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Spy Shot: Chevy Volt caught from the beltline up


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Cool..looks like it has ordinary side glass instead of the funky glass of the concept, but I didn't expect that detail to make it to production. Looks like it has ordinary FWD proportions rather the wheels-forward look of the concept. Oh well. Between pic 1 and 2 you get a pretty good feel for how it's going to look overall.

I'm wondering about the black roof and the area at the bottom of the hatch...is that black paint or glass?

Edited by moltar
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Wow, I love the greenhouse and the taillights. Very cool. I almost wish it had a longer hood...something about this design looks like it would translate well on a larger car, such as an Impala.

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This looks pretty much nothing like the concept and doesn't look markedly better than what we have seen of the next Prius or the Honda GSH.

I bet if it had a Toyota badge on it then everyone would be calling it ugly.

The watering down continues.

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This looks pretty much nothing like the concept and doesn't look markedly better than what we have seen of the next Prius or the Honda GSH.

I bet if it had a Toyota badge on it then everyone would be calling it ugly.

The watering down continues.

No, it doesn't look like the concept. Otherwise (as usual) you are entirely off the mark.

This is the first "green" car that doesn't look entirely like crap.

Watered down?

No, I don't think so.

I would call this car actualized.

The concept was a "dream car" in the truest sense. While I was disappointed to learn that such a great-looking shape would not make production, I've come to understand the reason for it. I also hold out some hope that another variant might toss the aerodynamic concerns to the curb and adopt the aggressive styling of the Volt concept down the road. For this car, the first of its kind, the decision to maximize the aero makes sense.

As much as I loved the in-your-face styling of the concept, this car now hits the sweet spot of current styling with precision. To me it looks like a premium European compact, and gives a sense of quality through its design alone. It says "we are good enough to deliver this technology without building a clown car" - something Toyota only wishes it could do. In fact, the redesign looks great on its own merits. It has the look that appeals to the most 'green aware" demographic out there, the younger car buyers. I see this design having massive appeal to those who love cars like the Mini and GTI just based on its styling alone. That is just the sort of buyer GM needs to bring into the fold, and this car will do that. There will be huge enthusiasm for the Volt among buyers that represent the future of the car business, and that is how GM has a shot to right the ship. It will have to be followed by other hits of the same caliber of course, but right now it is a huge leap in the right direction.

Make no mistake, the Volt changes everything.

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This looks pretty much nothing like the concept and doesn't look markedly better than what we have seen of the next Prius or the Honda GSH.

I bet if it had a Toyota badge on it then everyone would be calling it ugly.

The watering down continues.

YOU would comment like this. I love it, I think it looks really badass.

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This looks pretty much nothing like the concept and doesn't look markedly better than what we have seen of the next Prius or the Honda GSH.

I bet if it had a Toyota badge on it then everyone would be calling it ugly.

The watering down continues.

It is different than the concept but we all knew that. It has a very clean design from what I can see, and has some nice design cues. The current Prius is ugly. I have not seen a production NG Prius so I can't make a comment about it yet.

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This looks pretty much nothing like the concept and doesn't look markedly better than what we have seen of the next Prius or the Honda GSH.

I bet if it had a Toyota badge on it then everyone would be calling it ugly.

The watering down continues.

Sorry, but I don't find cars attractive that look like the mini vacuum cleaner we used to own 15 years ago.

Styling is all a matter of opinion, but show these two pictures to anyone without telling them what they are and I bet 90% favor the Volt.

6070119.001.1M.jpg

volt-t2-1280.jpg

Edited by mustang84
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That Volt is beautiful - as I did like the concept and all it's quirky details I was concerned about what would happen when it was made 'realistic' for production. I am pleasantly suprised! i would be PROUD to drive that car.

And the next gen Prius shown above, as much as I hate everything Toyota, is a marked improvement over the current car. Lamborghini must of had some left over headlights for that design, but overall, I think it is much more attractive than the outgoing unit. And do not forget that when it comes to the Prius, people WANT it to be different looking all over. They WANT to stand out to show the world that THEY are saving the planet. That Humpback Sea Turtle look is on purpose to make it stand out on the road. And they will all be snobs on the road when driving them 45 mph on the freeway and sneering at us whizzing by as we heat the atmosphere with all things internal combustion. Please do not be this way when the Volt hits the streets. Show the Toyo boys that the Chevrolet can drive WITH traffic and not hold it up in the name of snobbery. :Toyota:

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Sorry, but I don't find cars attractive that look like the mini vacuum cleaner we used to own 15 years ago.

