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William Maley

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Brings Back An Iconic Nameplate for A Crossover: Comments

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Mitsubishi has revealed their showing for the Geneva Motor Show today called the Eclipse Cross. Yes, the Eclipse name which is best known for Mitsubishi's iconic sports coupe from the early 90's has returned for a crossover. 

The Eclipse Cross might be the most stylish vehicle to come out of Mitsubishi in quite awhile. The front end is similar to the Outlander crossover with the distinctive grille, narrow headlights, and a chiseled bumper. The rest of the Ecllipse Cross' design is cribbed from the XR-PHEV II Concept from a few years back - raked rear hatch and a crease running along the side. The Eclipse Cross will slot between the Outlander and Outlander Sport. It should be noted that the Outlander Sport is within an inch or two of the Eclipse Cross in overall size - something that will be addressed when the a new and smaller Outlander Sport is introduced. The interior features a uniquely styled center stack with an infotainment screen on top. There also appears to be a pop-up screen for the heads-up display - something akin to Mazda.

In Europe, the Eclipse Cross will be available with two engines; a turbocharged 1.5L four-cylinder and a 2.2L turbodiesel four-cylinder. The 1.5L is connected to a CVT, while the diesel gets an eight-speed automatic. No mention was made as to what engine will come to the U.S., but it would be a safe bet that the 1.5L will be the one. All-wheel drive will be standard for both engines.

Mitsubishi will launch the Eclipse Cross in Europe this fall, with other markets to follow thereafter.

Source: Mitsubishi
Press Release is on Page 2


GLOBAL PREMIERE OF MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE CROSS AT THE GENEVA INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SHOW 2017

CIRENCESTER – Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) will debut the all-new Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross at the 87th Geneva International Motor Show on 7 March 2017 (Hall 2, 10:15 UK Time).

The all-new Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross will join MMC’s global line-up of 4X4 and SUV vehicles - including the Mitsubishi ASX compact SUV, Outlander mid-size SUVs – and is due to go sale in the UK early in 2018.

The Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross will compete in the C-SUV segment and will appeal to style-conscious drivers its sharp coupé looks and muscular SUV stance, as well as its advanced levels of connectivity and all-wheel control technology which delivers an enjoyable, reassuring feel that elevates the driving experience.

Characteristic Dynamic Design

The sharp and dynamic Mitsubishi SUV coupe form is distinguished by its wedge profile with its bold beltline and strong character line; a forward raked rear window; the sharply truncated rear gate and short overhang; and muscular wings that contribute to an athletic appearance.

The front design of the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross features MMC’s trademark Dynamic Shield concept, which refers to the protective shield shape visually formed by the black central area and highlighted by bold brightwork on either side of the grill. Distinctive auxiliary lamps are recessed deep in the front fascia adding drama and sophistication to the SUV’s front-on appearance.

At the rear, the high-mounted, stretched rear lamps divide the rear window into eye-catching upper and lower segments and when illuminated the tubular LED and central LED brake lights form a single bar of light running across the tail, giving the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross a broad and unmistakable appearance from the rear.

The Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross also heralds the arrival of a new red body colour. The standard coating is layered with semi-transparent red and clear coating, and this creates high levels of colour saturation with a highly-refined finish.

Inside, the new SUV’s dashboard is shaped using horizontal lines, with silver metal frames and a black and silver monotone color scheme helping create a sense of refinement that is both dynamic and sporty. With its table-like infotainment display and new Head Up Display, the futuristic cockpit inspires a sense of excitement for the driver. For maximum comfort and flexibility, the rear seat features a 60:40 split with long slide-and-recline adjustment.

Connectivity that inspires new adventures

The Eclipse Cross is fitted with the Smartphone Link Display Audio system, a Touchpad Controller and Head Up Display. Together they allow the driver to access different types of information conveniently and safely.

