LosAngeles

What's your beef with Toyota?

My issue with Toyota is....   76 members have voted

  1. 1. My issue with Toyota is....

    • They are too strong of a threat.
      6
    • They're too conservative/boring.
      26
    • They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer.
      11
    • One word: CAMRY.
      8
    • They play dirty, but make nice with the press and consumers.
      40
    • I don't have a problem with Toyota at all.
      11
    • Other (post about it after voting)
      14

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

228 posts in this topic

Not that it's a bad thing to dislike Toyota, just wanted to know where you stand.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My beef with Toyota mostly involves them not being as great as their reputation makes them out to be.

How many Toyota Cressidas do you still see milling around? How many Cutlass Cierras... or Buick Centurys of the same vintage do you see?

I bet the number of of ~1985 vintage Cressidas + Camrys still running is less than the number of Cutlass Cierras alone.... much less the entire A-body lineup.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're resting on their laurels. They're not innovating as much as other companies their size. They're not coming out with any inspiring features or vehicles. They're putting out the same mediocre crap and they get a pass because of their quality streak in the late '90s / early '00s.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They make mostly unattractive cars and trucks that I have to see everytime I'm out and about.

I didn't have as much of a problem with them when they were making the late '90s Celica, or the Supra.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We own one, and the reliability has been nothing short of 'sucky' .

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no beef with Toyota - they have a range of largely appliance-like cars, but every now and again they do come up with something rather special. The old Celica GT-4 was a great example.

If I had to choose a Toyota today, I'd plump for an Auris SR180 with its 175bhp 2.2 litre turbodiesel good for almost 50mpg (US) at highway speeds.

car_photo_245556_7.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're overrated, and I hate how people always put it as if it's the de facto standard when it comes to buying a car.

And their cars are soul-less. You buy one because you need one, not because you want one.

Edited by ToniCipriani
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Voted:

They're too conservative/boring.

They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer. (This doesn't really make me dislike them, but I prefer American manufacturers.)

They play dirty, but make nice with the press and consumers.

Other: They've forsaken quality for quantity, but still get treated like everything they touch is bulletproof.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Voted:

They're too conservative/boring.

They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer. (This doesn't really make me dislike them, but I prefer American manufacturers.)

They play dirty, but make nice with the press and consumers.

Other: They've forsaken quality for quantity, but still get treated like everything they touch is bulletproof.

"They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer. (This doesn't really make me dislike them, but I prefer American manufacturers.)"

Interesting that you should have the emblem from a German manufacturer included on your avatar! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer. (This doesn't really make me dislike them, but I prefer American manufacturers.)"

Interesting that you should have the emblem from a German manufacturer included on your avatar! :)

They get bonus points for being owned by GM, but I still wish Saturns were built in the US. I remain hopeful for the next gen Astra and at least some of the other rebadges to get built here (I'm still not decided if Mexico is any better than Germany... probably not.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no beef with Toyota.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They get bonus points for being owned by GM, but I still wish Saturns were built in the US. I remain hopeful for the next gen Astra and at least some of the other rebadges to get built here (I'm still not decided if Mexico is any better than Germany... probably not.)

General Motors is indeed Opel's parent company. Opel itself is a German manufacturing company.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toyota was a totally enjoyable face on the automotive landscape in the 80s and 90s, when Celica, Supra, MR2, and Corolla coupe had one saying "who could ask for anything more?"

When they distilled back to their historically conservative ways, I lost interest, and Scion isn't excitement enough to me to replace that.

maybe if I was a big SUV fan, I wouldn't feel as ill...but....

How many Toyota Cressidas do you still see milling around? How many Cutlass Cierras... or Buick Centurys of the same vintage do you see?

I bet the number of of ~1985 vintage Cressidas + Camrys still running is less than the number of Cutlass Cierras alone.... much less the entire A-body lineup.

Let be fair here, and say that Cressida + Camry still only = two nameplates on one brand of car back when "do NOT buy American" hadn't picked up as much steam, versus four brands (with three configurations and two engines each) of A-bodies?