Styling is all a matter of opinion, but show these two pictures to anyone without telling them what they are and I bet 90% favor the Volt.

6070119.001.1M.jpg

volt-t2-1280.jpg

YES! Makes the good styling more obvious when you put it like that.

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The Volt looks fantastic from what I can see, which is a lot thanks the that video. I think it looks better than the concept. This car really will change everything.

Don't mind GXT, he is just pissing in the wind because he has to eat crow...recall back when the Volt was first reported for production that he said it would never happen.

Edited by Dodgefan
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Enough.... Enough...!

Stop all the chatter as there is only one word to describe the stying on this car.

Shocking! :)

So if they do a performance version, will it be called the Volt Super Shock? (SS) :)

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Hard to tell from the steep angle, but it looks good so far. I assume the side mirrors, roof, and lower grille/inlets will be body colored on production models, and I think I will like it better that way. It will probably come with more normal-sized wheels too.

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The Volt looks fantastic from what I can see, which is a lot thanks the that video. I think it looks better than the concept. This car really will change everything.

Don't mind GXT, he is just pissing in the wind because he has to eat crow...recall back when the Volt was first reported for production that he said it would never happen.

I may yet eat crow, but it isn't quite the time.

All I am saying is that it looks like an average and bland, small car with some ugly side mirrors attempting to over-emphasize some non-existent charging ports (hopefully that is just for transformers and will be removed from the production vehicle). Some of the adjectives being thrown around here seem silly to me. "Average" comes to mind, not "Hot" or "Fantastic". The Toyota Matrix, Honda City, Honda Fit, etc. all look as good (if not better) and they are budget cars.

2011 is a long way off for the first year of a car that looks like that... especially after over a year of GM advertising the concept.

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Hard to tell from the steep angle, but it looks good so far. I assume the side mirrors, roof, and lower grille/inlets will be body colored on production models, and I think I will like it better that way. It will probably come with more normal-sized wheels too.

I certainly hope NONE of that is the case.

The devil is in the details, especially this day in age. The details make the design IMO.

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THe Honda Fit is probably the ugliest, most disproportioned car since the aztec. Worse, actually. UGH!

Yet, the media won't give it it's due like they did the Aztek.

(You know, like how the Element was 'cool' despite being an even bigger plastic abomination than the Aztek)

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THe Honda Fit is probably the ugliest, most disproportioned car since the aztec. Worse, actually. UGH!

Actually I like the Fit quite a bit. But I hate, hate, hate the Yaris and the Versa with an ungodly passion.

Chris

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assuming they can build more than a few and sell them at a price that does something.

i love it tho, awesome looking car. a little chunky, but it makes the prius look like crap.

GM is on a roll....CTS-V, Sky, Solstice, Astra, Aura, Malibu, Enclave, Outlook, The GMT 900's, The Cruze, HHR, et al...LOTS of great product here and in the pipeline. :wub:

Things haven't really been this good from GM since the early 1970's, IMHO. :AH-HA_wink:

Chris

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Looking nice, not entirely dull either. Does look a little chunky, the side profile shot reminds me of an Avenger, and the side mirrors are hopefully only for the movie.

For this car to be successful, it not only has to look good & function well, it has to be priced affordably and uphold excellent reliability. Remember what happened when Iacocca rushed the Pinto into production...

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THe Honda Fit is probably the ugliest, most disproportioned car since the aztec. Worse, actually. UGH!

Let's not get off topic here, but the Fit is an excellent looking vehicle for its class. If you can't get past the stubby hood or how far the windshield protrudes forward, then that is ok. It is odd styling to a lot of people, but in this class it is by far the best looking overall. I told myself I would never "downgrade" back to a Honda, but I am honestly considering the Fit. The idea of mid-30 MPG in the city and the large interior room is very tempting.

I certainly hope NONE of that is the case.

The devil is in the details, especially this day in age. The details make the design IMO.

The details are very important, and the Volt needs very good details. I don't like the silver parts though, I think they should be body colored. That doesn't mean that they shouldn't be well styled.

