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capriceman

Books -1984 and others

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I know that maybe some of us read but most of the time i love to i just dont find time and i try my best to read alot of books.

Anyway i re-read George Orwells 1984 and totally understand it at a new level. It never ment much to me but I finally understand how and why he wrote it.

You guys have read it right or am i the only one. if you havent read it you should! and i wont ruin it for you unless some people really want to discuss it.

Other great books.

Grapes of Wrath

The great Gatsby

Catcher in the rye- Caufield reminds me of BV in a way for some reason

A Walk in The woods - love it to death

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Bill Bryson is one of my favorite authors, all his books are great in my opinion.

If you liked 1984 or books of a similar vein, try White Noise by Don DeLillo. Very good book.

Edited by Farkas
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brave new world is a really good one as well as lord of the flys. i liked cold mountain as well but i live in that region and have met the author

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i need to read brave new world again i forgot about that one

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1984 is always a source of avid discussion and argument among my friends (Philosophy and History nerds) Lately we've all decided to try to read and discuss "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand. I've decided I'll get around to it when I'm less busy.

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1984 is one of my favorite books, along with The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, both by Ayn Rand.

1984 was way ahead of its time too; the videoscreens and black helicopters predated his era. My favorite part of the book was when he discovered that history book and it described how the world formed into three superstates. And if you look at the world today, the European Union has basically become a superstate, and of course there is the North American Union proposal, which I am against.

There was an article in the UK Daily Mail about how some politician named Brown is pushing to eliminate the names "England" and "Great Britain" from maps, and the English Channel would be renamed "The Channel Sea." An area of land along southern England and northern France will be known as "Manche," with Paris becoming the district capital (over London as well). Then there is the "North Sea Region" that will encompass eastern England, Denmark, Sweden, Belgium, etc. and the "Atlantic Region" which will include western England, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, etc.

I don't get why people over there aren't up in arms over this...it sounds like Britain is losing its soveriegnty to the EU.

Edited by mustang84
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I love philosophical literature, so I'm a big fan of science fiction. Yet I've never read 1984. I should really fix that soon.

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The only one of those I may not have read is "A Walk In The Woods," but it just sounds so familiar, so maybe I have. The others I definitely have, and I love them all except "Catcher." Not a big fan of that one. "Gatsby" is my favorite literary work, though. So amazing on so many levels. Who's your favorite Gatsby character? I find Daisy to be most fascinating/interesting.

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We have always been at war with Eastasia.

English major - heavy reader (Mark Twain is one of my favorite for social commentary). Right now I am heavy into American History, so I am reading books about the founding fathers and the Revolution and Constitution (because in these times, so many people love to distort history about the founding of the country and the men involved).

I just read 1984 again late last year and it as someone has said, Orwell was psychic. Cheney has 1984 is his breast pocket as a "How to" guide.

Kurt Vonnegut's work is also very good and "psychic".

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Books complete the top three list for me with the other two being cars and music.

I can't live without any of them.

I recommend:

Illusions by Richard Bach

Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive by William Gibson

The Alienist by Caleb Carr

Into The Wild by Jon Krakauer

Among many,many others.

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One of the best books is Gulliver's Travels - no kidding. When read against the background of Swift's contemporary Europe, it is a biting political satire, not the kid's story many believe. In his day, you could not openly criticize the Courts of Europe, so he invented fantastic worlds where gigantic people or tiny people existed and then skewered the Kings and Queens of Europe.

I am a big, big reader of SF. Sadly, I threw out my collection of paperbacks (3 bookcases full) when I moved 18 months ago. I've ready virtually everything by Niven, Asimov and Heinlein, of course. An old, old book called The Earth Abides (written in '47, I think) was one of the earlier masterpieces, IMO. A great post-apocalyptic book about a man trying to resurrect Modern civilization after a plague wipes out 99% of the world's population.

I blame everything on John Wyndham's The Crysalids: the first book I ever read without a teacher holding a gun to my head. After that, I read the Kraken Awakes, then in the summer of '74 started devouring the SF section in my localy library. In fact, I enjoyed tackling my grade 12 teacher a couple years later, who argued that SF was not serious writing at all.

Unfortunately, I don't have time to read like I used to. I spend too much :censored: time on the internet or working.

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An old, old book called The Earth Abides (written in '47, I think) was one of the earlier masterpieces, IMO. A great post-apocalyptic book about a man trying to resurrect Modern civilization after a plague wipes out 99% of the world's population.

