 20-inch alloy wheels instead of 18s, Toyota's driver-adjustable suspension, a power rear liftgate, heated/cooled front seats, second-row captain's chairs (dropping capacity to seven) and a navigation system and backup camera. A rear DVD player is optional across the board, and adaptive cruise control is available on the Platinum.

Fast, Yet Fuel-Efficient — for a Big Truck

Although the Sequoia SR5's standard engine is the familiar 4.7-liter V8 rated at 276 horsepower and 314 pound-feet of torque, it's expected that 90 percent of buyers will choose the 5.7-liter V8 introduced by the new Tundra pickup. The new V8 is optional for the SR5 and standard for other 2008 Toyota Sequoias.

We can't argue with that choice. Not only does the 5.7-liter have impressive specs — 381 hp at 5,600 rpm and 401 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm — it manages to help disguise the second-generation Sequoia's massive weight gain, some 500-600 pounds (depending on the trim level). This big V8 and its six-speed automatic transmission add only 50 more pounds over the 4.7-liter and its five-speed auto.

Toyota claims a two-wheel-drive Sequoia 5.7 will hit 60 mph in 7 seconds flat. After driving around in a fully loaded, four-wheel-drive Platinum model, we believe it. Low-end engine torque is abundant, and passing maneuvers come and go in an instant. Exhaust tuning is quieter for the Sequoia than the Tundra, and it leaves you with the impression that the big V8 isn't even breaking a sweat.

Plus, the six-speed automatic always seems to be on its game with gear selection, something we noticed even while towing a 24-foot boat. We scarcely noticed the load, though with a gross combined weight of 12,565 pounds (against a 17,280-pound GCWR) and flat roads with a speed limit of 55 mph, this wasn't an extreme test.

Buyers have a choice between 2WD and 4WD on every trim. Engaging all four wheels is as simple as twisting a dial. The default torque split sends 60 percent to the rear wheels, but depending on traction, the ratio varies between 30/70 and 50/50. Four-wheel-drive Sequoias again have Toyota's four-wheel traction control system, but we're told it has been reprogrammed to allow more wheelspin in off-road situations.

Fuel economy is not as terrible as you'd think. The 5.7-liter V8 is the more efficient option, thanks to its dual variable valve timing (the 4.7-liter only has variable intake valves) and extra overdrive gear. In 2WD form, the Sequoia has a rating of 14 mpg city/19 mpg highway — second only to the Tahoe (14 mpg/20 mpg). The 4x4 Sequoia's 13 mpg/18 mpg rating is better than all its SUV rivals except GM's two-mode hybrids (20 mpg city/20 mpg highway).

Capable Chassis

Like all SUVs in this class, the Toyota Sequoia uses body-on-frame construction, and just as on the first-gen truck, the 2008 model's frame is fully boxed. It's stiffer, though, and Toyota says it's 70 percent more resistant to bending flex, while lateral and torsional rigidity increase 20 and 30 percent, respectively.

The Sequoia's front suspension remains a double-wishbone design, but the mounts and bushings are new, and wheel travel has been increased. In addition, Toyota has repositioned the antiroll bar and steering rack in front of the wishbones to shrink the Sequoia's turning circle to 39 feet, a reduction of 3 feet. It's a difference we felt immediately on the country roads outside Raleigh, and what could have been three-point turns were simple U-turns.

Even in the firmest (Sport) setting of the three driver-selectable suspension modes, the ride quality of this Sequoia Platinum felt downright luxurious, even with P275/55R20 tires. North Carolina highways are wickedly smooth, though, so we'll reserve final judgment until we conduct a full test.

Our verdict on the Sequoia's handling abilities will also have to wait, but the Platinum we drove was extremely well mannered. The suspension did a beautiful job of managing this SUV's weight around turns, so much so that this 3-ton Toyota reminded us a bit of the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class.

