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William Maley

Hyundai News:Hyundai Introduces the Vision G Concept

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What you see before you is the Hyundai Vision G Concept, which debut yesterday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This concept gives a hint of what the Korean automaker possibly has in store for higher end vehicles.

 

"The design is our interpretation of the idea that Hyundai breathes into all of its vehicles – a DNA that balances design and performance with the idea that you don’t need to be over the top in terms of glitz and stereotypical luxury cues,” said Peter Schreyer, Hyundai’s president and chief design officer.

 

This is evident when compare the Vision G to another Hyundai luxury concept, the HCD-14. Where the HCD-14 was striking with a large grille, suicide doors, and oversized carbon-fiber wheels, the Vision G concept is quite the opposite. The Vision G concept features such details such as a long hood, high-beltline, and roofline that extends all the way to the trunk. The interior is richly detailed in quilted leather and wood trim. The dashboard boasts a wide, LCD screen.

 

For power, the Vision G uses the 5.0L V8 found under the hood of the Genesis and Equus sedans. The V8 produces 420 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque.

 

Hyundai will be showing off the Vision G Concept at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance on Sunday.

 

Source: Hyundai

 

 

Press Release is on Page 2


 

HYUNDAI PREMIERES “VISION G” COUPE CONCEPT AT LACMA

  • Introduces Concept as Evolution of Hyundai’s ‘Responsible and Respectful’ Luxury Family of Products


FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif. Aug. 11, 2015 – Hyundai Motor America revealed the “Vision G” Concept Coupe to a select group of media at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The concept was described as Hyundai’s inspiration for its family of future premium products that promise luxury, performance and style with the value and responsibility that is the foundation of Hyundai’s brand.

 


“The concept was designed with coordinated input from Hyundai design studios around the world, but was led by our team here in the U.S.,” said Peter Schreyer, Hyundai’s president and chief design officer. “The design is our interpretation of the idea that Hyundai breathes into all of its vehicles – a DNA that balances design and performance with the idea that you don’t need to be over the top in terms of glitz and stereotypical luxury cues.”

 

During the design process, Hyundai’s team of designers centered their work on the notion of “chivalry” – a word they felt best defined the idea that one doesn’t need to shout to be noticed and respected. “Vision G” is purposefully understated, despite its size and dramatic lines. One example of this respectful luxury – and a nod to the self-sufficiency of the driver – is a technology that automatically opens the door as if being opened by a valet.

 

The exterior styling of the concept is highlighted by a long hood, high-beltline and a cabin that presents a slingshot-like appearance. “In keeping with a design that speaks to the owner rather than ‘the spectators’ who might see the car on the road, Vision G appears dynamic and in constant motion,” said Christopher Chapman, head of Hyundai’s U.S. design center and leader of the coupe’s design team. “After all – and if all is right in the world – the only time an owner sees the exterior of the car is when it’s standing still.”

 

The underlying idea of respectful luxury flows into the interior, underscored by its clarity and simplicity. No glaring examples of luxury, but rather elegant lines and finishes.

 

The heart of “Vision G” is the award-winning 5.0-liter Tau V8 engine producing 420 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 383 lb. ft. of torque at 5,000 rpm. The Tau V8 engine family has been named to Ward’s prestigious Ten Best Engines list three times. With high-pressure direct injection for impressive power, low emissions and superb efficiency, this latest version of the Tau V8 benefits from an optimized intake runner length, enhanced timing chain for reduced friction and NVH, low-torque exhaust manifold, increased compression ratio and upgraded multiple-injection mapping. These enhancements combine to produce a flatter torque curve at lower rpm for even better driveability.

 

“Vision G” will next be shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance on Sunday, August 16 in Monterey, Calif.


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hyunday-vision-g-coupe-concept_02.jpg?it

 

 

I dont know what to think about the looks of it.

It aint ugly.

It aint pretty.

It aint bad actually......

 

I dont like it.

I dont hate it.

 

Its interesting...

And THAT is a good thing.

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I like how it looks from the front or side, but the back looks odd.  Looks like they stole Jag XJ tail lights, but it also looks like a mish-mash of Regal and XTS from the back.   I like that there is no B pillar, but somehow I guess if this made production the B pillar would be in there and it would be less cool.