I have a feeling they will be body colored on the production model anyway, and it will look good. The wheels will be a very important part of making the vehicle look more substantial than other hybrids. I doubt it will come with those giant 19-20inch rims seen in the photo, but as long as it has some solid looking 17 inch rims, it will do good.

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I for one LIKE the silver accents. I'm limited on monochromatic paint schemes. If everything was one color it'll blend all in and look bland. I remember when the monochromatic paint scheme was an option for the '93 Camaro when it came out. Red mirrors and roof.... wow did that not look right! The black roof and mirrors looked a whole lot better.

I do agree about the wheels though... they make or break a vehicle.

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Watered down?

No, I don't think so.

I would call this car actualized.

actualized = watered down... especially when you have been running commercials for a year(?) now and Lutz has been "leaking" such gems as:

“He (Lutz) noted that the exterior design is 90% complete but that the final product will likely have a more subdued or less aggressive front-end”

http://gm-volt.com/2007/07/04/bob-lutz-interview-on-design/

90% finalized and the only change worth mentioning is a less aggressive front-end? What is a person to think?

There will be huge enthusiasm for the Volt among buyers that represent the future of the car business, and that is how GM has a shot to right the ship. It will have to be followed by other hits of the same caliber of course, but right now it is a huge leap in the right direction.

Make no mistake, the Volt changes everything.

So GM's plan is to get people excited about a Volt concept years in advance of release and then only deliver 250,000 by 2015 (GM's numbers, not mine), almost a decade after they aired the first TV spots, and charge $40,000 or more for an "actualized" version of what was promised? While Honda/Toyota etc. will offer perhaps 1,000,000 affordably priced (20,000 or less) hybrids/year? And in the meantime GM has trouble selling even 1,000 hybrids/Q (http://wot.motortrend.com/6239143/green/gm-hybrid-sales-starting-off-slow/index.html).

Building up demand for a product that you can't deliver and thereby encourage people to buy your competitor's products seems like a bad business strategy to me. But then I don't have the track record of Wagoner.

I don't think this "changes everything". It looks like management incompetence as usual to me.

Edited by GXT
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Looks like a decent $20k compact. I don't see it having many takers at $40k.

It's the same deal with the Prius, though. I can't understand how people could fork over 30K Canadian for something that makes the Corolla look plush.

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Drive a Prius, then a Corolla, and you'll see there is no comparison. The Prius isn't a penalty box, and if definitely worth what Toyota is asking. The Volt would probably be the same way if it were priced alongside the Prius, maybe a bit more because of the technology factor, but pricing the Volt well above max sticker for the Prius and Camry isn't the best idea. Hell, $40,000 almost buys an RX hybrid.

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The Volt will be the only mass produced car that can do what it does when it hits the market - the tech eclipses that of the Prius. That fact alone will have early adopters spending what they have to in order to get one. Then add in the very,very likely tax incentives to help defray the cost, and GM will sell every one it can build.

And that's another thing, E-flex is set for huge expansion in production worldwide so initial numbers are just that: initial.

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Let's not get off topic here, but the Fit is an excellent looking vehicle for its class. If you can't get past the stubby hood or how far the windshield protrudes forward, then that is ok. It is odd styling to a lot of people, but in this class it is by far the best looking overall. I told myself I would never "downgrade" back to a Honda, but I am honestly considering the Fit. The idea of mid-30 MPG in the city and the large interior room is very tempting.

The driving dynamics make the car, it is a VERY good driving vehicle.

MUCH better than the crappy driving Yaris and Versa.

Chris

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The original US-market Fit was Dolly Partonized with oversized bumpers to meet US regulations. I'd agree that it spoilt the looks. That's what you get for making a last-minute adaptation because you are caught of-guard by Chevy selling boat-loads of Aveos. Incredibly, like the Yaris, the new model is still several inches longer than the JDM/Euro version. The Koreans can do it without plastic surgery, so what's up with Toyota and Honda?

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The original US-market Fit was Dolly Partonized with oversized bumpers to meet US regulations. I'd agree that it spoilt the looks. That's what you get for making a last-minute adaptation because you are caught of-guard by Chevy selling boat-loads of Aveos. Incredibly, like the Yaris, the new model is still several inches longer than the JDM/Euro version. The Koreans can do it without plastic surgery, so what's up with Toyota and Honda?