Functional, With Few Flaws

There's only one significant shortcoming in the 2008 Toyota Sequoia's cabin. It has the same audio and navigation controls that are impossible to reach when you're behind the wheel of the new Tundra, which forced us to indulge our driving companion's fondness for 1980s hair bands.

Not only do the second-row seats adjust fore/aft regardless of whether your Sequoia has the 40/20/40 bench or the captain's chairs, we counted 11 separate detents. This allows you to get pretty specific about the amount of legroom allotted to each of the rear rows.

The cupholder count in the Sequoia just might cross the line to insanity. We counted 19 in our Sequoia Platinum. The thought of that much liquid in the vehicle at once makes us shudder.

A Sequoia Instead of a Douglas Fir

The 2008 Toyota Sequoia meets the Tahoe and Expedition on their own terms for interior room and engine size, while setting new standards for performance, handling dynamics and seating flexibility.

Toyota expects to sell 65,000-66,000 Sequoias in 2008. "This puts it back with its best sales year in the past in a segment that's declined quite a bit since then," Brian Smith, Toyota's corporate manager of truck and SUV operations, tells us. For comparison, GM is on pace to sell about three times as many Tahoes and GMC Yukons before 2007 is over.

Pricing won't be released until early December 2007, but Toyota says '08 Sequoias will show up at dealerships in time for Christmas. For people whose needs can only be met by a full-size sport-utility, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia should make a great (big) gift.

Edmunds attended a manufacturer-sponsored event, to which selected members of the press were invited, to facilitate this report.

Edited by smallchevy
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article, like the vehicle it relates to, is pure automotive garbage.

But I would expect Edmunds to go gah-gah over a sombrero-wearing, half-melted Dodge Durango with Down's syndrome.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, some weird details aside, I like it, just like I thought I would. At least it has much better packaging/space/seating than a big GM ute, but then again, so does everyone now.

I think, in that regard, you could call it best...basically because it has the packaging down pat and done well, much like the new Fords, but with better performance and such. But I wouldn't just jump and call it "best ever" already. That is nuts. In a lot of ways, yes. But in a lot of others yet to be seen, maybe not.

Seems like full-size SUV's will always have a place...and after yet another romp around borrowing mom's Suburban, loading it with car doors, a quarter panel, and more, and still cruising down the road in near silence and smooth as could be...I know WHY.

So...now people have another choice, but just stay away from calling one better just because of a name. Only on merits, and that alone.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that there's a full-size platform available from the all-new 2007 Toyota Tundra, the Sequoia has grown to comfier proportions while picking up Tundra's torque-rich 5.7-liter V8, too.

Yeah and we know how the Tundra turned out. I think it might be logical to expect some serious quality issues on the Sequoia much like the Tundra has had.

On a side note, the whole Sequoia design is very, VERY derived. It looks like the designers went on vacation and said, "Ummm, just throw the Tundra front end on there and that should be good."

Edited by Windy-57
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insane that GM can still get grilled for not differentiating the Suburban/Tahoe and the Silverado enough (same in the GMC department), yet Toyo can go and slap a Tundra front on this blob and not even have them mention it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank God it has 19 cup holders!

It is amazing how the same folks who rip GM for their trucks grow so quite when Toyota makes a full size truck or SUV with the same or worse milage.

Some are so two faced.

I guess Al Gore has a new ride to his private jet.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Toyota makes trucks?" In comparison to the Camry, Toyota's trucks have been so far off the radar that the people who complain about SUVs didn't notice them. They do now, and they're starting to get mad. Unlike edmunds, I'm not impressed with the fuel economy, and the GM SUV's do get better economy, even in 4wd.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2008 Toyota Sequoia

Fast, Yet Fuel-Efficient — for a Big Truck

Although the Sequoia SR5's standard engine is the familiar 4.7-liter V8 rated at 276 horsepower and 314 pound-feet of torque, it's expected that 90 percent of buyers will choose the 5.7-liter V8 introduced by the new Tundra pickup. The new V8 is optional for the SR5 and standard for other 2008 Toyota Sequoias.

