Jump to content
William Maley

Ram News: Spying: Ram 1500 Sporting A Split Tailgate?

Recommended Posts

A few years ago, reports popped up about a patent filed by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. It was a tailgate that could be folded down or split open into two swing-out halves. That patent has now become reality as a new set of spy photos reveals a next-generation Ram 1500 sporting one.

Compared to the original patent filing which showed a 50/50 split, the one shown in the spy photos appears to be a 70/30 split. We're assuming this to allow Ram to use the same handle mechanism on this and a standard tailgate. The one item the spy photos don't tell us is how you open the split tailgate. There might be handle on the top of the tailgate, but we're speculating here.

There were some other Ram 1500 mules capture who had their tailgates covered up. But they did reveal that the RamBox storage system would be making a return.

Source: Autoblog, AutoGuide


View full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, Cool Factor is there and the ease of dumping stuff and not having to clean out the tail gate gape is cool, but from a commercial stand point, I wonder how many will get broken, bent, etc. and not be able to close and then you have people using rope or bungee cords to keep it somewhat closed.

Plus I hate that the body lines are already off from the sag of the doors. For an SUV, I love stagecoach doors, but for the Pickup Truck, I am truly on the sideline about this.

RamSplitTailgate.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

Hopefully they fix the massive misalignment  in that tailgate. 

They have to show off their Fiat parentage somehow...

2 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Neat idear. I was really intrigued when I tried out the swing out tailgate on the Ridgeline. 

It is a neat idea.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Neat idear. I was really intrigued when I tried out the swing out tailgate on the Ridgeline. 

But is the Honda not just one big door rather than two different size Stagecoach doors?

Much like how the 70's and 80's station wagons were? I loved that feature on my parents Delta 98 Station Wagon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, dfelt said:

But is the Honda not just one big door rather than two different size Stagecoach doors?

Much like how the 70's and 80's station wagons were? I loved that feature on my parents Delta 98 Station Wagon.

Yes, it's one big door, not split like the Ram.  Yes, it swings out or folds down like the old wagons.  I immediately saw the usefulness of it when I tried it out. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearance issues when towing a trailer is what I've heard as far as preference for barn doors vs. tailgate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The specific scenario IIRC was a friend w/ a Suburban and a travel trailer..said a tailgate would hit the propane tanks on the hitch tongue while barn doors would clear the tanks...(esp. if the Suburban was at an angle to the trailer).  I'm sure there are other reasons for preferences..that's the only one I've heard.   Rearward visibility w/ a Suburban was better w/ a tailgate than barn doors.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, balthazar said:

Having logged a few hundred thousand miles in pickups, I personally can't think of a use, but perhaps others can. A lot more sense on a wagon tho.

Reach and lifting. Having the tailgate swing out puts you 18" - 24" closer to that bag of mulch you're trying to reach without hopping up into the bed.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a fan.  Too much possibility of turning to crap with heavy use.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Reach and lifting. Having the tailgate swing out puts you 18" - 24" closer to that bag of mulch you're trying to reach without hopping up into the bed.

I could see that especially useful on modern full size trucks where the bed floor seems to be 36-40 inches off the ground.  Absurdly high liftover..

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

Not a fan.  Too much possibility of turning to crap with heavy use.

oh this is totally a "lifestyle" truck option.... You know, someone who needs a 1500 to haul their kayak and 6 bags of mulch.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

oh this is totally a "lifestyle" truck option.... You know, someone who needs a 1500 to haul their kayak and 6 bags of mulch.

LoL... I carried one bag of potting soil and a bag of grass seed in my Jeep a while back. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only get into the bed of my truck (which I use nearly daily) not even once/quarter. Mostly when I carry long ladders- I use a tension bar near the head of the bed over the ladder as insurance, and the latch is in the center of the bar. I brought home 10 bags of mulch in the spring, I stacked them at the rear of the bed and reached them easily over the dropped gate. 2500HD bed floor is decently high and I'm not tall.

Wednesday I had a table saw, chop saw, sawhorses/an old door, pile of small lumber and a compressor/air hose in the bed- all loaded/unloaded from the ground.

The only time I am 'aware' of the tailgate protrusion is shoveling a bedfull of dirt/stone dust out. Even so, on a 6.5' bed, I do it all from the ground... but that's the one scenario I can see a swing out gate would be useful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure if this goes into production, there will be an explanation.  It's  a product differentiating feature.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Neat, but I don't understand why? What is the benefit of this over a regular tailgate? Is it worth the additional complexity? 