Smartphone Link Display Audio supports Apple CarPlay*1, the smarter, safer way to use your iPhone*1 in the car. The driver can use Siri*4 or the Smartphone Link Display Audio’s touch screen to receive directions optimised for traffic conditions, make and receive calls, access text messages, and listen to music, all in a way that allows them to stay focused on the road. Smartphone Link Display Audio also supports the Android AutoTM*2 which provides voice-controlled operation of Google MapsTM,*2 Google PlayTM*4 music and other apps. The Touchpad Controller can operate audio functions like radio, as well as Apple CarPlay.

Placing the Touchpad Controller in the centre console allows the driver to easily operate the Smartphone Link Display Audio.

The Head Up Display unit makes driving safer by presenting vehicle speed, data from the active safety systems and other necessary information that minimises eye movement and provides instant readability.

Enjoyable and stable driving dynamics with all-wheel control technology

Eclipse Cross uses an electronically-controlled 4WD system that feeds the optimum amount of torque to the rear wheels depending on the driving situation and the road surface. MMC’s Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC) integrated vehicle dynamics control system incorporates brake-activated AYC*3.

The addition of a three-point strut tower brace at the front and the strategic use of structural bonding at the rear in particular have increased body rigidity. The stronger body and detail optimisation of the suspension ensure precise handling and superior vehicle stability.

Eclipse Cross offers two powertrains that deliver an outstanding balance of power, performance and efficiency. The new 1.5-litre direct-injection turbocharged petrol engine is available with a new CVT transmission with 8-speed Sport Mode manual override, while MMC’s proven 2.2-litre common rail direct-injection turbocharged diesel engine is modified specifically for Eclipse Cross is fitted with a new 8-speed automatic transmission.

The new Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross is due to go on sale in the UK early in 2018 with pricing and final UK specification to be announced closer to its on-sale date.


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Yawn, front reminds me of a Boring Honda, Back reminds me of the ugly Aztek. Who the hell thinks up these styles?

Pass! :puke: 

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Well we can bump one from the 15 cars not to buy and add this one.

Here is another mediocre CUV that will get lost in a very large crowd and will under perform due to quality issues and the lack of dealers.

No wonder Gohsn is leaving.

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So this is what vomit inside my mouth tastes like. Oh and pick a different name because this is an insult to a once decent car (the first two gens anyway). 

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20 hours ago, surreal1272 said:

So this is what vomit inside my mouth tastes like. Oh and pick a different name because this is an insult to a once decent car (the first two gens anyway). 

This.  I didn't have an Eclipse, but had 2 91 and 1 92 Talon TSi AWD and using that name here is a disgrace :(

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Just now, Stew said:

This.  I didn't have an Eclipse, but had 2 91 and 1 92 Talon TSi AWD and using that name here is a disgrace :(

I had two 95 Talons (not the TSI sadly) and I agree. Very pathetic. 

  • Upvote 1

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I like it!  Of course, I did own an Aztek once,......

The interior on this thing is pretty bangup.  Sort of Lexusy.

I like the uniqueness and the fastback.

