Jump to content
William Maley

Chevrolet News:2016 Chevrolet Volt Gets Rated By the EPA

Recommended Posts

Today, Chevrolet and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have released the numbers for the 2016 Volt and they are noticeably better than the outgoing model.

 

The EPA rates the Volt at 106 Miles Per Gallon Equivalent (MPGe) combined when operating solely on electricity, and 42 MPG combined when the gas engine is running. To put this into perspective, the current Volt gets 98 MPGe when running on electricity and 39 MPG combined when the gas engine is running.

 

Overall electric range has seen a big jump as well with the 2016 Volt. The EPA says the model will deliver 53 Miles of range on electric power alone. That is a huge increase compared to the 39 Miles of total electric range on the current Volt.

 

“We listened to our customers. They were very clear when they told us that they wanted more range, and a fun driving experience behind the wheel. We are confident that the 2016 Volt delivers both,” said Andrew Farah, vehicle chief engineer for the Volt.

 

Source: Chevrolet

 

Press Release is on Page 2






Click here to view the article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

 

 

I know it's 42 combined. A lot of hybrids, especially dedicated ones like the Prius, are higher than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

42mpg combined is what the writeup says. At least I took that as City/Highway/Combined - and the 42 was the "combined".

 

 

I know it's 42 combined. A lot of hybrids, especially dedicated ones like the Prius, are higher than that.

 

Oh I gotcha I gotcha..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Future will be cars like the VOLT and BOLT as the Gov pushes to do away with Petrol auto's. I saw a VOLT gen 1 that had the generator motor converted to run CNG, so pretty clean for an alternative Hybrid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

 

I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

 

i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over in CF we used to have a Volt owner who lived in Toronto. He loved the thing.

My dad would have bought one, closer to when they came out, for my mom. The concept is fantastic. He doesn't want full electric and the range issue, my mom lives 3 miles from her job(never even use gas), but they drive to my sister's in Iowa every couple of months(6hrs one way) or visit my brother at school(2+hrs one way). The only thing that kept him from buying one was the price. He's a very practical man and ran the numbers and it didn't logically make sense with the vehicle price so high still and the unknown of the brand new vehicle. They ended up with a '12 Fusion with the 2.5l.Nice car but I wish they would have held off till the '13's came out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

 

MPG in the Volt is a lot more "your mileage may vary" than standard gas cars.   It greatly depends on the terrain and driving style.   Heading east bound on the Penna TPK end to end, you can get into the 70+mpg range.  Heading westbound you'll just get EPA rating.   Why?  Because the Volt can effectively re-fuel on the downhill stretches and use that for the uphill.  Eastbound there is more downhill than uphill, so the Volt spends a lot more time regenerating its batteries via the car's inertia rather than the gas engine.  

 

Because it has more battery capacity and power than a regular hybrid, the Volt gets to take greater advantage of the downward momentum.   Regular hybrids like the Fusion or Pruis can have their batteries recharged rather quickly on the downhill sections, and once those batteries are full, the excess energy is wasted as heat. 

 

The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

 

I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

 

i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

 

My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

 

The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

 

I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

 

i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

 

My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

 

The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

 

Whoa. That's awesome.

 

I really like the idea of te plug-in hybrid design. I like it more than any other hybrid drivetrain out there, as of now at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

 

 

 

The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

 

 

 

The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

 

 

 

The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

 

 

 

The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

 

 

I have friends that have a Volt and only fill up 3 times a year, but still do 15,000 miles a year.  They're just in the perfect part of the segment with 30 mile round trip commutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

 

If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

 

If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

 

Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

 

If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

 

Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

 

 

True, but run the numbers.  You usually get the full force of the tax credit built right in and GM likes leasing them. 

 

My friends ended up leasing theirs so cheap, the savings in fuel costs each month (they came from an old Pathfiner or 4Runner) completely covered the monthly leasing costs.  It also only increased their electric bill about $35 a month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

 

 

 

The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number.

