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William Maley

VW News: 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan Isn't Like the Tiguan Sold Elsewhere (It's Longer)

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While Europe has been enjoying the new Volkswagen Tiguan for a few months, North America has had to wait a bit longer for it. Tonight, Volkswagen has unveiled our version of Tiguan.

Why has it taken so long? That's because our Tiguan is a bit different as we get the long-wheelbase variant. Compared to the European-spec model, the North American Tiguan is 10.7 inches longer and rides on a 4.4-inch longer wheelbase. The longer wheelbase allows Volkswagen to shoehorn in a third-row into the vehicle - a plus point for crossover buyers.

If you have spent any time in a Golf, then you'll feel at home in the Tiguan as the layout is similar. Volkswagen's Digital Cockpit - a 12.3-inch screen with reconfigurable gauges - will be optional. Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and a backup camera will come standard. It should be noted the third-row comes standard on front-wheel drive models, while 4Motion all-wheel drive models get it as an option.

Power comes from a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder with 184 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque. This is paired with an eight-speed automatic.

No mention of when the Tiguan would go on sale.

Source: Volkswagen
Press Release is on Page 2


VOLKSWAGEN REVEALS THE ALL-NEW 2018 LONG-WHEELBASE TIGUAN AT THE NORTH AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW

Jan 8, 2017

  • Debut of the long-wheelbase Tiguan, based off the award-winning MQB architecture
  • Longer by 10.7 inches than current model, with an increase in cargo space up to 57 percent
  • Flexible seating for five with sliding second row
  • Third-row seating standard on certain trims and optional across lineup
  • Available driver assistance technology includes: ACC, Front Assist with Pedestrian Monitoring, Blind Spot Monitor with Rear Traffic Alert and Lane Assist
  • Available Volkswagen Digital Cockpit allows drivers to reconfigure instrument panel
  • Optional 4Motion® with Active Control all-wheel-drive system features four selectable modes
  • Available panoramic sunroof and power tailgate lead long list of available features

Detroit, Mich. – The all-new 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan unveiled today at the North American International Auto Show kicks off a big year for the Volkswagen brand in America. Engineered specifically to meet the needs of American customers, the all-new Tiguan builds on the current vehicle’s fun to drive character and adds a more sophisticated and spacious interior, flexible seating and high-tech infotainment and driver assistance features.

“The new Tiguan demonstrates how we plan to give American customers the usability and versatility they demand without sacrificing style or Volkswagen’s trademark driving dynamics,“ said Hinrich J. Woebcken, CEO of the North American Region, Volkswagen. “Every detail of the Tiguan has been thoughtfully engineered for our U.S. customers to maximize space and convenience, while retaining its performance, agility, and value. We plan to price Tiguan very competitively with other compact SUVs. With the brand-new Tiguan and the all-new Atlas, 2017 is the year of #SUVW.”

As with the Atlas, the Tiguan is based on Volkswagen’s Modular Transverse Matrix (MQB) architecture. Compared with the current model, the new Tiguan has far more interior space; at 185.2 inches long, the 2018 model is a stunning 10.7 inches longer than the current version and has up to 57 percent more cargo capacity. The 109.9-inch wheelbase—4.4 inches longer than the new Tiguan sold in Europe—provides both sliding second-row seats and an optional third row.

On the outside, the all-new Tiguan adopts Volkswagen’s clean and timeless design DNA. The MQB platform allows for a wider, lower stance, while the exterior design of sharper, stronger character lines, and LED lighting has already garnered several European design awards. The exterior design also enhances the Tiguan’s utility, from a 26-degree approach angle for off-roading to a lower lift-in height for the tailgate.

The Tiguan’s interior has been rethought and refreshed; even the cloth seats of entry models now feature a rhombus pattern that offers a premium look. The Tiguan now features the optional Volkswagen Digital Cockpit display, offering drivers a reconfigurable display of key data and the ability to position navigation data front and center for easy viewing. The available Volkswagen Car-Net® system provides a suite of connected vehicle services, including standard App-Connect technology that offers compatible smartphone integration with the three major platforms—Apple CarPlay™, Android Auto™ and MirrorLink®.  The new Tiguan also offers an available Fender® Premium Audio System.

To meet the demands of American SUV drivers, the Tiguan now offers a comprehensive suite of driver assistance technology. A rearview camera comes standard and available features include: Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), upgraded for use in stop and go traffic; Forward Collision Warning and Autonomous Emergency Braking (Front Assist) with Pedestrian Monitoring; Blind Spot Monitor with Rear Traffic Alert; and Lane Departure Warning (Lane Assist), which actively helps the driver steer the car back into its lane should the vehicle start drifting into another lane without using the turn signal.

In addition, the 2018 Tiguan offers a combination of both passive and active safety systems that are engineered to meet or exceed current crash regulations. These systems include the class exclusive Automatic Post-Collision Braking System.

A new palate of exterior and interior colors combine with key available comfort options such as eight-way power driver’s seat, heated front seats, and a heated steering wheel. The second-row bench can slide seven inches fore and aft and be split 40:20:40. The third-row seats will come standard on front-wheel-drive models and be optional on all-wheel-drive versions. An available panoramic sunroof lightens the entire interior space, while the foot-activated power liftgate makes the cargo space more accessible than ever.

The new Tiguan will be powered by an updated version of Volkswagen’s 2.0-liter turbocharged and direct injection TSI® engine, making 184 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque, driving the front wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission. Optional 4Motion with Active Control all-wheel-drive offers four driver selectable modes to maximize driving enjoyment and grip, on pavement or off.  


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I for one do not like the Golf, so that is a no go for me as this will be. Plus what is up with the underpowered engine? For a 3 row seat CUV, it should have more power.

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Sticks with their simple theme.....and the classic look really never goes out of style.....

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I like this, it looks strong and conservative... however I think the third row will be a joke.  We should have the option of the shorter body here in the US.  And TDi.

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4 hours ago, ocnblu said:

I like this, it looks strong and conservative... however I think the third row will be a joke.  We should have the option of the shorter body here in the US.  And TDi.

Agreed, though I think i actually like the style of the long wheelbase version more than I thought I would.  

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Not giving us the SWB model is a questionable oversight. With CUV sales being so strong, they need as many options in play as possible. Especially since the Touareg isn't long for this world. If there's not going to be a smaller variant, they had better get on a new sub-compact entry stat.  

 

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I think they right sized this as the Tiguan was tiny for the price they were charging for it.  Now I think they need a smaller than Tiguan crossover below this, with Atlas and Toureg they'd have 4, if Toureg goes away they'd still have 3.  And that is what sells, no one is buying Passats, even the Jetta seems to have slipped away and been forgotten about.  The Golf line is the only car line they have that does well.

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dumpy looking from the side proportion, but not deal breaker so.

This is sort of a half ass effort but its effective since now people will come into a VW showroom again looking for something people actually want in numbers.

this can help VW move on from the diesel scandal.

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