It's probably different in the rest of the country (at least where rusty cancer isn't consuming older cars like water), but here in SoCal, there are still plenty of Cressidas of that vintage. Camrys, not so much, but again, Camrys weren't that popular in the first generation.

"They are an Asian/Japanese manufacturer. (This doesn't really make me dislike them, but I prefer American manufacturers.)"

Interesting that you should have the emblem from a German manufacturer included on your avatar! :)

To me, Adam Opel + Vauxhall = GM of Europe, as Holden = GM of Australia. The brands aren't as "from scratch" as Ford, but neither are Buick, Cadillac, Olds, or Oakland, last time I checked.

The product is all General IMO...the mentality isn't THAT different, and a piece of the profits and glory ultimately goes to Detroit.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They're resting on their laurels. They're not innovating as much as other companies their size. They're not coming out with any inspiring features or vehicles. They're putting out the same mediocre crap and they get a pass because of their quality streak in the late '90s / early '00s.

Exactly what I feel.

Chris

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They get bonus points for being owned by GM, but I still wish Saturns were built in the US. I remain hopeful for the next gen Astra and at least some of the other rebadges to get built here (I'm still not decided if Mexico is any better than Germany... probably not.)

The only small car built here by an American MFG co. is the Cobalt as far as I know.

Civic is Japanese company but built here, Corolla is built at NUMMI in Cali but Japanese company, Hyundai is built in Alabama by Korean Company, Avenger and Sebring are built in Mexico, Focus, HHR, PT, Et all are built in Mexico, Astra is built in Belgium IIRC, GTI/Rabbit is built in Wolfsburg Germany, Scion/Mazda 3/Miata etc. built in Japan...

Suziki, Mitsubishi, Nissan built by evil lords of darkness in the remote rainforests of the Amazon....

Chris

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have no beef with Toyota - they have a range of largely appliance-like cars, but every now and again they do come up with something rather special. The old Celica GT-4 was a great example.

If I had to choose a Toyota today, I'd plump for an Auris SR180 with its 175bhp 2.2 litre turbodiesel good for almost 50mpg (US) at highway speeds.

car_photo_245556_7.jpg

We need small diesel cars here in the states NOW.

Chris

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We need small diesel cars here in the states NOW.

Do we really when diesel's already OVER $4 a gallon?

I say we all get behind hydrogen fuel cell and Coskata's further development of waste as a source for ethanol (to relieve the corn supply)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Toyota is over-rated. (Ever see the service department of a Toyota dealer empty?)

2. Japan is in many ways an closed market.

3. Frankly, I hate the arrogance of certain people who have the audacity to tell me that 'they' buy Japanese cars because 'they' are a certain ethnic group.

I will admit that a lot of my dislike for Japanese cars is largely based on my horror in the early '80s as they started to flood the market with tiny tin cans of crap. Admittedly, Toyota has come a long, long way from the likes of the first generation Tercel and Corolla, but even before I got into the car business, I had a strong dislike of the ugly little tin boxes polluting the roadways around here. It didn't help any when I was studying international trade at university that I began to dig into the shenanigans that Japan Inc was (and continues to) pulling.

However, times change and I have come to realize that there is more to life than driving the highways in a 220" monster, so I've made my peace with small cars.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Toyota was a totally enjoyable face on the automotive landscape in the 80s and 90s, when Celica, Supra, MR2, and Corolla coupe had one saying "who could ask for anything more?"

When they distilled back to their historically conservative ways, I lost interest, and Scion isn't excitement enough to me to replace that.

maybe if I was a big SUV fan, I wouldn't feel as ill...but....

Let be fair here, and say that Cressida + Camry still only = two nameplates on one brand of car back when "do NOT buy American" hadn't picked up as much steam, versus four brands (with three configurations and two engines each) of A-bodies?

It's probably different in the rest of the country (at least where rusty cancer isn't consuming older cars like water), but here in SoCal, there are still plenty of Cressidas of that vintage. Camrys, not so much, but again, Camrys weren't that popular in the first generation.

