Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ocnblu

question for the homeowners

47 posts in this topic

Does anyone have any experience with different types of siding? Sure, aluminum is old-skool, and vinyl is ubiquitous, but what about fiber cement siding? Does anyone have any knowledge of it? Is it expensive, and if so, is it worth it? Does the color stand up to time, or does it have to be painted after a while? Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm considering it for the one house... Aluminum is too expensive and it dents. Vinyl is just cheap and cheap looking, IMHO.

The Cement fiberboard is more than vinyl, but it lasts a long time and looks like a premium material compared to vinyl and aluminum... and it requires painting... but its such a stable product (compared to wood) and with good adhesion (compared to aluminum or vinyl), so the paint lasts a good time. Comes in some nice styles, too.

Unless I'm really low on funds, the house will get fiber cement.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Siding materials come in a variety of textures/styles. You can get simulated shakes, stones, or bricks in addition to the traditional clapboard styles. You don't have to paint any of these, but I beliece they're more than traditional vinyl siding.

Would you be doing the install yourself, or would you contract out?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be contracting out. I was looking at the stuff sold by Lowe's, James Hardie fiber cement. It comes with a 50-year product warranty and a 15-year finish warranty, which, if the stuff is colored through (if it isn't it should be), why the low finish warranty time? I was also looking at Georgia-Pacific Cedar Lane Select vinyl in a Dutch Lap style. The Cedar Lane is thicker than G-P's other vinyls. I am interested in continuing with a maintenance-free exterior.

The vinyl siding on the houses in my development doesn't seem to have been installed correctly. For example, after a wind storm, a piece of siding on the front of my house slides sideways, leaving a gap at a joint. I have to periodically slide it back into position. Isn't vinyl siding supposed to be locked together, preventing movement? I'm no expert, so I'm asking.

If the government subsidizes energy-efficient home improvements in the coming months, I am wondering if wrapping a house and residing it will qualify for help. It's also soon going to be time for a roof. These houses were built circa 1986.

Edited by ocnblu
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The vinyl siding on the houses in my development doesn't seem to have been installed correctly. For example, after a wind storm, a piece of siding on the front of my house slides sideways, leaving a gap at a joint. I have to periodically slide it back into position. Isn't vinyl siding supposed to be locked together, preventing movement? I'm no expert, so I'm asking.

Yeah, its supposed to lock.

Thats only the start with Vinyl... usually I see it installed too tight... and it buckles when it expands. Ugh. Or people BBQ near it and it melts. Whoops.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vinyl and aluminum siding are super cheap, and not in a thrifty way. Go for the cement siding.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aluminum siding : I didn't think they made this anymore. I haven't seen an aluminum-clad house that was newer than, say, the 1970s.

Vinyl siding : there's nothing remotely wrong with vinyl. It's molded in color- no maintenance or paint here. It's cost-effective, and in a thrifty way. A number you can get with form-fitting foam that'll add a bit of R-value and keep the vertical seams tighter.

Yes- it's hung via nails, but the nail holes are usually slots, so I could see a loosely-nailed piece moving horizontally. I have not seen siding that locks together- the nature of installing it in various lengths would seem to prevent that; IDK.

Hardie board is good stuff, but it's relatively expensive, and more expensive to install (takes longer). It holds paint very well (better than wood) but does have to be repainted at intervals. I would think it would have less R-value than foam-backed vinyl, but you'd have to check that.

If I were to build a new house, I would strongly consider cedar clapboard siding. More maintenance & a LOT more $, but I like the look, esp when you can add some detail around the corners & eaves. Too much work to re-paint, tho. Happily, I love the look of a paint-peeling old house, one that looks like a 99 yr old man might have died in, 25 years ago, and no one bothered to check.

Oh; don't forget to consider Insul-Brick, the classiest of siding options.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for a southwestern look with beige stucco and a red tile roof. :) (suburban Phoenix is like that, with varying shades of beige, w/ brown trim).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for a southwestern look with beige stucco and a red tile roof. :) (suburban Phoenix is like that, with varying shades of beige, w/ brown trim).

Hmmm...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm...

Got to admit, it would look distinctive in PA. Not sure if the palm trees and cactus would work in that climate, though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a few of those 'hacienda'-look houses here in Jersey - blorf! And somehow, because it's so far removed from it's native georgraphic area, it comes off as cheesy to me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a few of those 'hacienda'-look houses here in Jersey - blorf! And somehow, because it's so far removed from it's native geographic area, it comes off as cheesy to me.