I am fairly sure the Fit being "Americanized" and released here had nothing to do with how well the Aveo was selling. The model had been on sale since 2001 in the rest of the world, and the US barely got any inventory to sell when it finally did get sold here. And as far as the '09 Fit goes, its release date was moved forward by over a month in response to selling out of '08 Fits.

After seeing the USDM and JDM Fits, I like the slightly longer bumper of the USDM model better. The difference is slight though, but the JDM model looks slightly stubbier.

I feel like a thread hijacker, sorry.

:hijacked:

But since Edmonds compared the Fit to the Prius recently, I suppose in some crazy round-about way it's slightly on topic. :breakdance:

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The Volt will be the only mass produced car that can do what it does when it hits the market - the tech eclipses that of the Prius. That fact alone will have early adopters spending what they have to in order to get one. Then add in the very,very likely tax incentives to help defray the cost, and GM will sell every one it can build.

And that's another thing, E-flex is set for huge expansion in production worldwide so initial numbers are just that: initial.

There are already plug-in Priuses on the road using the Hymotion pack. Google has 4 of their own that they've been driving for about a year now:

http://www.google.org/recharge/index.html

The hymotion pack is apparently $9,995 including installation. It is 5KWh and uses A123 cells (one of the two companies in the running for the Volt). So either Toyota could make a 5KWh pack for a fraction of that price or GM's 16KWh pack is going to keep the volt price well north of $40,000.

Either way, it shows that the Prius can already do pretty much what the Volt hopes to do in 2011ish. And because of the limitations of the Volt's design GM needs a lot more battery than the Prius and therefore Toyota should be able to do it for much less money.

The only real questions are whether it makes sense to do it, whether Toyota wants to do it and whether they have the capacity to create the batteries to do it. Regarding that capacity, I don't think it is clear that either company is ahead of the other.

The only meaningful advantage the Volt could claim (even in this era where GM gets to make up all the other specs at will) was the aggressive styling. And that apparently is gone.

The fact is (even according to GM) that you just won't be able to get a Volt. And compared to a $40,000 volt that you can't get a $20,000 Prius or an 18,000 Honda GSH looks pretty darn good.

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There are already plug-in Priuses on the road using the Hymotion pack. Google has 4 of their own that they've been driving for about a year now:

http://www.google.org/recharge/index.html

The hymotion pack is apparently $9,995 including installation. It is 5KWh and uses A123 cells (one of the two companies in the running for the Volt). So either Toyota could make a 5KWh pack for a fraction of that price or GM's 16KWh pack is going to keep the volt price well north of $40,000.

Either way, it shows that the Prius can already do pretty much what the Volt hopes to do in 2011ish. And because of the limitations of the Volt's design GM needs a lot more battery than the Prius and therefore Toyota should be able to do it for much less money.

The only real questions are whether it makes sense to do it, whether Toyota wants to do it and whether they have the capacity to create the batteries to do it. Regarding that capacity, I don't think it is clear that either company is ahead of the other.

The only meaningful advantage the Volt could claim (even in this era where GM gets to make up all the other specs at will) was the aggressive styling. And that apparently is gone.

The fact is (even according to GM) that you just won't be able to get a Volt. And compared to a $40,000 volt that you can't get a $20,000 Prius or an 18,000 Honda GSH looks pretty darn good.

Good argument regarding the economics of comparing a 5KWH not OEM system to that of the Volt but you have some major flaws.

#1 the economy of scales. You will have someone who has been selling 10-20 cars a month even give the most benefit of doubt to 100 cars a month compared to someone who will produce at least 1,000 cars a months initially (Assuming 10,000 units in first year of production run). Don't you think that one order of magnitude of production will produce at least 50% reduction in cost?

#2. Those $9,000 involves three costs. One - battery suppliers own profit markup, two - the aftermarket suppliers own markup for "purchasing" the batteries plus costs for retrofitting. If you have mass production (point #1) you will be better able to control the price of the supplier, reduce the overhead price for selling it to the consumer and there will be no retrofitting cost.

#3. At this point the aftermarket supplier has non existent competition. Tell me the numbers when the Volt or even plugin Prius starts making those vehicles as OEM.

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Exactly. You can't say "oh well Toyota MIGHT, again MIGHT be able to use the aftermarket system" because then Toyota would have to be handing money over to that company to use it. We all know Toyota want's to have it been there own even if they didn't make it. Not to mention warranty claims and the fact the GM is STILL the only car company right now with a SOLID layout for a plug in. I ask you, where's the others plug in's @? I don't see any being tested on the roads....