 

Good engine with the V8, a V8 luxury coupe would be cool since Lincoln won't do a Mark VIII successor and Buick has no Riviera and Cadillac no Eldorado. 

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Nothing can touch the Avenir concept for luxury GT design, which is what this thing vaguely reminds me of from the rear and profile. Maybe it's a stretch, but this Hyundai design doesn't move me. Front feels like some kind of Kia/Aston/Fusion mashup.

 

Moar better.

2015-Buick-Avenir-Concept-057-1024x579.j

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yeah...I could see where you are coming from...the rear buttocks remind me of the Avenir somewhat also.  But the Avenir is not a coupe, and as SMK said, about Lincoln not doing a Mark VIII and Buick not having a Riviera and an El Miraj / Eldorado still a decade away...this car...with a V8 making 400 horsepower under the hood is a cool thing none the less...

 

And thanx to you...I can now see the Fusion headlights in the design...Im not sure how to handle that though...Ill tell you tomorrow...

Edited by oldshurst442
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The midsection of the body is quite lovely! I just love a large coupe. A Buick Avenir coupe would make a great and properly RWD Riviera!

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They can lure disloyal designers from any company they want.  If the bones are junk, that will remain as underlying truth.

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hyunday-vision-g-coupe-concept_02.jpg?it

 

 

I dont know what to think about the looks of it.

It aint ugly.

It aint pretty.

It aint bad actually......

 

I dont like it.

I dont hate it.

 

Its interesting...

And THAT is a good thing.

Holy F. I think that looks abslutely amazing.  Talk about presense on the road. That front end demands it. I haven't read the article but they better plan on using an equally powerful drivetrain.

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is it me or does it seem the gaping grill is just a lazy design element nowadays?

 

otherwise, i do like it. overall. the back end is still almost a blank slate, in a bad way.

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Nothing can touch the Avenir concept for luxury GT design, which is what this thing vaguely reminds me of from the rear and profile. Maybe it's a stretch, but this Hyundai design doesn't move me. Front feels like some kind of Kia/Aston/Fusion mashup.

 

Moar better.

2015-Buick-Avenir-Concept-057-1024x579.j

That Avenir is just gorgeous and I haven't said that about a Buick in a long time! It would be nice if GM would just go ahead and pull the trigger on this already.

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The difference between the Hyundai concept and the Avenir (aside from number of doors) is Hyundai probably has the guts to build their car, the Avenir will probably sit on the shelf because the bean counters won't be able to "build a business case" for it.

 

If you want a full size, V8, rear drive coupe, there is the Challenger, or spend over $100k for an S-class coupe or over $200k for a Bentley.  Pretty limited choices.

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They can lure disloyal designers from any company they want.  If the bones are junk, that will remain as underlying truth.

Would I be crossing the line in telling you that you are full of sunshine today?

 

I know it aint a GM car...but can you at least admire the bloody car?

Or hate the way it looks...I dont care either way....its just that your posting style today struck me as odd behavior.

The fact of the matter is still this:

 

http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a26337/go-lutz-yourself-driven-by-design/

 

From the link (posted today in Road and Track):

 

"There aren't any bad cars anymore. They just don't exist. The days of seeing a comparison test of four cars where one is the obvious loser are gone, replaced by a new age of automotive equality. Reliability, braking, steering, handling, ride, and refinement are all largely on par across automakers and segments. That leaves just one chief differentiator: design."

 

"Who's consistently at the top? Hyundai and Kia. Everything that company does is beautifully executed, thanks to the efforts of head designer Peter Schreyer."

 

Two things that I want to show you

1. All cars today are about on the same level of reliability...some are still better than others....like that paragragh says...

2. Buick may or may not build the Avenir, but Im willing to bet that Hyundai WILL produce this thing in the next two years...and THAT is a good thing...for us...the car enthusiasts...

 

Dont mean to single you out today...Im sorry if it seems that way...but your posts just struck a chord with me today.

I hope we could remain friendly to each other regardless of what has transpired today between us.

 

 

PS: Im actually down with the Fusion headlight design in this car...

Edited by oldshurst442

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Is that a Big Mouth Billy Bass you have there Hyundia?

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Is that a Big Mouth Billy Bass you have there Hyundia?

Weird, but I like it A LOT on this car. I guess they just incorporated it very well to me.

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