dfelt

Anyone else mountain bike?

17 posts in this topic

dfelt    1,772

I am a regular life long season pass holder for Stevens pass washington for skiing, but years ago I started to dabble in Mountain biking and have to say it is crazy fun and can be just as challenging as skiing. A monster adrenaline rush. :metal: 

Stevens Pass

https://www.stevenspass.com/site 

They opened up a few weeks back a new Double Black Diamond Trail call Berserker and I have to say I will wait after having actually gone on it slowly. Way crazy as this video does not do it justice for how steep it really is. I am excited about all the new ski trails and ramps making new jumps we will have this winter.

So does anyone else Mountain Bike?

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ykX    95

I do more of a trail biking.  Few places on the trail I go to that get the blood flowing but mostly enjoy the ride in the woods in a State park not too far from me.

What bike do you have?

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ccap41    1,161

I have. I used to a good amount but it's been years since consistently riding. I just live in a crap area to want to mountain bike.. mid west.. If I lived in Missouri and not Illinois it would be much easier. There are some good places in Missouri but IL is just plain flat.

This is my bike. 2011 Giant Talon 2 29er. I never really got enough seat time on the 29er to be 100% confident in myself compared to my Schwinn Mesa GS(back when Schwinn sold real bikes).

Giant

74BECC4D-C11D-4FAB-963F-7476DA86974C_zps

Schwinn

3B62BB51-76A3-49D1-8E23-39750A855A03_zps

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ccap41    1,161

How do you feel about the increase wheel/tire size? I guess if you're more of a trail rider you'd want the bigger wheels anyway.

Looking at giant's site I think I had a Talon 1 not 2. I forgot that the 2's were a small step down in components.

Shooooot I need to get the bike out and ride this weekend.

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ccap41    1,161
33 minutes ago, ykX said:

I have Trek 29er as well

 

 

2016600_2016_A_1_Marlin_6.jpg

I just realized that's a Marlin! One o my buddies I rode with had a Marlin as well. Then he got an itch and bought a Full suspension Specialized for like 2k...

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Suaviloquent    713

Why yes sir, I dabbled in XC racing 5 years ago, but the best fun I've ever had is either Enduro or Downhill.

 

Do yourselves all a favour and get the Giant Glory for downhill, if you go that route. Tried, and tested and true.

 

And get the good stuff. Get SRAM X0 or Shimano XTR drivetrain. Don't get AVID Elixir's (DOT fluid is not good for pads or rotors if it leaks, hell it just shouldn't be sued at all IMO, even if it gives better sealing from air bubble accumulation). Get Shimano XTR with new ICETECH FREEZA Rotors.

If you want high-tech even more, try XTR Di2. The best sequential shift setup there is. I think the shift points are top notch, really.

One-by is nice too, but for people wanting a more versatile bike, a 2-by chainring setup will be very much appreciated if you also ride on the road or paved trails. Tubeless is all the rage now, it's lighter in most cases and proper installation will give you better flat resistance as smaller punctures will be sealed by the compound sealant. Just make sure the rims you have are corrosion resistant, as some sealant compounds are not to be used with certain wheels, or wheel manufacturers (like Shimano) will not guarantee their wheels for use with sealant in some cases.

And when it comes to suspension, I'm partial to hardtails still, because that's where I started, but suspension will give you better isolation from technical terrain.

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dfelt    1,772
4 hours ago, ykX said:

I do more of a trail biking.  Few places on the trail I go to that get the blood flowing but mostly enjoy the ride in the woods in a State park not too far from me.

What bike do you have?

I own a Cannondale with HD Rock Shox forks. Frame is special order since I am rather big, 

Have it hung in the garage and was going to grab a photo of if off their web site, but wow, have not looked at bikes in the last few years and they do not make mine anylonger. In fact I see all the mountain bikes have gone to a universal womans type design. The rest, forks, big fat tires, proper brakes, etc. are still the same, but the frames have really changed.

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ykX    95
1 hour ago, ccap41 said:

How do you feel about the increase wheel/tire size? I guess if you're more of a trail rider you'd want the bigger wheels anyway.

Looking at giant's site I think I had a Talon 1 not 2. I forgot that the 2's were a small step down in components.

Shooooot I need to get the bike out and ride this weekend.

Yes, I think the bigger wheels help on the trails, plus I am pretty tall with long legs so the bigger wheels kind of work out for me better.  I "test drove" both 26 and 29 and  while 26 felt more agile, the 29 felt easier rolling and better size for me.

Yea, that the entry level Marlin, good enough for my needs for now.  Maybe, down the road when my son gets older I will give it to him and buy something higher end.

55 minutes ago, Frisky Dingo said:

I've been wanting to get into it for some time now.

I am proud to say that I put my whole family on bikes.  Even wife started riding.  Not on the off road trails or anything extreme but a family ride in a nice park is great.

Edited by ykX
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Suaviloquent    713

29ers are more forgiving on technical terrain, and yes, they can get to much higher speeds...

 

But I learned on 26ers. and they actually having less rotational inertia, and for someone who could handle the technical terrain in spite of the lower compliance of smaller wheels, I'd say there is a place for them. 

 

cadence is a big factor to. I feel for me, if I was going to have higher variability on cadence, and more up and down or switch backs, I'm more agile on a 26er. If I'm bloodlust mode for the fastest speed possible, then 29er for sure, but I might not have as much fun though. 

 

 

Though few manufacturers still make 26er wheels.

However, one thing for sure, 26er wheels are stronger than 29ers, because there is less flex in spokes. It's the flip side of less compliance....

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Suaviloquent    713

Also, very nice quick tip quickie. If you can't get past the full upgrade to Shimano brakes...I know it...

 

As soon as your rotors wear out from any other manufacturer, you can switch to Shimano rotors no problem, with the brake calipers that came with the bike. Anyone telling you otherwise is a hack. 

Shimano rotors, the XT and above use an aluminum core with a steel braking surface. That's the best IMO, because a rotor that conducts heat well, will dissipate it better too. But a steel braking surface will have more friction against pads. resin pads - better for quietness, and in some cases rotor longevity, but metal pads have more friction, and better all weather performance. And resin can get easily corrupted with foreign matter, like mud and oily substances. 

If you spill oil or brake fluid on metal pads....just spray with (it's been a while, but... I think finish-line yellow degreaser) and light'em on fire!! 

 

 

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loki    289

having just a comfort/hybrid bike... i could say i've dabbled.. but i would like to save up some money to beable to do that on a more purpose ready bike.

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I did a lot of trail biking around the Colorado Springs area from '97-02 on my late 90s Specialized.  Still have the bike, but haven't ridden in years...but with the extensive trails in and around the Cleveland Metroparks, I plan to get back into it..need the exercise. 

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Wings4Life(BANNED)    1,000,000

I don't trail ride much any more, and added street friendly DTH tires.

tyre-image-DTH_l.png

I love my GT Avalanche 2.0 bike.  Upgraded components, I probably got about $1200 total into it.  I have ridden bikes costing 3x as much, and I swear I love mine better.

Looks a lot like this.

gt_ava2_blk_13_z1.jpg

Had a bad trail accident a while back, flying through wooded trails with leaves on the ground and could not see the rut that threw me in one direction and my bike in another.  Had to limp home with broken clavicle, and lots of bruises.  Front wheel was toast.

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