Simple, less back strain of getting things out when you do not need the tailgate down. Easier to dump bark, rock, dirt, etc. out of the bed and not have to deal with a dirty space between the tailgate and bed to close. Many advantages to this.

With that said I can also see a high failure rate especially by just normal people who do not take care of their auto's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, those issues don't seem like real issues. They're more made up issues they decided to solve a problem for.

Fixing something that wasn't broken. Making up a problem to find a solution for. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ccap41 said:

Yeah, those issues don't seem like real issues. They're more made up issues they decided to solve a problem for.

Fixing something that wasn't broken. Making up a problem to find a solution for. 

Tell that to the medical community that sees plenty of overweight out of shape humans that strain their back reaching for stuff over lips of car trunks, truck tailgates, etc. Very surprising the amount of medical problems caused by it.

You would be amazed also how much of personal injury happens from pushing and pulling stuff especially over a tailgate. OSHA has stats on this. They say 36% of all back injuries are from improper lifting and lack of ease in getting items into and out of trucks, cars and other delivery formats. Amazing reading the statistics OSHA has compiled on back injuries.

Until you posted your statement CCAP41 I also gave it a grain of salt feeling till I started to go through the various OSHA and other gov web sites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could care less about lazy pieces of sh!t. Our vehicles shouldn't cost more because of them.Yes, R&D for this for fat people is costing everybody who buys the truck whether optioned with it or not. 

Also, it's a tailgate, you drag the item to you before lifting with your arms straight out, like an idiot. I had to do the little learning stuff

As long as you and I know how to lift something up, this isn't an issue.. If people weren't stupid, this wouldn't be an issue. They'd know how to lift something up without hurting themselves. 

Can't fix stupid. Wait, sure you can, here's a Ram SpltGate! 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

I could care less about lazy pieces of sh!t. Our vehicles shouldn't cost more because of them.Yes, R&D for this for fat people is costing everybody who buys the truck whether optioned with it or not. 

Also, it's a tailgate, you drag the item to you before lifting with your arms straight out, like an idiot. I had to do the little learning stuff

As long as you and I know how to lift something up, this isn't an issue.. If people weren't stupid, this wouldn't be an issue. They'd know how to lift something up without hurting themselves. 

Can't fix stupid. Wait, sure you can, here's a Ram SpltGate! 

Wish I could give ya a upvote and a laugh vote as you nailed it. Sadly we cannot fix stupidity or as I like to call it, a lack of common sense. :D

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   1 Member, 0 Anonymous, 45 Guests (See full list)



  • Social Stream

  • Similar Content

    • By William Maley
      "A New Era Begins November 2018" is the title of video that Mazda has uploaded to their YouTube channel. The sixteen-second video provides brief glimpses of two vehicles. One is a close up of the rear with a sharply raked c-pillar, while the other is a side profile shot. A number of people believe this is our first glimpse of the next-generation Mazda3 - mostly due to elements of the Kai Concept showing up.
      That title also hints at a big change coming with the next-generation 3. The Skyactiv-X powertrain with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) will be available. HCCI allows a gas engine to use compression to ignite the fuel. This allows for better efficiency and more power.
      We're expecting Mazda to show off the new 3 at the LA Auto Show next month.
      Stay tuned.
      Source: Mazda

       

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      "A New Era Begins November 2018" is the title of video that Mazda has uploaded to their YouTube channel. The sixteen-second video provides brief glimpses of two vehicles. One is a close up of the rear with a sharply raked c-pillar, while the other is a side profile shot. A number of people believe this is our first glimpse of the next-generation Mazda3 - mostly due to elements of the Kai Concept showing up.
      That title also hints at a big change coming with the next-generation 3. The Skyactiv-X powertrain with homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) will be available. HCCI allows a gas engine to use compression to ignite the fuel. This allows for better efficiency and more power.
      We're expecting Mazda to show off the new 3 at the LA Auto Show next month.
      Stay tuned.
      Source: Mazda