No full size SUV is fuel efficient. . . with the exception of the Tahoe/Yukon Hybrid IF it truly gets in the 20 mpg range like they are rated. I think that even the gas only powered Yu/hoe will be more efficient than this heap with EITHER engine. Lies. . ALL LIES!

Insane that GM can still get grilled for not differentiating the Suburban/Tahoe and the Silverado enough (same in the GMC department), yet Toyo can go and slap a Tundra front on this blob and not even have them mention it.

Sing it brother! The media needs to get out of the habit of humping Toyota when they are no better than any of the domestics in terms of anything. The playing field has been leveled with the outing of Toyotas issues they tried so hard to hide. :nono:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets compare, shall we:

http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Drive...rticleId=108789

Tundra:

Sold from 2001-'07, the first-generation Toyota Sequoia was a good one, too.

Tahoe:

For "blue state" dwellers here's the bad news on the same subject: GM is still addicted to full-size SUVs! Despite marginal improvements in efficiency, the new Tahoe is an indulgent, thirsty, oversized monster that threatens smaller vehicles while exacerbating America's dependence on imported oil and hastening global warming. So what if it's the best full-size SUV ever built? It's also why the rest of the world hates us.

:)

-RBB

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what I wish GM had done to the Tahoe and Yukon. Let me explain that before I get killed. I like the way the rear door is, well, useable. The Tahoe has unusually small back doors. I don't know if this was done with a longer wheelbase, a smaller engine compartment, or smaller front door. Whatever they did, works.

THe leg room in all rows looks to be larger than the GMs, but since we don't have any measurements, that's hard to say. The fold flat 2nd and 3rd row is also a nice feature.

I'm hoping GM puts the hybrid Tahoe seats in the regular version along with the 6speed. That might be enough to hold it over till the next redo.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a vehicle that is just release, I did not see any documentation other than crapmunds, which gives the fuel economy of the vehicle.

Which means these estimates are preliminary and may not be official. Yet crapmunds goes lengths and bounds talking about it. They call it a first drive even when they actually did not sit in a vehicle, and just add the press release in the write up. Unfortunately, people read the website.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it is easy to compare since we do have measurements for both.

Fullsize	   Cargo Room   Weight  WB   OAL	Width Height	Headroom		  Legroom		 Shoulder room		Hip Room
SUVs		   1st  2nd 3rd								  1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd
Tahoe		  109  60  17  5233  116.0  202.0  79.0  76.9  40.3  38.5  38.2  41.3  39.0  25.4  65.3  65.3  61.7  64.4  60.6  49.1
Sequoia		121  67  19  5680  122.0  205.1  79.9  74.6  39.7  39.4  38.5  42.5  36.4  35.3  66.4  65.6  65.7  62.1  59.9  50.4
Expedition	 108  55  19  5578  119.0  205.8  78.7  76.7  39.6  39.8  38.3  41.2  39.1  37.7  63.2  63.7  51.9  60.2  59.9  50.2
Armada		  97  57  20  5372  123.2  207.7  79.3  77.2  41.0  40.0  35.9  41.8  41.9  32.2  65.0  64.7  63.7  61.4  60.8  48.8
Expedition EL  131  86  43  5928  131.0  220.5  78.7  76.7  39.5  39.7  37.6  41.2  39.1  37.7  63.2  63.7  67.1  60.2  59.9  51.8
Suburban	   137  90  46  5613  130.0  222.4  79.1  76.8  41.1  38.5  38.1  41.3  39.5  34.9  65.3  65.2  64.7  64.4  61.8  49.4
Edited by thegriffon
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually it is easy to compare since we do have measurements for both.