Edited by deftonesfan867
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whoever packaged hiperf hybrid in an attractive package will be the new paradigm. this car might do it. toyota doesn't have the ability to make a stylish vehicle. they won't be the ones to do it. honda has some serious mental masturbation issues in their styling department lately too.

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It's a nice looking car. Very modern, very proportionally "right". Sleek roof line, short hood, high deck. Just as unique but far better looking than the Camaro or the Cruze. I like it!

Hybrid or not, Chevys should look like that.

Maybe they should have a high performance version of it... say a two 120kW (240kW; 321hp total) Permanent Magnet motors driving the wheels. Forget the plug-in part and just have a low capacity, high current Li-Ion battery to cope with short acceleration bursts. Power can come from a 60~70kW gas turbine generator the size of a small waste paper basket. Again, performance, light weight and high power density is the goal here not ultimate fuel economy. It'll be RWD, it'll have the equivalent of active differentials with its ability to meter torque to the left and right rear wheels at will, it'll be light given the extremely small gas turbine generator plant.

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I am typically a Volt buyer but could be swayed to buy one if they look this good and they are priced right. Still prefer a nice G8 or Camaro tho.

You just said you're a "typical" Volt buyer. Then you said you prefer a nice G8 or Camaro.

Dude...you're not a typical Volt buyer at all!

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You just said you're a "typical" Volt buyer. Then you said you prefer a nice G8 or Camaro.

Dude...you're not a typical Volt buyer at all!

Yes, a 'typical' Volt buyer would never consider anything with a V8 or remotely fun..they want green, practical, generic. The Volt has to go after the Prius intenders...

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I hope you're not being sarcastic because you hit the nail right on the head.

Nope...dead serious. It's a demographic that is new to GM...they have to tap that market for this car to be successful.

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Good argument regarding the economics of comparing a 5KWH not OEM system to that of the Volt but you have some major flaws.

#1 the economy of scales. You will have someone who has been selling 10-20 cars a month even give the most benefit of doubt to 100 cars a month compared to someone who will produce at least 1,000 cars a months initially (Assuming 10,000 units in first year of production run). Don't you think that one order of magnitude of production will produce at least 50% reduction in cost?

#2. Those $9,000 involves three costs. One - battery suppliers own profit markup, two - the aftermarket suppliers own markup for "purchasing" the batteries plus costs for retrofitting. If you have mass production (point #1) you will be better able to control the price of the supplier, reduce the overhead price for selling it to the consumer and there will be no retrofitting cost.

#3. At this point the aftermarket supplier has non existent competition. Tell me the numbers when the Volt or even plugin Prius starts making those vehicles as OEM.

I would appreciate if you would read my post more closely before you accuse me of having "major flaws".

I wrote: "The hymotion pack is apparently $9,995 including installation. It is 5KWh and uses A123 cells (one of the two companies in the running for the Volt). So either Toyota could make a 5KWh pack for a fraction of that price or GM's 16KWh pack is going to keep the volt price well north of $40,000.

I didn't state which I believed to be the case, so I don't know you can say that I had "major flaws". Since you asked so nicely, I do think you are right. But my point was that either way Toyota has GM beat in cost effectiveness due to the limitations in the Volt design.

If you don't believe me, ask GM themselves. How long did they argue against hybrids because of the battery cost? Now what do they do? Design a car that has a battery 7 to 8 times larger but only with 4 times the usable power. And then they slapped an engine on it to negate major cost/weight benefit that their series design had.

Edited by GXT
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Exactly. You can't say "oh well Toyota MIGHT, again MIGHT be able to use the aftermarket system" because then Toyota would have to be handing money over to that company to use it. We all know Toyota want's to have it been there own even if they didn't make it. Not to mention warranty claims and the fact the GM is STILL the only car company right now with a SOLID layout for a plug in. I ask you, where's the others plug in's @? I don't see any being tested on the roads....

How hard did you look? Apparently Toyota has had them on the road since 2007:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19952006/

I'm not saying Toyota MIGHT be able to use the aftermarket system. I'm saying that if someone can make an aftermarket system to do it then how hard would it be for Toyota to do it?

Edited by GXT
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