Yeah, I can understand that. A few blocks for me there is a house designed and trimmed like a Swiss chalet, complete w/ palm trees. Now those look great in the rolling hills of Sugarcreek, Ohio (which has a lot of Swiss style buildings and was settled by Swiss and German immigrants), but in Arizona, a bit strange...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find myself up on the roof at infrequent & impulsive intervals, and I've heard you cannot walk on those clay tiles. I wouldn't like that.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find myself up on the roof at infrequent & impulsive intervals, and I've heard you cannot walk on those clay tiles. I wouldn't like that.

That's probably true..I don't think they are load bearing. My (my sister's) house here has an asphalt shingled roof w/ the A/C on top, newer houses w/ the RTRs have the A/C on the ground, so less need to go on the roof.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A/C on the roof of a residential house ?? This a condo/ townhouse sort of thing ? Weird, otherwise.

-- -- -- -- --

And you are assigning logical reasons to go up on a roof, which eliminates the non-logical, fun reasons. ;)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A/C on the roof of a residential house ?? This a condo/ townhouse sort of thing ? Weird, otherwise.

-- -- -- -- --

And you are assigning logical reasons to go up on a roof, which eliminates the non-logical, fun reasons. ;)

A/C on the roof is very common in Arizona, at least on houses built up into the '80s. Don't know when it became common to put them on the ground. They are set in place w/ a crane... saw my neighbor's new unit installed last spring, a nice little 3.5 ton capacity model, a bit undersized, IMHO (we have a 5 ton one).

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seen plenty of commercial installations on roofs (serviced one, too)- as that keeps them away from the public/damage & most commercial buildings have flat roofs. 10-4 on AZ roofs likely being commonly flat, too. But with the necc pitched roofs here in NJ, no residential rooftop A/C units that I've ever seen.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seen plenty of commercial installations on roofs (serviced one, too)- as that keeps them away from the public/damage & most commercial buildings have flat roofs. 10-4 on AZ roofs likely being commonly flat, too. But with the necc pitched roofs here in NJ, no residential rooftop A/C units that I've ever seen.

Many are flat (esp. the stucco adobe style), but all the roofs in my neighborhood are pitched, so the A/C sits near the peak of the roof on it's own little platform.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fiber Cement Hardie siding is good stuff...my sister used it when she remodeled and the stuff works great.

Chris

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>>"so the A/C sits near the peak of the roof on it's own little platform."<<

I'd be curious to see a typical pic of this, if you are so inclined. Seems like a big waste of money, as far as I can imagine.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>>"so the A/C sits near the peak of the roof on it's own little platform."<<

I'd be curious to see a typical pic of this, if you are so inclined. Seems like a big waste of money, as far as I can imagine.

Given the sustained heat in AZ summers, it's worth every penny. That's apparently the way they built them back in the day..I'll look for a pic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aluminum Siding:

aluminiumsiding1.jpg

Hail%20Aluminum%20Siding%20Damage%201_1249222845.JPG

Do you get hail?

Vinyl Siding:

Siding_DH_3.32691520.jpg

dsc_0001.jpg

This siding melted and warped, even though it was on the shaded east side of the property.

Wood Siding:

cedar-wood-siding-image_qva4.jpg

cars-041-795673.jpg

malibu-beach-house-picture.jpg

Cement Siding:

nichiha.jpg

nichiawithclips007.jpg

fiber-cement-siding4.jpg

fiber-cement-siding.jpg

What I can tell you is this: wood and cement siding have the potential to add the most resale value to your home, with wood having more "character," but cement siding being relatively maintenance-free yet having a much more premium look than vinyl or aluminum.

Personally, I prefer wood, but cement would do...I'd stay away from vinyl or aluminum as they're cheap, and most often look it, too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like wood and brick... I'd really like some rough-hewn stonework, at least on the front of my next house. The cement looks pretty interesting, wasn't aware of such siding.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My house is stone and stucco as I have a tudor style house. The "beams" in the stucco are covered with aluminum flashing.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ductp4.gif

I guess this type of A/C goes right into the duct work rather then having to use an airbox split system like homes with A/Cs on the ground.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Remove formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0