Fullsize	   Cargo Room   Weight  WB   OAL	Width Height	Headroom		  Legroom		 Shoulder room		Hip Room
SUVs		   1st  2nd 3rd								  1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd   1st   2nd   3rd
Tahoe		  109  60  17  5233  116.0  202.0  79.0  76.9  40.3  38.5  38.2  41.3  39.0  25.4  65.3  65.3  61.7  64.4  60.6  49.1
Sequoia		121  67  19  4875  122.0  205.1  79.9  74.6  39.7  39.4  38.5  42.5  36.4  35.3  66.4  65.6  65.7  62.1  59.9  50.4
Expedition	 108  55  19  5578  119.0  205.8  78.7  76.7  39.6  39.8  38.3  41.2  39.1  37.7  63.2  63.7  51.9  60.2  59.9  50.2
Armada		  97  57  20  5372  123.2  207.7  79.3  77.2  41.0  40.0  35.9  41.8  41.9  32.2  65.0  64.7  63.7  61.4  60.8  48.8
Expedition EL  131  86  43  5928  131.0  220.5  78.7  76.7  39.5  39.7  37.6  41.2  39.1  37.7  63.2  63.7  67.1  60.2  59.9  51.8
Suburban	   137  90  46  5613  130.0  222.4  79.1  76.8  41.1  38.5  38.1  41.3  39.5  34.9  65.3  65.2  64.7  64.4  61.8  49.4

Cool! Thanks! That sucks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Review is the softest pile of steaming bulls*** I've ever read

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL

Now, careful there guys...

The import humpers will be coming out of the C&G woodwork soon to tell you that you should be ashamed of your pro-GM bias. And they'll support that theory with half assed rationalizations and demand that you acknowledge how much 'Better' the Tundr, err, I mean Sequoia is than ANY of it's domestic competition, by default.

As for the article.... No big surprise there. I say bring it on! I'm sure the Sequoia will sell in relation to the Tahoe just as the Tundra sells in relation to the Silverado.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First Impressions:

Arguably the most useful, most refined and easiest-to-drive full-size SUV ever built, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia will keep a large family from being forced to adapt to a fleet of Priuses.

LOL. All of this slurping based on ONE day of testing. Had they driven a GM product for one day, we would've been delivered a write up with the required "yes, but" -or- "we'll have to wait and see if it makes a difference"

Funny how they incorporate the Prius into the picture here to connotate this LARGE and wastefull SUV with Toyota's green image. This will be the new wave of Toyota PR; to paint their most inefficient models with green by incorporating the positive consumer image of Prius into the picture.

TRANSLATION OF ABOVE QUOTE: "You don't have to drive a Prius to save the environment, Toyota makes very kind and efficient SUVs as well." and people WILL believe it too, which is sad.

During a day in the 2008 Toyota Sequoia, we end up visiting every small town within 100 miles of Raleigh, North Carolina.

Too bad I didn't know about this... I could've fire bombed the fleet or at the very least thrown a bunch of nails on the highway.

The 2008 Toyota Sequoia is still as quiet, comfortable and pleasant to drive as it was eight hours ago. As large, truck-based, eight-passenger SUVs go, this is a good one.

Umm... Yeah, normally characteristics of machines don't change much... especially in 8 hours. :blink:

Maybe we shouldn't be surprised. As Motohara Araya, the Sequoia's chief engineer, told us when he described this SUV's mission, "Americans pack everything they need, and usually a little bit more.

Backhanded compliment...

Within the cabin, they want to be comfortable, safe and well-fed,

Yet another backhanded compliment.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
they are fearless in their attempts to cover as much ground as possible in a single day — and a thousand miles translates to about 14 hours behind the wheel."
Wow, just wow! Way to play on the mellow dramatic fuel cost issue. Americans are "FEARLESS"; the drive wherever they want regardless. The language strokes the ego of american SUV buyers and paints the company and the SUV in a positive light.
This Is Getting Serious

Not really... 66,000 sales isn't that serious folks.

Sold from 2001-'07, the first-generation Toyota Sequoia was a good one, too.
What a f***in' joke.
But since it was based on the platform of Toyota's downsized Tundra pickup of that time, it wasn't as roomy or powerful as its chief rivals, the Chevrolet Tahoe and Ford Expedition.