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      Powertrain
      Under the CX-5’s hood is a 2.5L four-cylinder producing 187 horsepower and 186 pound-feet (up one from the 2017 model). Mazda has added cylinder deactivation for the 2018 model that allows the engine to run on just two cylinders to improve fuel efficiency. This is paired with a six-speed automatic and all-wheel drive. For the Tiguan, Volkswagen has dropped in a turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder engine producing 184 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic and all-wheel drive complete the package.
      With a higher torque figure and being available between 1,600 to 4,300 rpm, the Tiguan should leave the CX-5 in the dust. But at the stoplight drag race, the CX-5 bests the Tiguan thanks to a sharper throttle response and a steady stream of power. The Tiguan’s turbo-four gets hit with a double-whammy of turbo-lag and a somewhat confused eight-speed automatic transmission, making it feel anything but eager to get off the line. As speeds climb, the story changes. The Tiguan’s engine feels more willing to get moving whenever you need to make a pass or merge onto a freeway. The CX-5’s engine runs out of steam and you’ll need to really work it to get up to speed at a decent rate.
      Fuel Economy
      The EPA says the 2018 Mazda CX-5 AWD will return 24 City/30 Highway/26 Combined, while the 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan AWD returns 21 City/27 Highway/23 Combined. Both models returned high fuel economy averages; the CX-5 return 28.5 while the Tiguan got 27.3 mpg during my week-long test. Both models were driven on mix of 60 percent city and 40 percent highway.
      Ride & Handling
      When I reviewed the 2017 Mazda CX-5, I said that it carried on the mantle of being a fun-to-drive crossover set by the first-generation. Driving on some of the back roads around Detroit, the CX-5 felt very agile and showed little body roll. The steering provides sharp responses and excellent weighting. The sporting edge does mean a firm ride, allowing some road imperfections to come inside. Not much road or wind noise comes inside.
      Volkswagen took a different approach with the Tiguan’s ride and handling characteristics. On rough roads, the Tiguan provides a very cushioned ride on some of the roughest payment. This soft ride does hurt the Tiguan when cornering as there is slightly more body roll. But that doesn’t make the Tiguan a bad driving crossover. The chassis feels very willing when pushed and the steering provides a direct feel.
      Value
      The 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan SE AWD begins at $30,230. This particular tester came to $31,575 with the optional Habanero Orange Metallic and fog lights. But the 2018 Mazda CX-5 Touring comes with more equipment such as radar cruise control, lane departure warning, 19-inch wheels, LED headlights, and power adjustments for the driver for only $2,175 less than the Tiguan SE’s base price. You can add navigation, Bose audio system, and sunroof as part of $1,200 Preferred Equipment package. When it comes to the midlevel, it is no contest as the CX-5 walks away.
      The script flips however when you put the 2018 CX-5 Grand Touring under the microscope. The AWD version begins at $30,945 and with a few options such as the Soul Red paint and Premium package, the vehicle seen here comes to $34,685. But you can get into the Tiguan SEL AWD that adds adaptive cruise control, power liftgate, and navigation for only $2,295 less than our as-tested CX-5. While the CX-5 does offer more of a premium interior, the larger interior and slightly better infotainment system give the Tiguan a slight edge.
      Verdict
      It feels weird to describe the verdict between the two compact crossovers as a decision to satisfy your desires or needs. The 2018 Mazda CX-5 falls into the former as it boasts a handsome look that very few models can match, luxurious interior, and handling characteristics that make you feel like you’re driving a sports car. As for the Tiguan, it falls in the latter camp by offering a spacious interior, smooth ride, and a better infotainment system. I consider these two to be the best-in-class. But deciding which one is better will ultimately come down to deciding whether to give into your wants or needs.
      Disclaimer: Mazda and Volkswagen Provided the vehicles, Insurance, and One Tank of Gas
      Year: 2018
      Make: Mazda
      Model: CX-5
      Trim: Grand Touring AWD
      Engine: 2.5L DOHC 16-Valve Inline-Four
      Driveline: Six-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 187 @ 6,000
      Torque @ RPM: 186 @4,000
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 24/30/26
      Curb Weight: N/A
      Location of Manufacture: Hiroshima, Japan
      Base Price: $30,945
      As Tested Price: $34,685 (Includes $975.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Premium Package - $1,395.00
      Soul Red Crystal Paint - $595.00
      Illuminated Door Sill Plates - $400.00
      Retractable Cover Cover - $250.00
      Rear Bumper Guard - $125.00
      Year: 2018
      Make: Volkswagen
      Model: Tiguan
      Trim: SE 4Motion
      Engine: 2.0L Turbocharged 16-Valve DOHC TSI Four-Cylinder
      Driveline: Eight-Speed Automatic, All-Wheel Drive
      Horsepower @ RPM: 184 @ 4,400
      Torque @ RPM: 221 @ 1,600
      Fuel Economy: City/Highway/Combined - 21/27/23
      Curb Weight: 3,858 lbs
      Location of Manufacture: Puebla, Mexico
      Base Price: $30,230
      As Tested Price: $31,575 (Includes $900.00 Destination Charge)
      Options:
      Habanero Orange Metallic - $295.00
      Front Fog Lights - $150.00

      View full article
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