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William Maley

Ram News: Spying: Ram 1500 Sporting A Split Tailgate?

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A few years ago, reports popped up about a patent filed by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. It was a tailgate that could be folded down or split open into two swing-out halves. That patent has now become reality as a new set of spy photos reveals a next-generation Ram 1500 sporting one.

Compared to the original patent filing which showed a 50/50 split, the one shown in the spy photos appears to be a 70/30 split. We're assuming this to allow Ram to use the same handle mechanism on this and a standard tailgate. The one item the spy photos don't tell us is how you open the split tailgate. There might be handle on the top of the tailgate, but we're speculating here.

There were some other Ram 1500 mules capture who had their tailgates covered up. But they did reveal that the RamBox storage system would be making a return.

Source: Autoblog, AutoGuide


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OK, Cool Factor is there and the ease of dumping stuff and not having to clean out the tail gate gape is cool, but from a commercial stand point, I wonder how many will get broken, bent, etc. and not be able to close and then you have people using rope or bungee cords to keep it somewhat closed.

Plus I hate that the body lines are already off from the sag of the doors. For an SUV, I love stagecoach doors, but for the Pickup Truck, I am truly on the sideline about this.

RamSplitTailgate.jpg

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6 minutes ago, surreal1272 said:

Hopefully they fix the massive misalignment  in that tailgate. 

They have to show off their Fiat parentage somehow...

2 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Neat idear. I was really intrigued when I tried out the swing out tailgate on the Ridgeline. 

It is a neat idea.

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5 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Neat idear. I was really intrigued when I tried out the swing out tailgate on the Ridgeline. 

But is the Honda not just one big door rather than two different size Stagecoach doors?

Much like how the 70's and 80's station wagons were? I loved that feature on my parents Delta 98 Station Wagon.

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1 minute ago, dfelt said:

But is the Honda not just one big door rather than two different size Stagecoach doors?

Much like how the 70's and 80's station wagons were? I loved that feature on my parents Delta 98 Station Wagon.

Yes, it's one big door, not split like the Ram.  Yes, it swings out or folds down like the old wagons.  I immediately saw the usefulness of it when I tried it out. 

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Having logged a few hundred thousand miles in pickups, I personally can't think of a use, but perhaps others can. A lot more sense on a wagon tho.

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The specific scenario IIRC was a friend w/ a Suburban and a travel trailer..said a tailgate would hit the propane tanks on the hitch tongue while barn doors would clear the tanks...(esp. if the Suburban was at an angle to the trailer).  I'm sure there are other reasons for preferences..that's the only one I've heard.   Rearward visibility w/ a Suburban was better w/ a tailgate than barn doors.

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar
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5 hours ago, balthazar said:

Having logged a few hundred thousand miles in pickups, I personally can't think of a use, but perhaps others can. A lot more sense on a wagon tho.

Reach and lifting. Having the tailgate swing out puts you 18" - 24" closer to that bag of mulch you're trying to reach without hopping up into the bed.

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Not a fan.  Too much possibility of turning to crap with heavy use.

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7 hours ago, Drew Dowdell said:

Reach and lifting. Having the tailgate swing out puts you 18" - 24" closer to that bag of mulch you're trying to reach without hopping up into the bed.

I could see that especially useful on modern full size trucks where the bed floor seems to be 36-40 inches off the ground.  Absurdly high liftover..

Edited by Cubical-aka-Moltar

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2 hours ago, ocnblu said:

Not a fan.  Too much possibility of turning to crap with heavy use.

oh this is totally a "lifestyle" truck option.... You know, someone who needs a 1500 to haul their kayak and 6 bags of mulch.

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8 minutes ago, Drew Dowdell said:

oh this is totally a "lifestyle" truck option.... You know, someone who needs a 1500 to haul their kayak and 6 bags of mulch.

LoL... I carried one bag of potting soil and a bag of grass seed in my Jeep a while back. 

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I only get into the bed of my truck (which I use nearly daily) not even once/quarter. Mostly when I carry long ladders- I use a tension bar near the head of the bed over the ladder as insurance, and the latch is in the center of the bar. I brought home 10 bags of mulch in the spring, I stacked them at the rear of the bed and reached them easily over the dropped gate. 2500HD bed floor is decently high and I'm not tall.

Wednesday I had a table saw, chop saw, sawhorses/an old door, pile of small lumber and a compressor/air hose in the bed- all loaded/unloaded from the ground.

The only time I am 'aware' of the tailgate protrusion is shoveling a bedfull of dirt/stone dust out. Even so, on a 6.5' bed, I do it all from the ground... but that's the one scenario I can see a swing out gate would be useful.

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Neat, but I don't understand why? What is the benefit of this over a regular tailgate? Is it worth the additional complexity? 

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12 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

Neat, but I don't understand why? What is the benefit of this over a regular tailgate? Is it worth the additional complexity? 

Simple, less back strain of getting things out when you do not need the tailgate down. Easier to dump bark, rock, dirt, etc. out of the bed and not have to deal with a dirty space between the tailgate and bed to close. Many advantages to this.

With that said I can also see a high failure rate especially by just normal people who do not take care of their auto's.

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Yeah, those issues don't seem like real issues. They're more made up issues they decided to solve a problem for.

Fixing something that wasn't broken. Making up a problem to find a solution for. 

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1 minute ago, ccap41 said:

Yeah, those issues don't seem like real issues. They're more made up issues they decided to solve a problem for.

Fixing something that wasn't broken. Making up a problem to find a solution for. 

Tell that to the medical community that sees plenty of overweight out of shape humans that strain their back reaching for stuff over lips of car trunks, truck tailgates, etc. Very surprising the amount of medical problems caused by it.

You would be amazed also how much of personal injury happens from pushing and pulling stuff especially over a tailgate. OSHA has stats on this. They say 36% of all back injuries are from improper lifting and lack of ease in getting items into and out of trucks, cars and other delivery formats. Amazing reading the statistics OSHA has compiled on back injuries.

Until you posted your statement CCAP41 I also gave it a grain of salt feeling till I started to go through the various OSHA and other gov web sites.

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I could care less about lazy pieces of sh!t. Our vehicles shouldn't cost more because of them.Yes, R&D for this for fat people is costing everybody who buys the truck whether optioned with it or not. 

Also, it's a tailgate, you drag the item to you before lifting with your arms straight out, like an idiot. I had to do the little learning stuff

As long as you and I know how to lift something up, this isn't an issue.. If people weren't stupid, this wouldn't be an issue. They'd know how to lift something up without hurting themselves. 

Can't fix stupid. Wait, sure you can, here's a Ram SpltGate! 

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5 minutes ago, ccap41 said:

I could care less about lazy pieces of sh!t. Our vehicles shouldn't cost more because of them.Yes, R&D for this for fat people is costing everybody who buys the truck whether optioned with it or not. 

Also, it's a tailgate, you drag the item to you before lifting with your arms straight out, like an idiot. I had to do the little learning stuff

As long as you and I know how to lift something up, this isn't an issue.. If people weren't stupid, this wouldn't be an issue. They'd know how to lift something up without hurting themselves. 

Can't fix stupid. Wait, sure you can, here's a Ram SpltGate! 

Wish I could give ya a upvote and a laugh vote as you nailed it. Sadly we cannot fix stupidity or as I like to call it, a lack of common sense. :D

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