Which contradicts the above statement that "[it] was a good one, too."

With a wheelbase that's 4.0 inches longer and a track front and rear that's 2.0 inches wider, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia is a bit larger than the Tahoe and about the same size as the Expedition.
WTF?!?!?! Where are all of the eco-losers now?!?! Why is this article not being painted with the typical green liberal slant that all of Detroit's 'fuel hungry monsters' get served up in?!?!?
The Sequoia's cabin has grown noticeably larger, as there's a huge increase in shoulder room and significantly more third-row legroom.

No effing kidding? I should hope so.

Maximum cargo capacity has declined slightly compared to the previous generation, although this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison,

Why has it declined? GM would be killed for this, but Toyota is 'rationalized' because it basically is a new model ("it isn't an apples to apples comparison) Nothing ever is when it comes to previous generation verses new generation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From SR5 to Platinum

There are presently no plans for a Lexus-badged twin of the Sequoia (the upcoming LX 570 is derived from the Land Cruiser), so Toyota has been free to expand the Sequoia range upward. In addition to familiar SR5 and Limited trim levels, there's a new Platinum model loaded with kit you might find on a Lexus.
Meh.. Toyota, Lexus, they're basically the same thing. (Just an image scam)
Ten percent will take the Sequoia Platinum like the one we're driving, which has 20-inch alloy wheels instead of 18s, Toyota's driver-adjustable suspension, a power rear liftgate, heated/cooled front seats, second-row captain's chairs (dropping capacity to seven) and a navigation system and backup camera. A rear DVD player is optional across the board, and adaptive cruise control is available on the Platinum.

The BLATANT option for those of you with "Escalade envy" and a job in the enviro-whacko or academia field, since those don't pay well enough to afford anything other than a Corolla, or this bad boy once Toyota piles $8-10,000 worth of discounts on it like they have with the Turdra.

Fast, Yet Fuel-Efficient — for a Big Truck
:rolleyes:
Although the Sequoia SR5's standard engine is the familiar 4.7-liter V8 rated at 276 horsepower and 314 pound-feet of torque, it's expected that 90 percent of buyers will choose the 5.7-liter V8 introduced by the new Tundra pickup. The new V8 is optional for the SR5 and standard for other 2008 Toyota Sequoias.

So much for americans and their "desire" for fuel efficiency.

We can't argue with that choice.
Well you sure could argue with the comparative choice in the GMT900s when you all but called would be buyers terrorists for desiring fuel thrirsty SUVs.
Not only does the 5.7-liter have impressive specs — 381 hp at 5,600 rpm and 401 lb-ft at 3,600 rpm —

It also has an impressive defect record, putting it right up there with all those sludgy V6's that consumers got blamed for.

it manages to help disguise the second-generation Sequoia's massive weight gain, some 500-600 pounds (depending on the trim level). This big V8 and its six-speed automatic transmission add only 50 more pounds over the 4.7-liter and its five-speed auto.

Once again, in GM reviews, the cars are called [insert favorite 'fat' slogan of the day] and the writers just 'can't seem to get over the added weight' Yet, in a Toyota review with a pig of an SUV based on their pig of a truck the weight gain is rationalized and barely mentioned.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exhaust tuning is quieter for the Sequoia than the Tundra, and it leaves you with the impression that the big V8 isn't even breaking a sweat.
So you can have a clean conscience about destroying the ozone.
We scarcely noticed the load, though with a gross combined weight of 12,565 pounds (against a 17,280-pound GCWR) and flat roads with a speed limit of 55 mph, this wasn't an extreme test.

1) How can you scarcely notice towing something like that? This isn't a Kenworth, it's a Sequoia. 2) I'm willing to bet that even the ball-free Ridgeline could accomplish a similar feat on a FLAT road at 55 MPH.