Hmm, that's probably where Stephen King got his inspiration for The Stand, another one of my favorites. It sounds like basically the same concept, except King introduces a "good" civilization that forms in Boulder and an "evil" civilization headquartered in Las Vegas and armed with all the old leftover nuclear missiles.

Edited by mustang84
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Hmm, that's probably where Stephen King got his inspiration for The Stand, another one of my favorites. It sounds like basically the same concept, except King introduces a "good" civilization that forms in Boulder and an "evil" civilization headquartered in Las Vegas and armed with all the old leftover nuclear missiles.

The Stand is King's masterpiece.

"The trashcan man" is a memorable character that pushed the boundaries.

Carbiz: "the Last Question" by Asimov is the best short story I have ever read. I first read it in about 5th or 6th grade and it has affected my thinking ever since.

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i was always a reader, and between 8th grade and 10th grade, i read James Patterson and other detective novels like that religiously... i gotta start reading again :scratchchin:

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Hmm, that's probably where Stephen King got his inspiration for The Stand, another one of my favorites. It sounds like basically the same concept, except King introduces a "good" civilization that forms in Boulder and an "evil" civilization headquartered in Las Vegas and armed with all the old leftover nuclear missiles.

You have to read The Earth Abides. If you don't have a lump in your throat at the ending (the Last Man on Earth who is 'educated' is piggy-backed on the back of one of his grandsons while what is left of SanFrancisco burns to the ground), then you are not human. This book more than others influenced my own writing (yes, I once fancied myself to be the 'new' Stephen King) and the type of books/movies I enjoy.

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The Stand is King's masterpiece.

"The trashcan man" is a memorable character that pushed the boundaries.

Carbiz: "the Last Question" by Asimov is the best short story I have ever read. I first read it in about 5th or 6th grade and it has affected my thinking ever since.

Agreed. I always enjoyed reading those anti-utopia stories. Made the really think.

Asimov, though had to be one of the best writers in the history of mankind. I picked up one of his nonfiction books, thinking it was fiction and found the entire thing interesting. Been a major fan ever since.

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I'm glad other people here like to read, I thought maybe I was the only one.

I do want to re-read Gullivers travells. Read it as a boy and loved it. Right now I am reading Bleachers by John Grisham and Monkeytown, a novel about the Scopes trials.

Chris

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Agreed. I always enjoyed reading those anti-utopia stories. Made the really think.

Asimov, though had to be one of the best writers in the history of mankind. I picked up one of his nonfiction books, thinking it was fiction and found the entire thing interesting. Been a major fan ever since.

I've re-read the Foundation series about 4 times. (What was he up to? Six books? Seven?) Every time he wrote a new one, I'd have to go back and re-read all the previous ones.

Pick up Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, I think. It spawned 2 or 3 books in the series.

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I think that there are more but here's at least a partial list.

Prelude to Foundation

Foundation

Foundation and Empire.

Second Foundation

Foundation's Edge

Forward the Foundation

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i think i have enough new titles for a year now.

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The thing I've always loved about the anti-utopia stories like The Stand is how the survivors deal with the situation. For example, when the one character was in Maine he had to get gas for his motorcycle from the wells below the pumps since there was no electricity. And they had to search through every house in Boulder to get rid of the bodies so that the city could be inhabitable again. I also liked the part where they talked about how within 20 years or so entire highways would disappear with no maintenance crews to repair them.

King also wrote the book so that it has a very "rustic" feel to it...he often refers to the "old Detroit iron," old Philco radios, and other things that are long since gone. Part of that is because the first version of the book was written in 1978 (and later updated in 1990), but he's great at describing things in his stories. I liked the part in Utah or wherever it was where he went into great detail about push-starting an old abandoned Chevy Nova (or whatever it was).

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The thing I've always loved about the anti-utopia stories like The Stand is how the survivors deal with the situation. For example, when the one character was in Maine he had to get gas for his motorcycle from the wells below the pumps since there was no electricity. And they had to search through every house in Boulder to get rid of the bodies so that the city could be inhabitable again. I also liked the part where they talked about how within 20 years or so entire highways would disappear with no maintenance crews to repair them.

King also wrote the book so that it has a very "rustic" feel to it...he often refers to the "old Detroit iron," old Philco radios, and other things that are long since gone. Part of that is because the first version of the book was written in 1978 (and later updated in 1990), but he's great at describing things in his stories. I liked the part in Utah or wherever it was where he went into great detail about push-starting an old abandoned Chevy Nova (or whatever it was).

Absolutely!

That's how he makes the characters real and the story believeable - it's one of his greatest talents.

In The Shining, he starts the reader off with an old VW bug that has a bad fuel pump!

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