 

 

The rating was done on a conservative side because since day one, everything pertaining to this car has been a political maelstrom to disservice GM. In the current Volt I have friends and colleagues that see 50MPG regularly when the EV is done. I'm betting smart money that this one is gonna beat that number by at least 10 in tests.

And THIS is why you don't try and squeeze every last molecule of fuel in a quest for paper mpg numbers and then shout it from the rafters. This car is a technological marvel, but we can't discount the fact that GM's conservative approach has helped the car punch above its weight mileage-wise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

42 mpg on gas isn't particularly impressive, but it's important to note that first gen owners actually GOT the rated efficiency. A lot of hybrids advertising 45+ mpg can't say that. 53 miles on battery charge is quite nice, though.

 

MPG in the Volt is a lot more "your mileage may vary" than standard gas cars.   It greatly depends on the terrain and driving style.   Heading east bound on the Penna TPK end to end, you can get into the 70+mpg range.  Heading westbound you'll just get EPA rating.   Why?  Because the Volt can effectively re-fuel on the downhill stretches and use that for the uphill.  Eastbound there is more downhill than uphill, so the Volt spends a lot more time regenerating its batteries via the car's inertia rather than the gas engine.  

 

Because it has more battery capacity and power than a regular hybrid, the Volt gets to take greater advantage of the downward momentum.   Regular hybrids like the Fusion or Pruis can have their batteries recharged rather quickly on the downhill sections, and once those batteries are full, the excess energy is wasted as heat. 

 

The 42mpg EPA rating is actually a bit of a disservice to the Volt since the actual results can vary so widely.... it needs to be more of a range of efficiency rather than a single number. 

 

that is a good explanation telling how sophisticated it is 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

 

I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

 

i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

 

My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

 

The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

 

now that is EXTREMELY appealing, is there a safeguard in place so that under no condition the gas engine will start in that scenario?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

a good friend who owns a Volt says he gets 45 mpg on gas on his right now, and that is on long highway trip with 4 ppl inside.  actually he says the mileage is pretty much 40+ no matter what when just running on gas.  If the new one is better.....

 

I actually looked at a used 2013 Volt a couple weeks ago, and test drove it, it got sold (it was a screaming deal) but one thing that was in my mind is should a person wait till the range and mpg get even better yet.  I really think a cruze diesel, or a volt, or even the new Malibu hybrid will all be good ways to drive with less fuel / elec.  The used volt was getting really cheap.........

 

i would be all go on a current Cruze diesel but the 2017 has the chance to get better mpg yet.  For me the question i ask myself is whether i really want every day to have to plug the thing in (PITA) and how the volt ultimately does in winter.

 

My test with the Volt was in winter time and it was fantastic.  Just schlepping around town and plugging it in at night I got something like 700mpg since I never used the gas.   I have a garage, so plugging it in wasn't an issue... pull in, close the door, pop the plug cover, plug it in, go inside.

 

The great thing (possibly my favorite thing) about the Volt was the ability to turn it on remotely and have it pre-heat itself off of house current even with the garage door closed.

 

now that is EXTREMELY appealing, is there a safeguard in place so that under no condition the gas engine will start in that scenario?

 

 

When it is plugged in, the gas engine will not start.  The only issue is if you forgot to plug in the car, then the gas motor could start, but due to a recall, it will now shut off after 10 minutes of no activity.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

With my 24 mile round trip commute, five days a week, the Volt is the perfect kind of car for a guy like me. Would save me so much money in the long run.

 

If you don't mind leasing, the deals on the Volt really would save you money.

 

Very true but I tend to keep my cars for more than a few years these days so financing one is not a big deal for me.

 

 

True, but run the numbers.  You usually get the full force of the tax credit built right in and GM likes leasing them. 

 

My friends ended up leasing theirs so cheap, the savings in fuel costs each month (they came from an old Pathfiner or 4Runner) completely covered the monthly leasing costs.  It also only increased their electric bill about $35 a month.