Fuel economy is not as terrible as you'd think.
Fuel economy is painted in a positive light as opposed to the typical negative tone received by Detroit. EXAMPLE: "The Tahoe is big and thirsty at XX MPG combined"
In 2WD form, the Sequoia has a rating of 14 mpg city/19 mpg highway — second only to the Tahoe (14 mpg/20 mpg). The 4x4 Sequoia's 13 mpg/18 mpg rating is better than all its SUV rivals except GM's two-mode hybrids (20 mpg city/20 mpg highway).

Pure :bs:

Like all SUVs in this class, the Toyota Sequoia uses body-on-frame construction
Not a negative remark about body-on-frame, instead it's; 'everybody does it'
this 3-ton Toyota reminded us a bit of the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class.

In what way, the constant quality problems?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's only one significant shortcoming in the 2008 Toyota Sequoia's cabin. It has the same audio and navigation controls that are impossible to reach when you're behind the wheel of the new Tundra, which forced us to indulge our driving companion's fondness for 1980s hair bands.

It also suffers from the same cheap, ugly interior as the Tundra. Forgot to mention that, right?

The 2008 Toyota Sequoia meets the Tahoe and Expedition on their own terms for interior room and engine size, while setting new standards for performance, handling dynamics and seating flexibility.

It takes GM 3 generations for them to 'edge ahead' of the competition in the minds of journalists (feable minds, yes, but none the less) yet ONE DAY in a Sequoia in which the drivers didn't even go off road, tow anything for any significant time, haul anything at all OR even push the vehicle remotely to it's limits and they come to THIS conclusion?!?!

Toyota expects to sell 65,000-66,000 Sequoias in 2008.

At an $8,000 each discount naturally.

For comparison, GM is on pace to sell about three times as many Tahoes and GMC Yukons before 2007 is over.

MEANING: GM is still MUCH more evil than Toyota, so don't feel guilty by supporting them. Seriously, why esle would this tdbit be incorporated?

For people whose needs can only be met by a full-size sport-utility, the 2008 Toyota Sequoia should make a great (big) gift.

Maybe they could even do a promotional deal with Spencers who sells the fake turds in a box. I'm sure they'd be happy to wraap this turd up just like they do the smaller ones. Then you can all sit around the fire on christmas morning and joke about the large gag gift you recieved before braving the shoppers the next day to return the thing and go to the Chevy store for the real deal.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BooHoo...the media's killing GM....

Which media is it? The one naming Malibu as an All Star? The almost unanimous positive reviews nationally?

Perhaps the Sequoia is better than the GMT 900's? I really don't know or care if its true, but wouldn't it stand to reason that Toyota has had years to to tear apart, analyze and then respond to the competition, thus enabling them to come up with a good rival?

You guys repeatedly act as if the world should stand still to allow GM to get back on its feet. It just doesn't make sense, nor is it connected to the real world of business...where competitors in all fields consistently attempt to top one another, be it TV sets, widgets or cars.

The sensitivity to GM's 'feelings' is ironic, given the general lack of concern for other insults demonstrated on this board, daily.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BooHoo...the media's killing GM....

Which media is it? The one naming Malibu as an All Star? The almost unanimous positive reviews nationally?

Or the one that RAVED about the GMT900 SUVs? Now there's a newer kid on the block, which looks to be marginally better in many dimensions than the GMT900 trucks, and suddenly it's a media bias? You guys can't do better than that? Really? Then can I claim a GM-bias on the Malibu and previous GMT900 raves?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By early next year Toyota will have 4 models equipped with the 5.7L V8. Pretty good for the world's greenest automaker, eh.

Tundra - 14 / 18 (4wd - 13 / 17)

Sequoia - 15 / 18

Land Cruiser - 13 / 18

GX - 14 / 18 (honorable mention)

LX - 13 / 17 (ratings from 4.7, 5.7 to come out early next year with likely similar ratings).

I don't see why any media would blast GM for their full size SUV's and Trucks, and then praise Toyota's. GM isn't the one trying to uphold a green image.

Edited by siegen
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0