       
    • By William Maley
      The past decade has seen BMW exploring new niches in the marketplace with such models as the X6 and 5-Series GT. Some of them had paid off, while others haven't. The 3-Series GT falls into the latter. Following in the footsteps of the 5-Series GT (now 6-Series GT), the 3-Series offered a higher seating position and extra space for those who didn't want and SUV. But it never found an audience and BMW has decided to kill it off.
      “When we did the GT we saw that in demographic change people want to sit a little more upright. But then you saw X1 and X3 you can sit upright and you feel younger. So this segment is under pressure from SUVs, which are having no disadvantage in fuel consumption or in ride and handling,” said Klaus Fröhlich, BMW's r&d chief to Motoring.
      Last May, we reported that the next 3-Series GT would have moved over to the 4-Series lineup - similar to what BMW did to the 5-Series GT. But it seems those plans are off the table.
      Its unclear at the moment when BMW could end production of the 3-Series GT.
      Source: Motoring

      View full article
    • By William Maley
      The past decade has seen BMW exploring new niches in the marketplace with such models as the X6 and 5-Series GT. Some of them had paid off, while others haven't. The 3-Series GT falls into the latter. Following in the footsteps of the 5-Series GT (now 6-Series GT), the 3-Series offered a higher seating position and extra space for those who didn't want and SUV. But it never found an audience and BMW has decided to kill it off.
      “When we did the GT we saw that in demographic change people want to sit a little more upright. But then you saw X1 and X3 you can sit upright and you feel younger. So this segment is under pressure from SUVs, which are having no disadvantage in fuel consumption or in ride and handling,” said Klaus Fröhlich, BMW's r&d chief to Motoring.
      Last May, we reported that the next 3-Series GT would have moved over to the 4-Series lineup - similar to what BMW did to the 5-Series GT. But it seems those plans are off the table.
      Its unclear at the moment when BMW could end production of the 3-Series GT.
      Source: Motoring
    • By William Maley
      Prices on new pickup trucks have been steadily increasing as more people are choosing them as their family vehicle and in turn are wanting more luxury features. But this rise in prices has been making it harder for the average buyer to afford one.
      Data from Edmunds shows through September, the average transaction price for a full-size pickup is $48,377; a 48 percent increase when compared to 10 years ago and 19 percent increased when compared to 2013.
      "A 48-percent increase in price is the highest price increase for that time period out of all vehicle categories. Even at $45,000, it prices a lot of people out," said Ivan Drury, senior analyst at Edmunds to the Detroit Free Press.
      "There are consumers who can afford the bare bones basic vehicles at $30,000, but once you're shown an option like a ventilated seat versus a cloth seat and it's 90 degrees outside, it becomes a very compelling argument to say yes. Ten years ago, comfort packages weren't offered on trucks. People are saying, 'I want those even if those vehicles are used to haul mulch.' "
      A very telling sign that truck prices are beginning to push people out is the massive difference between the expected and the actually average transactional price. Cox Automotive reports that buyers of a full-size pickup expected to pay an average of $38,529 through the month August. The actual average transaction price through August was $47,987 according to Cox.
      Also seeing a rise is the average income of truck buyers. Alexander Edwards, president of consultancy Strategic Vision tells the Free Press  that the median household income of a truck buyer has risen form $76,660 in 2009 to $100,305 in 2018. More telling is that the truck buyer has a higher income than a car buyer ($95,355).
      Some are beginning to worry that pickup trucks are becoming a bit too expensive.
      "In 1988, I sold my first pickup at $20,000 and I thought, 'Man, who could ever afford this?' Now, they're $60,000, $70,000, $80,000. ... I'm not sure everybody wants all that technology, but we're adding all of it. We're actually in the luxury business at those prices," said Charlie Gilchrist, owner of Gilchrist Automotive in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
      A survey done by CarGurus correlates Gilchrist's view. Asking 203 current pickup owners from their user panel, CarGurus reports that owners would call paying $35,000 on a truck a good deal. But increase it to the average price of $45,200 and its too much. Respondents also said they would be willing to give up such features as a automatic open-close tailgate and Wi-Fi hotspot for a lower price.
      “This survey showed that pickup truck owners believe some of the new technology is nice to have, but not essential and not worth the price. We’re at an interesting time in the pickup truck category where many people are using their pickup trucks for more than just work. Those looking for a truck purely for work purposes don’t need all of the new luxury features, and those looking for a truck for commuting or leisure don’t need all of the new work features,” said Madison Gross, CarGurus' senior manager of customer insights.
      Source: Detroit Free Press

      View full article
  • My Clubs

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Reader Rides

About us

CheersandGears.com - Founded 2001

We ♥ Cars

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

facebook

×