 

That's always good to know. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Today's Birthdays

    1. K.C.
      K.C.
      Age: 52
  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      About a month ago, we reported on a California Air Resources Board (CARB) document that revealed the 2019 Camaro could be getting a seven-speed manual for the 6.2L V8. At the time, speculation was that the manual transmission could come from the Corvette. But it appears this dream has been popped.
      Last week, Bozi Tatarevic on Twitter uncovered that the document listing the seven-speed manual for the Camaro was marked as a canceled. A new document uploaded on the same day shows the 'Trans Type' being a six-speed manual and 10-speed automatic. CarBuzz speculates that the seven-speed transmission has been pushed back to 2020. Our guesses as to why GM pulled the seven-speed off the CARB document could either be that GM ran into issues with fitting the Corvette's seven-speed in the Camaro - the transmission mounts on the rear-axle in the Corvette while the Camaro mounts it at the engine. There could also be the issue of transmission being slightly too expensive for the Camaro.
      Source: hoonable on Twitter, (2), CarBuzz
       

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      About a month ago, we reported on a California Air Resources Board (CARB) document that revealed the 2019 Camaro could be getting a seven-speed manual for the 6.2L V8. At the time, speculation was that the manual transmission could come from the Corvette. But it appears this dream has been popped.
      Last week, Bozi Tatarevic on Twitter uncovered that the document listing the seven-speed manual for the Camaro was marked as a canceled. A new document uploaded on the same day shows the 'Trans Type' being a six-speed manual and 10-speed automatic. CarBuzz speculates that the seven-speed transmission has been pushed back to 2020. Our guesses as to why GM pulled the seven-speed off the CARB document could either be that GM ran into issues with fitting the Corvette's seven-speed in the Camaro - the transmission mounts on the rear-axle in the Corvette while the Camaro mounts it at the engine. There could also be the issue of transmission being slightly too expensive for the Camaro.
      Source: hoonable on Twitter, (2), CarBuzz
       