To me, Adam Opel + Vauxhall = GM of Europe, as Holden = GM of Australia. The brands aren't as "from scratch" as Ford, but neither are Buick, Cadillac, Olds, or Oakland, last time I checked.

The product is all General IMO...the mentality isn't THAT different, and a piece of the profits and glory ultimately goes to Detroit.

"To me, Adam Opel + Vauxhall = GM of Europe, as Holden = GM of Australia. The brands aren't as "from scratch" as Ford, but neither are Buick, Cadillac, Olds, or Oakland, last time I checked."

Adam Opel GmbH, Holden Limited and Vauxhall Motors Limited are separate legal entities, each incorporated and registered in different countries and each Articled as such. Each is legally obliged to conform to company law in those countries, each has duties to draw up financial statements in those countries and be audited as private limited companies. Each one is a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Motors, meaning that General Motors has liability of ownership to the amount paid up on the issued ordinary shares it owns in each company.

In the United States, Saturn Corporation is also a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Motors in the same way. Chevrolet, Pontiac, Hummer, Cadillac, Buick and GMC are not separate legal entities as is the case with Saturn; they are merely owned brand-names of GM and have no separate legal status under company law.

When a company is first registered in a particular country, Articles of Association are drawn up which is essentially a document setting out the legal guidelines that company has to follow. It also states where the company is legally registered - in other words, its domiciliary. That domiciliary does not change if the company is subsequently bought by another company. As such, Opel is German, Holden is Australian, and Vauxhall is British. A company's domicile can be moved to another country, but this is rare and only usually occurs in companies in financial fields looking to gain tax advantages by moving a domicile to a legal tax haven, such as the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands.

GM Europe is essentially an international division or cost centre set up by GM in 1978, to look after the activities of Vauxhall and Opel, and latterly Saab, from design and development of new products right down to dealership franchising. It is also responsible for the overseeing of Holden products and those of GM's North American operations, which it subs out to Kroymanns, a Dutch-based importer.

There is no guarantee that any profit from Holden, Opel or Vauxhall goes to Detroit. First and foremost, profit can only be extracted via intercompany charges and via dividends - and the laws governing those can vary dependent upon where the subsidiary is registered. Universally, a dividend can only be paid out of post-tax profits and is subject to income/corporation tax on the parent company; intercompany charges are not usually wholly tax relievable to the subsidiary and often subject to limits set out in agreements with taxing authorities. In addition, GM itself is a public company, and investors will be wary of copious dividends being extracted from subsidiary companies leaving fewer reserves in those subsidiaries for future expansion, growth and capital expenditure. That can be construed as a sign that a sale of the subsidiary or a contraction of activities within the group is on the cards.

Edited by aatbloke
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small cars don't have to be ugly tim boxes though. Look at the Astra, which is really a cool little car.

Personally I think people start driving a particular type of car as teenagers when they learn to drive, and then stay with that for life. I learned to drive on a manual Dodge Omni and have never really made peace with big cars or automatics FWIW.

As far as the ethnic thing goes...and you'd really hate the asian father of one of my high school friends. He bought an Oldsmobile new in 1967, drove it trouble free until 1994 and then traded it on a Camry because he wanted something "reliable."

Chris

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toyotas are ugly, and just not very good cars. I hate the way the media kisses their ass

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason I dislike Toyota? It is not because they are Japanese, and it is not because I believe them to be some impenetrable fortress that cannot be brought down. Quite frankly, I see them to be a wholly dishonest company with policies that lack morale, a company that can only build cold, soulless abominations that roll on four Good Year tires. I despise what they do and what they make. There is no passion or even honesty in a Toyota product.

Edited by YellowJacket894
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I say we all get behind hydrogen fuel cell and Coskata's further development of waste as a source for ethanol (to relieve the corn supply)

ooo read about that in this months motor trend, thats a fascinating little thing they got going on. only one problem with it, the powers that be wont make a lot of money off that so it'll prolly get downplayed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not enough to time to detail why i fking hate them

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.