    • By William Maley
      Tesla's production hell seems to be only getting worse than better. Various issues at their Freemont plant has caused the automaker to push back their goal of producing 5,000 Model 3s from late last year to June of this year. This, in turn, has caused some holders of Model 3 reservations to have their order pushed back to 2019.
      “As we work hard to meet demand, we wanted to let you know that your estimated delivery timing has been adjusted to a slightly later window,” Tesla said in an email to customers.
      According to Bloomberg, the new date depends on when the reservation was placed and what model was chosen. Tesla is trying to get the more expensive long-range battery model out first before starting production of the cheaper standard battery model. This has buyers of the latter model worried as they might not get the full $7,500 tax credit. The credit begins to phase out once an automaker has built 200,000, something Tesla expects to hit sometime this year.
      The move has caused some reservation holders to take to various forums and Twitter to complain. Others are deciding to jump ship and buy a Chevrolet Bolt. Reuters reports that Chevrolet dealers in California are seeing a noticeable increase of Tesla shoppers interested in the Bolt.
      “We’re getting the Tesla people who wanted their Model 3. We ask them, ‘What other cars are you interested in?’ They’re mostly Tesla. But they want the car now. They don’t want to wait,” said Yev Kaplinskiy of Stewart Chevrolet.
      Kaplinskiy said they sold 15 Bolts last weekend.
      Chevrolet is taking advantage of the delay by emailing some prospective buyers this week with the message of, “Bolt EV: Now available.”
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      Tesla's production hell seems to be only getting worse than better. Various issues at their Freemont plant has caused the automaker to push back their goal of producing 5,000 Model 3s from late last year to June of this year. This, in turn, has caused some holders of Model 3 reservations to have their order pushed back to 2019.
      “As we work hard to meet demand, we wanted to let you know that your estimated delivery timing has been adjusted to a slightly later window,” Tesla said in an email to customers.
      According to Bloomberg, the new date depends on when the reservation was placed and what model was chosen. Tesla is trying to get the more expensive long-range battery model out first before starting production of the cheaper standard battery model. This has buyers of the latter model worried as they might not get the full $7,500 tax credit. The credit begins to phase out once an automaker has built 200,000, something Tesla expects to hit sometime this year.
      The move has caused some reservation holders to take to various forums and Twitter to complain. Others are deciding to jump ship and buy a Chevrolet Bolt. Reuters reports that Chevrolet dealers in California are seeing a noticeable increase of Tesla shoppers interested in the Bolt.
      “We’re getting the Tesla people who wanted their Model 3. We ask them, ‘What other cars are you interested in?’ They’re mostly Tesla. But they want the car now. They don’t want to wait,” said Yev Kaplinskiy of Stewart Chevrolet.
      Kaplinskiy said they sold 15 Bolts last weekend.
      Chevrolet is taking advantage of the delay by emailing some prospective buyers this week with the message of, “Bolt EV: Now available.”
      Source: Bloomberg, Reuters
    • By William Maley
      Big January Gains for Chevrolet Crossovers and Trucks Drive GM Sales Increase
      Strong Start for Buick, Driven by Envision, LaCrosse Cadillac Escalade, ATS, XTS and XT5 Retail Sales up Sharply Commercial Deliveries Rise DETROIT — General Motors (NYSE: GM), which ended 2017 as the automaker with the fastest-growing crossover sales in the United States, today reported a 20 percent year-over-year gain in the segment in January, along with a 7 percent increase in truck deliveries. GM total sales in January totaled 198,548 units, up more than 1 percent.
      Demand for Chevrolet trucks and crossovers was very robust, helping the brand increase deliveries by 5 percent year over year:
      Chevrolet was the fastest-growing crossover brand of 2017, and January deliveries were up 40 percent. The all-new Equinox and Traverse, as well as the Trax and Bolt EV, all posted their best-ever January sales. Chevrolet’s unique three-truck pickup strategy delivered a 17 percent increase in deliveries, with the Colorado up 25 percent and the Silverado up 15 percent. It was the best January ever for Silverado crew cabs. Chevrolet Tahoe deliveries were up 22 percent. “All of our brands are building momentum in the industry’s hottest and most profitable segments,” said Kurt McNeil, U.S. vice president, Sales Operations. “Chevrolet led the growth of the small crossover segment with the Trax as well as the mid-pickup segment with the Colorado. Now, we have the all-new Equinox and Traverse delivering higher sales, share and transaction prices.”
      Buick and GMC
      Buick and GMC were major contributors to GM’s year-over-year growth in crossover sales and total sales. Buick also saw a major acceleration in LaCrosse deliveries, which contributed to a year-over-year sales increase of 4 percent for the brand.
      The GMC Terrain, which is all new for 2018, saw a 14 percent increase. The GMC Canyon posted a 5 percent gain. Buick Envision sales were up 14 percent for the vehicle’s best January yet.   Buick LaCrosse sales more than doubled to 3,006 units. Buick’s crossover momentum will continue to grow with greater availability of the redesigned Enclave, launched late last year, and the Regal TourX, which began arriving in dealerships in January.
      Cadillac
      Cadillac was strong in several segments, helping the brand earn a 9 percent increase in retail deliveries.
      Retail sales of the Escalade were up 12 percent year over year, the vehicle gained more than 2 points of retail segment share and ATPs rose by about $2,300. In addition, retail deliveries of the Cadillac XT5 crossover rose 9 percent, and the ATS and XTS were up 18 percent and 30 percent, respectively. Other GM Highlights (vs. 2017)
      Retail deliveries were down 2 percent and retail mix of total sales was 76 percent. Fleet sales were up 16 percent, with combined Commercial and Government deliveries up 44 percent and daily rental deliveries down 7 percent. GM’s incentive spending was 12.8 percent, down 1 point from a year ago, and down 2 points month over month, according to J.D. Power PIN estimates. Average transaction prices were up $1,270 year-over-year, according to J.D. Power PIN estimates.
  • My Clubs

  • Who's Online (See full list)

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We  Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×